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All research records related prevention examples and research

Results 1 - 10 of 321

Home from hospital: how housing services are relieving pressures on the NHS

COPEMAN Ian, EDWARDS Margaret, PORTEUS Jeremy, HOUSING LEARNING AND IMPROVEMENT NETWORK
2017

This report shows how housing services are helping to relieve pressure on the NHS by reducing delays in discharging people from hospital and preventing unnecessary hospital admissions. It features 12 case studies to show the positive impact these services have on people’s lives and the cost benefit to the NHS. The case studies highlight services that will benefit people most at risk of delayed discharge, such as older people, people with mental health problems and people experiencing homelessness. The case stuides also demonstrate a diversity of housing and health services including: ‘step down’ bed services for people coming out of hospital who cannot return to their own home immediately; hospital discharge support and housing adaptation services to enable timely and appropriate transfers out of hospital and back to patients’ existing homes; providing a new home for people whose existing home or lack of housing mean that they have nowhere suitable to be discharged to; and Home from Hospital services to keeping people well at home who would otherwise be at risk of being admitted or readmitted to hospital. The report also considers the impact and additional savings that could be made by housing providers if this work were to be scaled up.

Housing our ageing population: learning from councils meeting the housing needs of ageing population

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2017

The suitability of the housing stock is of critical importance to the health of individuals and also impacts on public spending, particularly social care and the NHS. This report sets out what is required to meet the housing needs and aspirations of an ageing population, outlines the current policy context and presents detailed case studies of good practice to show how councils are innovating to support older people to live in their homes for longer and promote positive ageing. They include examples of integrated approaches to health, housing and care to support older people at home; care and repair schemes to provide support for older people in mainstream housing, long term housing planning; and developing appropriate new housing for older people. The case studies are from Birmingham City Council, Central Bedfordshire Council, Essex County Council, Mansfield District Council, Newcastle City Council, North Somerset, Bristol, Bath and North-East Somerset Councils, and Worcestershire County Council. The report highlights key lessons from the case studies: having a clear vision, promoting awareness and changing attitudes; housing planning, which meets local need and involves older people; delivering and enabling new housing for older people across the public and private sector; developing integrated approaches to housing, health and care; and sustaining older people in mainstream housing. It also outlines recommendations for Government, policy makers, councils, and providers.

Asset-based commissioning: better outcomes, better value

FIELD Richard, MILLER Clive
2017

This publication provides an overview of asset-based practice and looks at the development of asset-aware and asset-based commissioning. It makes the case for adopting asset-based commissioning to improve outcomes for individuals and the community and outlines the implications for stakeholders, systems, behaviours and relationships of making this change. Asset-based commissioning is an approach which enables people and communities to become equal co-commissioners and co-producers and make the best use of all assets. The publication includes many examples of past and current innovations and looks at how they could be further developed and implemented at scale to achieve improved, economic, environmental and social outcomes. Key sections: look at the development of asset-based practice, its key principles and the role played by user-led organisations, personalisation, co-production and self-help ; examine how commissioning has evolved over the last three decades and how the current model is moving towards asset-based commissioning; and describe the paradigm shift involved in moving from conventional to asset-based commissioning and synthesises a wide range of asset-based commissioning practices into a unified model. The final section provides a guide to where and how to get started in developing asset-based commissioning and explores how to do this at scale.

Making sense of social prescribing

POLLEY Marie, et al
2017

This guide provides an overview of the key aspects of social prescribing. Commissioned by NHS England, the guide has been co-produced by people with practical experience of designing, commissioning and delivering social prescribing schemes. Sections of the guide cover: the definition and key components of social prescribing, the reasons for developing social prescribing schemes; examples of different models; what makes a good link worker; what makes a good referral; governance and risk management; and evaluating schemes. The guide also includes links to additional resources.

Older people receiving family-based support in the community: a survey of quality of life among users of 'Shared Lives' in England

CALLAGHAN Lisa, BROOKES Nadia, PALMER Sinead
2017

Shared Lives (adult placement) is a model of community-based support where an adult who needs support and/or accommodation moves into or regularly visits the home of an approved Shared Lives carer, after they have been matched for compatibility. It is an established but small service which has been used mainly by people with learning disabilities but which has the potential to offer an alternative to traditional services for some older people. However, there is little research on the outcomes for older users of Shared Lives. This paper presents findings from a survey of 150 older people using Shared Lives support across 10 Shared Lives schemes in England, which took place between June 2013 and January 2014. The aim was to identify outcomes for older users of Shared Lives and compare these to outcomes for older users of other social care services. In the absence of an ideal study design involving randomised allocation, statistical matching was used to generate a comparison group from the Adult Social Care Survey from 2011/12, with 121 cases matched to 121 Shared Lives cases. The main outcome measures were Social Care-Related Quality of Life (measured by the ASCOT) and overall quality of life. Findings indicated that Shared Lives can deliver good outcomes for older people, particularly for overall quality of life. In comparison to the matched group of older people using other forms of support, there was some evidence that Shared Lives may deliver better outcomes in some aspects of quality of life. Limitations to the research mean, however, that more work is needed to fully understand the role Shared Lives could play in supporting older people.

The Lightbulb project: switched on to integration in Leicestershire

MORAN Alison
2017

A case study of the Lightbulb project, which brings together County and District Councils and other partners in Leicestershire to help people stay in their homes for as long as possible. The approach includes GPs and other health and care professionals and relies on early at home assessment process at key points of entry. This is delivered through a ‘hub and spoke’ model with an integrated Locality Lightbulb Team in each District Council area and covers: minor adaptations and equipment; DFGs; wider housing support needs (warmth, energy, home security); housing related health and wellbeing (AT, falls prevention); planning for the future (housing options); and housing related advice, information, and signposting. The Lightbulb service also includes a cost effective specialist Hospital Housing Enabler Team based in acute and mental health hospital settings across Leicestershire. The team work directly with patients and hospital staff to identify and resolve housing issues that are a potential barrier to hospital discharge and also provide low level support to assist with the move home from hospital to help prevent readmissions.

Building bridges: bringing councils, communities and independent funders into dialogue

GILBERT Abigail
2017

This report highlights the need for collaboration between local organisations and local government in order to secure the wellbeing of communities at a time of increasing pressure facing local government budgets and increasing demand for services. The report found that councils need to work more closely with other funders of civil society, and communities, to enable change. It shows that effective collaboration between independent funders and local government can result in more intelligent, inclusive commissioning, more innovation at scale, better distribution and use of assets within localities, and more participation and engagement with communities. It also identifies potential barriers to collaboration, which include: a lack of a shared sense of purpose; a lack of consensus on what effective prevention looks like; and both councils and funders wanting to maintain their independence and reputation. The report makes a number of recommendations to improve collaboration. These include: for local authorities to have a senior officer responsible for developing funding; for elected members to building bridges between the council and independent funders; and for independent funders, such as charitable trusts, to work collaboratively with councils in order to define what ‘good’ service delivery looks like. Although the evidence for this report is focused on London, many of the findings and messages will be relevant to a wider audience.

The place of kindness: combating loneliness and building stronger communities

FERGUSON Zoe
2017

Reports on the second stage of a project to explore what can encourage kinder communities at a time when isolation and loneliness are recognised as major challenges. The project was carried out by the Carnegie UK Trust with the support of Joseph Rowntree Foundation, It worked with seven organisations in Scotland over a period of nine months, exploring the importance of places and opportunities to connect, and the intrinsic values that underpin interactions and relationships. This report identifies examples which show how kindness and everyday relationships can affect change and support the wellbeing of individuals and communities. It also identifies key factors that get in the way of encouraging kindness both in individuals and organisations. These include real and imagined rules relating to risk; funders and policy makers valuing the formal and organisational over the informal and individual; and modern definitions of professionalism and good leadership obscuring every day and intuitive human interactions. Examples of the work carried out by the seven organisations are included in the appendices.

Person-centred approaches: empowering people to live their lives and communities to enable to upgrade in prevention, wellbeing, health, care and support

SKILLS FOR HEALTH, SKILLS FOR CARE
2017

This education and training framework, commissioned by Health Education England, sets out core skills to support health and social care workforce to deliver person-centred approaches. It will help to staff communicate meaningfully, ensure they tailor the care and advice they give to suit peoples’ needs. It is applicable across services, sectors and across different types of organisations. The framework begins by describing the values, communication and relationship building skills that everyone delivering services should have to ensure consistent person-centred approaches. It arranges these into three ‘steps’: conversations to engage with people; conversations to enable and support people; and conversations with people to collaboratively manage highest complexity and significant risk. Within each step, the framework outlines behaviours which aim to illustrate what people and their carers would see in practice; learning outcomes; and short practice examples. Where appropriate, the framework encourages shared decision making and ensuring that all information is personalised, accessible and useful. The framework includes tips for delivering training and enablers for embedding a person-centred approach in organisations. The framework has been developed with the participation of health and social care experts and people who are experts by experience.

Flipping the narrative: essays on transformation from the sector's boldest voices

NEW PHILANTHROPY CAPITAL
2017

A compilation of 16 essays from innovative leaders in the charitable sector on how they are thinking about, and putting into action, new ways of achieving social change for the causes and beneficiaries their organisations. It includes contributions from leaders in national charities and smaller innovative organisations based in communities. The essays cover four key themes: strategy and governance – how organisational and governance change can support charities to deliver greater impact; the sector’s relationship with the public – the importance of trust and how charities can develop trust with the public; the sector’s relationship with the state –how to reframe interactions with the state and methods for forming more productive relationships, building on the strengths of the voluntary sector and their ability to understand the challenges of those accessing public services; and new networks and resources – building collaborations with new partners from different sectors and maximising the potential of new resources, such as digital technology and the voices and strengths of the communities they exist to serve.

Results 1 - 10 of 321

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