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Behavioural activation therapy for depression in adults

UPHOFF E., et al
2020

This systematic review sought to find out how well behavioural activation therapy works for depression in adults. Behavioural activation is a type of psychological therapy that encourages a person to develop or get back into activities which are meaningful to them. The therapy involves scheduling activities and monitoring behaviours and looking at specific situations where changing these behaviours and activities may be helpful. The review looked at 53 randomised controlled studies involving 5495 participants and conducted in 14 countries. The review found that behavioural activation may treat depression better than receiving usual care. It is unclear whether it works better than medication or being on a waiting list, and there was no evidence for this outcome comparing behavioural activation to no treatment or placebo treatment. There was no differences between behavioural activation and CBT in treating depression. Although there was not enough evidence to compare behavioural activation reliably with other psychotherapies, it may work better than humanistic therapy, and no differences were found between behavioural activation and third‐wave CBT or psychodynamic therapy. No evidence was available comparing behavioural activation to integrative therapies. This systematic review suggests that behavioural activation may be more effective than humanistic therapy, medication, and treatment as usual, and that it may be no less effective than CBT, psychodynamic therapy, or being placed on a waiting list. However, confidence in these findings is limited due to concerns about the certainty of the evidence.

Video calls for reducing social isolation and loneliness in older people: a rapid review (Review)

NOONE Chris, et al
2020

A rapid review to assess the effectiveness of video calls for reducing social isolation and loneliness in older adults. The review also sought to address the effectiveness of video calls on reducing symptoms of depression and improving quality of life. Selection criteria: Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi‐RCTs (including cluster designs) were eligible for inclusion. Main results: Three cluster quasi-randomised trials, which together included 201 participants were included in this review. The included studies compared video call interventions to usual care in nursing homes. None of these studies were conducted during the COVID-19 pandemic. Each study measured loneliness using the UCLA Loneliness Scale. The evidence was very uncertain and suggests that video calls may result in little to no difference in scores on the Geriatric Depression Scale compared to usual care at three months' follow-up. Conclusion: Based on this review there is currently very uncertain evidence on the effectiveness of video call interventions to reduce loneliness in older adults. The review did not include any studies that reported evidence of the effectiveness of video call interventions to address social isolation in older adults. The evidence regarding the effectiveness of video calls for outcomes of symptoms of depression was very uncertain. Future research in this area needs to use more rigorous methods and more diverse and representative participants.

Results 1 - 2 of 2

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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