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All research records related prevention examples and research

Results 101 - 110 of 328

Living well in old age: the value of UK housing interventions in supporting mental health and wellbeing in later life

FENDT-NEWLIN Meredith, et al
2016

Reports on an evidence review to explore the role of UK housing interventions in supporting the mental health and wellbeing of older people and their ability to live well at home. The review was commissioned by HACT and carried out by the Social Care Workforce Research Unit at King’s College London. Part one of the report looks at what is known about UK housing interventions that aim to promote mental health and wellbeing among older people. It provides a description of the evidence and the implications for practice and commissioning under the following themes: Identification, diagnosis and management of symptoms; Environments; and Reducing social isolation and loneliness. Part two explores questions around integration and how health, housing and social care agencies are working together to support older people’s mental wellbeing. It identifies some of the barriers to effective collaboration and looks at how these might be overcome. Three key messages emerged from the review of the evidence: the need for people working in service planning and commissioning to include housing needs in the integration debate; the importance of relationships between managers and practitioners from different sectors at a local level; and the need to take a UK perspective in order to share innovation in social housing happening in different parts of the country.

New care models and prevention: an integral partnership

NHS CONFEDERATION, et al
2016

This publication looks at what new care models are doing on prevention and what the emerging practice looks like. Key to the realisation of the Forward View vision and principles has been the development of ‘new care models’ which have prevention and public health at their heart, and are forging ahead. The new models include: integrated primary and acute care systems (PACS), multispecialty community providers (MCPs), enhanced health in care homes, urgent and emergency care, and acute care collaborations. Through a rigorous process, involving workshops and the engagement of key partners and patient representative groups, 50 new care model ‘vanguards’ were selected, taking the lead on the development and implementation of new care models. This publication looks at how five of the vanguards are addressing prevention. These are: All Together Better Sunderland (MCP); West Wakefield Health and Wellbeing (MCP); Sutton Homes of Care (enhanced health in care homes); Connecting Care – Wakefield District (enhanced health in care homes); and Solihull Together for Better Lives (urgent and emergency care). The case studies all show the importance of having as full an understanding as possible of the needs of the local population, including in some cases through risk stratification. Working across organisational and professional boundaries, and getting staff on board, involved and equipped to deliver care in new ways has also proven to be essential. Equally important is tapping into and getting the most out of the experience and skills of carers, volunteers and third sector organisations, and empowering people to ‘self-care’. At the same time, initiatives such as social prescribing have the potential to greatly improve people’s wellbeing. These case studies highlight the need to look beyond the boundaries of health and social care services to the way people actually live their lives, and tailor the support accordingly

Prevention in action: the extent to which English local authorities and health and wellbeing boards recognise and prioritise prevention, as defined within the Care Act (2014)

FIELD Olivia, CARTER Chloe
2016

Explores the extent to which local authorities and health and wellbeing boards across England recognise and prioritise the Care Act’s understanding of prevention. The study reviewed joint health and wellbeing strategies for the third year in a row, and made a Freedom of Information (FOI) request of all English local authorities to examine whether, and in which context, prevention was mentioned in the HWBs relevant documentation and how local authorities were implementing Section 2 of the Care Act. The Freedom of Information (FOI) responses indicate that local authorities are engaging with the Care Act’s triple definition of prevention, but this terminology has yet to be embraced by health and wellbeing boards. Both the FOI responses and joint health and wellbeing strategy review indicate that prevention is a key consideration in local decision making, including commissioning. However, while the review of joint health and wellbeing strategies indicates an improved understanding of prevention, tertiary types of prevention are still not being emphasised as much as primary and secondary prevention. In some cases, they are forgotten altogether. Many health and wellbeing boards are yet to place importance on preventative measures that could stop the deterioration or reoccurrence of a health or social care-related crisis by providing lower-level support. FOI responses and joint health and wellbeing strategies also emphasise the practical difficulties of shifting resources away from crisis intervention to prevention, especially in the current economic climate.

Joint review of partnerships and investment in voluntary, community and social enterprise organisations in the health and care sector

GREAT BRITAIN. Department of Health, PUBLIC HEALTH ENGLAND, NHS ENGLAND
2016

This joint review sets out the role of the voluntary, community and social enterprise (VCSE) sector in improving health, wellbeing and care outcomes and identifies how the sector can best address potential challenges and maximise opportunities. The report places wellbeing at the centre of health and care services, and making VCSE organisations an integral part of a collaborative system. It makes 28 recommendations for government, health and care system partners, funders, regulatory bodies and the VCSE sector. Chapters: explore the contribution that VCSE organisations can play in reducing the human and financial costs associated with health inequalities, often through peer- and community-led activity; the benefits of partnership working and collaboration between commissioners, VCSE organisations and individuals; the importance of evidence and impact assessment, and how both can be used more effectively in health and care services; and the importance of commissioning practice, identifying a number of key principles that should underpin the funding relationship between public sector bodies and the VCSE sector. Each chapter looks at what is needed to achieve success and includes short case studies. The final chapters discuss the role of VCSE infrastructure bodies and set out the value of the Voluntary Sector Improvement Programme and recommendations for its future focus. Recommendations include the need for health and care services to be co-produced, focussed on wellbeing and valuing individuals' and communities' capacities and for social value to become a fundamental part of health and care commissioning and service provision.

Just what the doctor ordered: social prescribing - a guide for local authorities

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2016

Social prescribing, sometimes called community referrals, is a way of enabling primary care services to refer patients with social, emotional or practical needs to a range of local community services and activities to improve their health and wellbeing. This publication highlights the role of local authorities in facilitating social prescribing and provides nine short case studies to show how councils are working across England.

Community engagement: improving health and wellbeing and reducing health inequalities (NG44)

NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR HEALTH AND CARE EXCELLENCE
2016

This practice guideline covers approaches to involving local communities as a way of promoting health and wellbeing and reducing health inequalities. Recommendations cover: developing collaboration and partnership approaches encourage alliances between community members and statutory, community and voluntary organisations to meet local needs and priorities; involving people in peer and lay roles to represent local needs and priorities; local approaches to making community engagement an integral part of health and wellbeing initiatives; and making it as easy as possible for people to get involved. The guideline also makes recommendations for future research which include research on effectiveness and cost effectiveness; frameworks to evaluate the impact of community engagement; aspects of collaborations and partnerships that lead to improved health and wellbeing; and the effectiveness of social media for improving health and wellbeing. The guideline updates and replaces NICE guideline PH9 (published February 2008).

What role can local and national supportive services play in supporting independent and healthy living in individuals 65 and over?

WINDLE Karen
2015

This report explores the evidence base around effective and cost-effective preventative services and the role that they can play in supporting older people’s independence, health and wellbeing. It looks at the available evidence to support the benefits of preventative services in mitigating social inclusion and loneliness and improving physical health. It also highlights evidence on the effectiveness of information, advice and signposting in helping people access preventative services and the benefits of providing practical interventions such as minor housing repairs. It considers a wide range of primary and secondary preventative services, including: health screening, vaccinations, day services, reablement, and care coordination and management. It then outlines two teritary prevention services which aim to prevent imminent admission to acute health settings. These are community based rapid response services and ambulatory emergency care units, which operation within the secondary care environment. The report then highlights gaps in the evidence base and and looks at what is needed to develop preventative services to achieve health and independent ageing by 2013. It looks at the changes needed in service funding and commissioning, the balance between individual responsibility and organisational support, and how preventative services should be implemented.

Lack of communication between children's and adults' social care: practice issues from Serious Case Reviews

NATIONAL SOCIETY FOR THE PREVENTION OF CRUELTY TO CHILDREN, SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
2016

Briefing paper which looks at lack of communication and information sharing between children's and adult's social care in child protection services. It is one of a series 14 briefings looking at difficult issues in inter-professional communication and decision-making identified from 38 Serious Case Reviews, with added information gathered from three multi-agency ‘summits’. Drawing on the analysis of serious care review reports, the briefing highlights the reasons why there can be a lack of communication between adult's social care and children's social care, which include: a lack of understanding of each others roles and of how to work together in order to attain a whole-family assessment. It also provides solutions suggested by summit participants and contains a set of self-assessment questions to support managers and practitioners to tackle similar issues in their own local area.

The force begins to awaken: a third review of the state of health and wellbeing boards

SHARED INTELLIGENCE
2016

An evaluation of the current position of health and wellbeing boards (HWBs), which seeks to identify features and factors that influence whether or not a board makes significant progress. The report draws on information from interviews with 23 local and national stakeholders involved with HWBs; a workshop with people doing bespoke work with boards on behalf of the Local Government Association; observation of and a focus group discussion at a HWB leadership essentials course; and a review of eight health and wellbeing peer challenges. The report identifies a number of factors which have a significant influence on the effectiveness of a HWB. Factors identified are: committed leadership; a history of collaboration between health and social care; clarity of purpose; a geography that works; the response to austerity; a focus on place; a director of public health who understands the role of HWB; high quality day-to-day support; changes in board membership and leadership; and good basic housekeeping to enable effective leadership. The final section of the report summarises key actions and areas to address if boards are to be more effective. The report concludes that a small but significant number of health and wellbeing boards (HWBs) are now beginning to play a genuine leadership role across the local health and care system. It finds that boards are considerably more effective than they were a year ago and a number of other boards are on the cusp of making that shift. Most boards are doing useful work, but their potential remains unfulfilled.

The state of Shared Lives in England: report 2016

SHARED LIVES PLUS
2016

This report draws on a survey of Shared Lives Plus members across the country to provide an analysis of services across England, covering the period 2014/15. The report includes figures on numbers of people using Shared Lives services, the number of carers, staff turnover and motivation, types of arrangement (live in, short breaks and day support) and numbers of users by region. The results show that the number of people using Shared Lives support is continuing to rise. In 2014/15 11,570 people were getting help from Shared Lives compared to 10,440 in 2013/14. People with learning disabilities remain the primary users of Shared Lives support, accounting for 76% of all users. The next largest group getting help via Shared Lives were people with mental health problems who made up 7% of users. The survey also reports a rise in both the number of older people and people with dementia using Shared Lives. There has also been an increase of over 50% in use of Shared Lives as day support. Projected cost savings are provided to show the total savings that could be made if Shared Lives reached its full potential. Short case studies are also included to illustrate the benefits of Shared Lives schemes.

Results 101 - 110 of 328

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