#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#

Find prevention records by subject or service provider/commissioner name

  • Key to icons

    • Journal Prevention service example
    • Book Book
    • Digital media Digital media
    • Journal Journal article
    • Free resource Free resource

All research records related prevention examples and research

Results 141 - 150 of 328

Resilience in practice

WALKER Andrew
2015

This paper looks at what resilience means for local authorities and offers guidance for councils in their thinking about the subject. Resilience in this context is defined as the capacity of local areas to respond to immediate crises, to build their resources and adapt to changing circumstances in the future. The paper is based on an in-depth workshop with participants from local government across England, interviews with council officers with responsibility for resilience issues, and case studies that demonstrate some of the innovative approaches that could be taken to enable resilience. The paper begins by summarising existing understandings and definitions of resilience; discusses the issues and concerns that local authorities have with resilience; then looks at some of the ways they are seeking to develop it in their areas. Case examples include a project to develop community resilience in Hounslow and Family Group Conference programme in Camden which contributes to family resilience. The second section outlines a definition and typology of resilience and then applies the typology to the example of climate change. It then proposes a checklist that authorities could follow when developing resilience strategies and interventions. The paper stresses the importance of local authorities working with communities and individuals in partnership to make places more resilient, helping communities use their assets effectively and bringing about holistic change in the way communities function.

The district council contribution to public health: a time of challenge and opportunity

BUCK David, DUNN Phoebe
2015

A contribution to the understanding, assessment and development of the role of district councils in improving the health of their citizens and communities. The report sets out what determines health, why district councils have an important role to play in shaping it, and the public health system and policy context in which district councils operate. It describes the key areas in which district council functions contribute to public health and provides a quick guide to the high level economics of public health for district councils. In addition, the report presents key evidence, including the impact on health, effectiveness and, where available, cost-effectiveness and return on investment, for each of the core functions of housing, green space and leisure, and environmental health services, arguing that district councils’ wider enabling role, in economic development, planning and engaging with their communities has benefits for health. A number of short case studies of innovation in service delivery in relation to health and wellbeing are also included. In the final section the report outlines a set of high-level recommendations for district councils and other stakeholders to ensure that they take advantage of the opportunities on offer.

Growing healthy communities: the Health and Wellbeing Index

GRANT THORNTON UK LLP
2015

This report highlights the extent to which economic, social and environmental determinants translate to good or bad health outcomes in their broadest sense. It also shows the scale and nature of inequality across the country and reiterates the need for a local, place-based approach to tackling health outcomes. The report is based on league tables that assess 33 key health determinants and outcomes at local authority district level. The analysis reveals that the top three determinants that most strongly correlate to health outcomes are child poverty, deprivation and unemployment. Crime ranks as only seventh strongest with childhood education, social cohesions and occupations all proven as having a bigger impact on overall health outcomes. Case studies from Barnet, Greenwich and Richmond and Kingston outline some of the lessons that can be learnt from these and where collaboration has been seen to address an area’s determinants to improve health outcomes. That nine of the ten fall within London, where the boundaries of health commissioning are coterminous with those of the local authority may imply more readily facilitated joint-working leading to improved outcomes.

Building the right support: a national plan to develop community services and close inpatient facilities for people with learning disability...including those with a mental health condition

NHS ENGLAND, LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION, ASSOCIATION OF DIRECTORS OF ADULT SOCIAL SERVICES
2015

Sets out a national plan to enable people with learning disabilities who display behaviour that challenges to be supported to live more independently in their local community and reduce reliance on institutional care and long stay hospitals. The plan looks at the learning from the six 'fast track' areas; describes the new services that will be needed to better support people with learning disabilities to live in the community; and outlines how transforming care partnerships (commissioning collaborations of local authorities, CCGs and NHS England partners) in health and care will need to work together to deliver these changes. Areas discussed include: the need for appropriate local housing, such as schemes where people have their own home but ready access to on-site support staff; an expansion of the use of personal budgets, enabling people and their families to plan their own care, beyond those who already have a legal right to them; for people to have access to a local care and support navigator or key worker; and investment in advocacy and advice services run by local charities and voluntary organisations. To achieve the shift from inpatient to community-based services the plan identifies three key changes: that local councils and NHS bodies will join together to deliver better and more coordinated services; pooled budgets between the NHS and local councils to ensure the right care is provided in the right place; and adoption of a new service model.

Peer support for people with dementia resource pack: promoting peer support opportunities for people with dementia

HEALTH INNOVATION NETWORK SOUTH LONDON
2015

Bringing together examples of good practice and evidence-based guidance, the pack aims to help groups and organisations better support people with dementia in their communities. The pack was developed in partnership with leading dementia and older people charities, with contributions from Innovations in Dementia, The Alzheimer’s Society, AGE UK and Mental Health Foundation. The Health Innovation Network dementia team worked with people with dementia across south London to provide case studies and contribute to the films within the pack. The guide includes: information about what peer support is and how different types of groups can support people with dementia; why peer support can help people with dementia stay connected with their communities; guidance and resources to help people who want to run groups for or including people with dementia; and some ideas for how to tell if the group is doing well.

How do we develop a person-centred, community-centred workforce, to support people with long-term conditions?

COALITION FOR COLLABORATIVE CARE
2015

This discussion paper explores how to plan, develop and support an integrated workforce that routinely works in a person-centred, community-centred way. The paper focuses in four areas, looking at: mind-set challenges for person and community-centred care; the specific knowledge and skills that are needed; the importance of supportive working environments; and capacity, roles and workforce planning. The paper is intended to stimulate discussion. It briefly sets out some ideas on: the context and what we mean by person-centred, community-centred care; the workforce challenge; what is needed to create change at the local and national levels; and what action the C4CC partnership might take.

Quick guide: improving hospital discharge into the care sector

et al, NHS ENGLAND
2015

This quick guide provides ideas and practical tips to commissioners and providers on how to improve hospital discharge for people with care home places or packages of care at home. The guide identifies areas for improvement, setting out checklist actions for local health economies to consider and examples of practical solutions and links to resources. The areas identified are: culture of collaboration between care sector, NHS and social care; improving communication; clarity on information sharing and information governance; difficulties with achieving the ‘home before lunch’ ambition; assessments undertaken in hospital leading to ‘deconditioning’ and longer, unnecessary hospital stays; delays to discharge due to awaiting for assessment; capacity of community-based services; and patient experience and involvement.

Quick guide: technology in care homes

NHS ENGLAND, et al
2015

This quick guide highlights a number of case studies from around the country where technology is being used successfully to enhance the delivery of care to support independent living (telecare), to enhance the health and wellbeing information exchange between patients and professionals (telehealth) and to enhance the information exchange between professionals (telemedicine). It also includes information about secure email and collaboration. Drawing on the case studies, the guide sets out a series of top tips for developing and implementing successful technological initiatives.

Quick guide: better use of care at home

NHS ENGLAND, et al
2015

This quick guide provides case studies, ideas and practical tips to commissioners, health professionals and care providers on how to improve the relationships, processes and use of homecare and housing support to help people home from hospital. Care at home and housing support enables people to live independently and well in their preferred environment for longer, providing continuity and familiarity through frequent close contact. It plays an essential role in helping people return home, which should always be seen as the default option. The guide identifies common problems experienced and highlights good solutions which are already being implemented, that can be instigated quickly and effectively, focusing on three elements of a patient’s pathway: 1) planning for discharge home on arrival at hospital; 2) enabling people to go home with appropriate support; 3) and helping people to stay at home.

A shared life is a healthy life: how the Shared Lives model of care can improve health outcomes and support the NHS

SHARED LIVES PLUS
2015

Explains how Shared Lives schemes support people with health needs, making use of community based solutions which can be more cost effective than traditional institutional care. In Shared Lives, an adult (and sometimes a 16/17 year old) who needs support and/or accommodation moves in with or regularly visits an approved Shared Lives carer, after they have been matched for compatibility. Together they share family and community life. Half of the 12,000 UK citizens using Shared Lives are living with their carer as part of a supportive household; half visit their carer for day support or overnight breaks. Shared Lives is also used as a stepping stone for an individual to possibly become fully independent. The report demonstrates that this approach can provide care at lower cost; improves people’s health; reduces pressure on health services; and reduces inequalities in health service provision.

Results 141 - 150 of 328

#EXCLUDE#
Ask about support on integration, STPs and transformation
ENQUIRE
Related SCIE content
Related NICE content
Related external content
Visit Social Care Online, the UK’s largest database of information and research on all aspects of social care and social work.
SEARCH NOW
Submit prevention service example
SUBMIT
What do you think about SCIE's work?
FEEDBACK
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#