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All research records related prevention examples and research

Results 181 - 190 of 328

Joint review of investment in voluntary, community and social enterprise organisations in health and care sector

GREAT BRITAIN. Department of Health, et al
2015

This report summarises the initial findings of a review developed in co-production with the statutory and voluntary sectors, exploring how the sector could: maximise and demonstrate its impact; build sustainability and capacity; promote equality and address health inequalities. From January to March 2015 around 4,500 people and organisations were consulted, sharing their views on the current state of the statutory and VCSE sectors, the key challenges they face, including reduced funding, and the potential of the sector, particularly in relation to equality and health inequalities, prevention and resilience, and personalisation and co-production.

Ageing in the UK: trends and foresight: report 7

FLATTERS Paul, JOHNSON Tom, O'SHEA Ruairi
2015

Presents key information and data on the UK ageing population, including an analysis of current trends and the implications for the future. The report sets out the national picture, focusing on the demographic context, the state of income, pensions and retirement arrangements, and health issues. In addition, the report considers a range of aspects associated with old age, including: loneliness, dementia, older carers, volunteering, and digital inclusion. The report indicates that the population of the UK is set to increase significantly over the next decade, with much of this growth driven by an ageing population and sustained increases in the number of people over 65 years old. While the number of older people living in relative or absolute poverty has not increased since the start of the economic downturn, the minimum income standard for pensioners has risen and many of those on low incomes have trouble meeting everyday expenditure. The report suggests that higher dependency ratios will place huge demand on already strained public services, requiring greater support from the charitable sector. The impact of dementia will be a significant area of need in the future: even if incidence rates remain stable, the growth in the population of people over the age of 65 will see the number affected more than double from c.800,000 in 2012 to 2.2m in 2051. However, the report concludes that it is likely that incidence rates for dementia will increase as longevity continues to increase and diagnosis improves.

Knowledge exchange in health-care commissioning: case studies of the use of commercial, not-for-profit and public sector agencies, 2011-14

WYE Lesley, et al
2015

The aim of this study was to explore how commissioners obtained, modified and used information to inform their decisions, focusing in particular in the knowledge obtained from external organisations such as management consultancies, Public Health and commissioning support units. In eight case studies, researchers interviewed 92 external consultants and their clients, observed 25 meetings and training sessions, and analysed documents such as meeting minutes and reports. Data were analysed within each case study and then across all case studies. Commissioners used many types of information from multiple sources to try to build a cohesive, persuasive case. They obtained information through five channels: interpersonal relationships people placement (e.g. embedding external staff within client teams); governance (e.g. national directives); copy, adapt and paste (e.g. best practice guidance); and product deployment (e.g. software tools). Furthermore, commissioners constantly interpreted (and reinterpreted) the knowledge to fit local circumstances (contextualisation) and involved others in this refinement process (engagement). External organisations that drew on these multiple channels and facilitated contextualisation and engagement were more likely to meet clients’ expectations. Sometimes there was little impact on commissioning decisions because the work of external organisations targeted and benefited the commissioning decision-makers less than the health-care analysts. The long-standing split between health-care analysts and commissioners sometimes limited the impact of external organisations. The paper concludes that to capitalise on the expertise of external providers, wherever possible, contracts should include explicit skills development and knowledge transfer components.

Making the case for public health interventions: public health spending and return on investment

KING'S FUND, LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2014

These infographics from the King's Fund and the Local Government Association set out key facts about the public health system and the return on investment for some public health interventions. They show the changing demographics with a growing ageing population and the impact of social and behavioural determinants on people’s health. The document also highlights the costs of key health and social services and estimates the potential returns on investment on preventative interventions. For instance, Birmingham’s Be Active programme of free use of leisure centres and other initiatives returned an estimated £23 in quality of life, reduced NHS use and other gains for every £1 spent. Every £1 spent on improving homes saves the NHS £70 over 10 years. Befriending services have been estimated to pay back around £3.75 in reduced mental health service spending and improvements in health for every £1 spent. Every £1 spent on drugs treatment saves society £2.50 in reduced NHS and social care costs and reduced crime.

Safely home: what happens when people leave hospital and care settings?

HEALTHWATCH ENGLAND
2015

Presents the findings from an inquiry into the emotional and physical impact of hospital discharge. With the help of 101 local Healthwatch, the enquiry panel heard from over 3,000 people who shared their stories about their experiences of the discharge process, focusing in particular on older people, homeless people, and people with mental health conditions. The findings reveal that there are five core reasons people feel their departure is not handled properly: people are experiencing delays and a lack of co-ordination between different services; they are feeling left without the services and support they need after discharge; they feel stigmatised and discriminated against and that they are not treated with appropriate respect because of their conditions and circumstances; they feel they are not involved in decisions about their care or given the information they need; and they feel that their full range of needs is not considered. The report includes examples of good practice and initiatives and projects designed to help older people, homeless people, and people with mental health conditions resolve the difficulties they experience during the discharge process.

Dementia friendly communities: guidance for councils

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION, INNOVATIONS IN DEMENTIA
2015

This guidance looks at current best practice and learning in the creation of dementia friendly communities, how it fits within the broader policy landscape, and what actions councils can take, and are already taking in supporting people with dementia by creating local dementia friendly communities. It illustrates how simple changes to existing services, and awareness raising for those who come into day-to-day contact with people with dementia such as staff working in libraries or in leisure centres, can help people with dementia feel more confident and welcome in using council services. The guide looks at what a dementia friendly community is, why dementia is a key issue for councils and the role councils can play. It then presents a framework to help develop to plan, develop and assess the dementia friendliness of any community, organisation or process. The framework covers five domains: the voices of people with dementia and their supporters, the place, the people, resources, and networks. For each domain information is included on: the background to the issue, key actions that councils can take to make this happen, and examples or case studies of existing practice. The guide for those who have a role in leading, planning, commissioning and delivering public services; including health and wellbeing boards, and those responsible for health and social care services.

All our futures: housing for ageing

HOUSING AND AGEING ALLIANCE
2015

This report summarises the key messages from the 2015 Housing and Ageing Summit where leading figures from the sectors came together to map out the actions required to address the critical issue of housing for an ageing population. It was agreed that: housing is fundamental to dignity and security in older age; it underpins health and wellbeing; it is the foundation of a sustainable NHS and social care system and needs to be an equal part of the integration agenda; at a time of unprecedented demographic change, housing, planning, health and social care must all systematically address population ageing; housing plays a critical role in the UK economy - older people live in a third of all homes and are the major driver of household growth.

A call to action: commissioning for prevention

NHS ENGLAND
2013

This document sets out a framework intended to help clinical commissioning groups think about how to commission for effective prevention. Commissioning for prevention is one potentially transformative change that CCGs can make, together with Health and Wellbeing Boards and their other local partners. The paper argues that whether on grounds of health need, cost or public expectations the case for developing a wellness rather than solely an illness service is compelling. This can be achieved by effectively commissioning for prevention through the following steps: analysing the most important health problems at population level; working together with partners and the community, setting common goals or priorities; identifying high-impact prevention programmes focused on the top causes of premature mortality and chronic disability; planning the resource profile needed to deliver prevention goals; and measuring impact and experimenting rapidly.

Collaborative research between Aston Research Centre for Healthy Ageing (ARCHA) and the ExtraCare Charitable Trust: the final report

HOLLAND Carol, et al
2015

Report presenting findings from a longitudinal study to evaluate whether the ExtraCare Charitable Trust housing approach provides positive outcomes for healthy ageing which also results in health and social care cost savings. For the study 162 volunteer new residents were assessed prior to moving into ExtraCare accommodation in the 14 locations on their health, illness, well-being and level of activity. They were then assessed on the same measures at 6, 12 and 18 months after entry. Residents were compared against 39 control participants. The main focuse was to measure health, illness, well-being, activity and personal perceptions .Qualitative data were also collected through focus groups, interviews, and case studies to gather residents views and perceptions. Statistical modelling was used to identify the most important factors in predicting outcome measures of cost. Key findings identified: significant saving for NHS budgets, with total NHS costs reducing by 38% over a 12-month period for residents in the sample; a reduction in the duration of unplanned hospital stays; potential savings in the cost of social care; improvements in residents who were designated as in a 'pre-frail' state on entry to ExtraCare housing; and improvements in residents psychological wellbeing, memory and social interaction.

The NHS in 2030: a vision of a people-powered, knowledge-powered health system

BLAND Jessica
2015

This report explores four big ways that knowledge power and people power will affect the NHS in 2030 and the wider health system, through precision medicine, new forms of health data, people–powered health, and the use of behavioural insights. Section 1, in particular, concentrates on where new kinds of medical information about individuals will come from, as well as how it is interpreted in stratified care. Section 2 moves onto people managing their own health information and new digital platforms for supporting patient–led research and care. Section 3 looks at the possibility of a social movement for health: people being trusted to have a more active role in their own health and to look after others, supported by the NHS, as well as people supporting health services. Section 4 explores how insights into human behaviours can help redesign health services, products and treatments in a way that reflects better how people live their lives and make choices. This is followed by a summary of how these developments will change the function of the NHS. The final sections focus on the challenges involved in getting to the best version of this future and ideas for how these changes can be supported today. Concentrating on the widest gaps between these ideas and current policy, the conclusion includes four proposals that would support new functions in the health system. These are: developing digital platforms and widely agreed protocols for developing new kinds of health knowledge; creating prototypes for health data sharing that concentrate on understanding emerging attitudes to digital privacy; establishing an institution that supports and evaluates people powered health research; and creating a central institution to set standards and mandate processes that will maximise the clinical and research value of large genomic and other data sets as they become available.

Results 181 - 190 of 328

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