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All research records related prevention examples and research

Results 231 - 240 of 328

The bigger picture: policy insights and recommendations

LLOYD James
2014

This report evaluates the performance of government policy on care and support of older people who struggle with day-to-day activities in England during the period 2011 to 2013, using the data and insights from ‘The bigger picture: understanding disability and care in England’s older population’. Part 1 of this report examines the reach of publicly funded support; the unmet need in the older population; and variation and consistency of care and support. Part 2 considers the implications of the Care Act implementation and looks at policy development beyond 2016, focusing on eligible needs after the Act, financial eligibility and the means test after 2016 and mapping, identifying and engaging older population groups. The report concludes that given the feasibility and budget challenges implied by the sheer numbers of older people experiencing difficulties with activities of daily living, a rethink and revolution is required among national and local policymakers around how individuals and families are engaged and supported. This will mean revisiting the balance between consistency and variation in services organised by local authorities, as well as fully integrating and exploiting the different ‘touch points’ and ‘gateways’ available for engaging the older population. It will also mean evaluating which aspects of the vision of the Care Act need to be fulfilled by local authorities directly, or can be devolved to empowered, third-party charities and organisations at a local level.

MDT development: working toward an effective multidisciplinary/multiagency team

NHS ENGLAND
2015

One of three handbooks to support commissioners, GP practices and community health and care professionals in planning and providing personalised care for people living with long term conditions. The handbook brings together information about multi-disciplinary and integrated teams and looks at the types of teams that need to be in place to deliver integrated healthcare. It provides definitions of multi-disciplinary and multi-agency teams and also sets out a tool, the MDT Continuum, that describes different types of care team functioning. Four models or stages of multidisciplinary teams are presented, ranging from from unidisciplinary to transdisciplinary team working. Good practice examples representing each of the stages or models. The final section provide information to help integrated commissioning. Other handbooks published separately cover risk stratification and case finding and personalised care and support planning.

Care Act 2014: a strengths-based approach

SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
2015

One of the aims of the Care Act 2014 is to promote people's wellbeing and independence. By using a strengths-based approach to the assessment process, people can be supported to understand their needs, realise what they can do, and how to best use their skills and networks, to achieve their outcomes. This film looks at what is meant by a strengths-based approach and how practitioners through the assessment process can enable people to be at the centre of their own care and support needs.

Getting better outcomes: personal budgets and older people: follow up report, March 2015

ROUTLEDGE Martin, et al
2015

Presents the latest information about personal budgets for older people, showing that older people experience positive benefits from having a personal budget, although these are not as marked as for other groups. The first section reflects briefly on recent changes to the policy context and then highlights new data about the performance of councils from the recent 2014 ADASS survey, and the third National Personal Budget survey from In Control. It then draws on research and recent TLAP events, which considered minimum processes and self-directed support, to review what does and doesn't work best for older people. The second section of this report presents some examples of what councils are doing to address the ongoing challenges both of the initial report and the current policy context. The case studies are summarised in Table. Section 3 examines personalisation and safeguarding, and specifically, whether personal budgets increase risks to older people whilst section 4 considers integration and the opportunities that government policy affords older people in relation to personalisation. In its conclusion, the report recommends that there needs to be further evidence of what is being done to support the use of personal budgets by older people.

Inclusive integration: how whole person care can work for adults with disabilities

BROADBRIDGE Angela
2014

This report focusses on meeting the needs of working-age disabled adults as health and social care services are increasing integrated. It provides an empirical evidence base to demonstrate how whole person care (which is about making the connections between physical health, mental health and social care services) can be used to effectively meet these needs. The report also draws on the findings of a focus group with 12 disabled adults and carers on desired outcomes from the integration of health and social care services. Interviews with social care and voluntary sector professionals, commissioners and local authority policy to see if they are willing to include working-age disabled adults' needs in plans for future integration. The report looks at how working-age disabled adults have different needs and outcomes from older people and identifies the health inequalities they face in day-to-day life. Ten dimensions of health inequality are identified including housing, employment, financial security and quality of life. The report makes seven recommendations to inform the service response, including: taking a long term view of managing long-term conditions, viewing whole person care as a 10-year journey with matched by stable funding; debates on funding gap in social care should give consideration to the needs of working-age disabled adults; shifting resources from case management to community coordinated care to support prevention and providing a single point of contact for health and social care needs; service integration should take place across a much wider range of services to meet the needs of disabled people.

Avoiding unhappy returns: radical reductions in readmissions, achieved with volunteers

ROYAL VOLUNTARY SERVICE
2014

A summary of the achievements of the Royal Voluntary Service Hospital 2 Home service during its first year. Leicestershire County Council launched the scheme in hospitals in six districts, including the three university hospitals in Leicester in summer 2012. The service provides practical help and support following a discharge from hospital; helps users to regain confidence and reduce anxiety; reduces social isolation; promotes independent living and choice; helps users to maintain day to day activities; provides information/signpost to other organisations; and helps prevent readmissions to hospital. Designed to be short-term, friendly and confidential and people-centred, the service is provided free of charge and is normally available for up to six weeks. Over 600 people have been referred. Among the participants readmission rates to hospital have been very low, with readmissions of older people approximately half national rates.

Promising approaches: to reducing loneliness and isolation in later life

JOPLING Kate
2015

This report raises concerns that loneliness and social isolation among older people is becoming a serious public health issue. It draws on the views of experts and research evidence to set out a new framework for understanding and tackling loneliness in older people. The approach is based around three key challenges: reaching individuals; understanding the specific circumstances of an individual's loneliness; and supporting individuals to take up services that would help. Sections of the report cover: the foundation services (reaching, understanding and supporting individuals); the types of intervention that are most likely to meet older people's need for social contact; how technology and transport can facilitate social connection; and 'structural enablers' focusing on how services are delivered (i.e., at neighbourhood level, community development, volunteering, and age positive approaches). It also highlights areas where a greater understanding of how to address loneliness within the older community is needed: within care settings; in black and minority ethnic groups; and with lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans older people. Case studies are used throughout to demonstrate the variety of solutions needed to address a very personal and individual problem. Includes specific recommendations for service providers, commissioners and those involved with search.

Preventing Crisis for Carers: a Princess Royal Trust for Carers' programme funded by the Moffat Charitable Trust: final evaluation report

KELLY Timothy B., et al
2010

An independent evaluation of the Crisis Prevention Programme, which comprised four individual pilot projects operating in four NHS board areas in Scotland and aimed to get support and advice for carers at an early stage, offer them a carer's assessment, reduce the pressure on their health, get them involved in discharge planning and train health and social care professionals in carer awareness. The evaluation found that the programme resulted in many improvements in hospitals, including: professionals were more likely to identify carers at an early stage and put support for them in place at an earlier stage; there were changes to ways of working which benefited carers; carers reported feeling that professionals had more recognition of their expertise in caring and understood their needs as a carer; carers felt more able to have a say in shaping the services they, or the person they cared for, received; and carers were provided with more information, such as being told of their right to a carer's assessment. The evaluation recommended that funding for carer support workers in hospitals continues and that carer awareness training should be mandatory for all healthcare professionals.

Local area coordination: from service users to citizens

BROAD Ralph
2012

An exploration of how local area coordination can support people to pursue their vision for a good life, build stronger communities and help reform care services in England and Wales. Local area coordinators, from within their own local communities, provide information, advice and support to help people to solve their own problems. Instead of focusing on deficits, they help people focus on their own vision for a good life, building on their own assets and relationships and acting as a bridge to communities. The model is built on seven key principles, which include: citizenship; relationships; information; the gifts that each member of the community can bring; expertise; leadership; and services as a back up to natural support. The report argues that local area coordination offers the chance for the whole service system to rebalance itself and to focus on local solutions and stronger communities, whilst also offering a powerful catalyst to wider social care system reform.

Preventing loneliness and social isolation in older people

COLLINS Emma
2014

This Insight looks specifically at the prevention of isolation and loneliness amongst older people, with a particular focus on what practitioners in the fields of health and social care should bear in mind when working to tackle this important and growing issue. It highlights the findings from past research and and evidence about what works, summarises the key characteristics of successful interventions, looks at how they relate to the prevention agenda, and the particular role health and social care professionals can play.

Results 231 - 240 of 328

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