#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#

Find prevention records by subject or service provider/commissioner name

  • Key to icons

    • Journal Prevention service example
    • Book Book
    • Digital media Digital media
    • Journal Journal article
    • Free resource Free resource

All research records related prevention examples and research

Results 241 - 250 of 421

Quick guide: technology in care homes

NHS ENGLAND, et al
2015

This quick guide highlights a number of case studies from around the country where technology is being used successfully to enhance the delivery of care to support independent living (telecare), to enhance the health and wellbeing information exchange between patients and professionals (telehealth) and to enhance the information exchange between professionals (telemedicine). It also includes information about secure email and collaboration. Drawing on the case studies, the guide sets out a series of top tips for developing and implementing successful technological initiatives.

Quick guide: better use of care at home

NHS ENGLAND, et al
2015

This quick guide provides case studies, ideas and practical tips to commissioners, health professionals and care providers on how to improve the relationships, processes and use of homecare and housing support to help people home from hospital. Care at home and housing support enables people to live independently and well in their preferred environment for longer, providing continuity and familiarity through frequent close contact. It plays an essential role in helping people return home, which should always be seen as the default option. The guide identifies common problems experienced and highlights good solutions which are already being implemented, that can be instigated quickly and effectively, focusing on three elements of a patient’s pathway: 1) planning for discharge home on arrival at hospital; 2) enabling people to go home with appropriate support; 3) and helping people to stay at home.

A shared life is a healthy life: how the Shared Lives model of care can improve health outcomes and support the NHS

SHARED LIVES PLUS
2015

Explains how Shared Lives schemes support people with health needs, making use of community based solutions which can be more cost effective than traditional institutional care. In Shared Lives, an adult (and sometimes a 16/17 year old) who needs support and/or accommodation moves in with or regularly visits an approved Shared Lives carer, after they have been matched for compatibility. Together they share family and community life. Half of the 12,000 UK citizens using Shared Lives are living with their carer as part of a supportive household; half visit their carer for day support or overnight breaks. Shared Lives is also used as a stepping stone for an individual to possibly become fully independent. The report demonstrates that this approach can provide care at lower cost; improves people’s health; reduces pressure on health services; and reduces inequalities in health service provision.

Building contingent capacity: shifting power in organisations to become more responsive to the people they serve

KAUR-STUBBS Sukhvinder
2015

This paper sets out research to understand and work within the emerging landscape in which organisations find that the people they serve acquire greater prominence among their multiple stakeholders and power gradients have to adjust accordingly. Respect for the dignity of people and how organisations respond to their needs, wishes, gifts and aspirations are becoming pivotal. Drawing on a survey and participation of 20 sector leaders at a roundtable hosted by the University of Birmingham and funded by the Barrow Cadbury Trust, the research proposes a framework for organisations to review and, if necessary, restate the priority given to people (commonly called users), develop practice that encourages reciprocity in the design and delivery of products and services, and establish processes that are pervious and accountable to people and their networks. At the core of the framework is the concept of contingent capacity. Contingent capacity is purposeful, distributive and empowers workers (staff and volunteers), to listen to and respect people and, inspire their participation. The approach comprises three stages, which include: Purpose and Power – against a backdrop of more assertive citizens and a changing socio-economic environment, reviewing how the organisation continues to respect the dignity of the people it serves and ensures they are able to contribute to decisions that affect them; Reciprocal Engagement – recalibrating practice and culture to give greater priority to people and encourage deep and iterative engagement; and Outcome Plus – ensuring processes optimise value, not just to the organisation but, also, to the people and the wider communities around them.

Community capital: the value of connected communities

PARSFIELD Matthew, et al
2015

The final report of the Connected Communities for Mental Wellbeing and Social Inclusion programme, which looked at how different interventions can contribute to the development of resilient, inclusive communities with higher wellbeing. This report examines how interventions affect relationships and attitudes, and how relationships and attitudes affect individuals' and communities' ability to develop social value. The programme involved a survey residents in seven ward-sized localities, an analysis of the data for insight into local social networks and wellbeing, and work with local people to develop projects to support social connections. Results found that community-led action and targeted interventions can strengthen local communities and lead to substantial benefits. It is argued that by investing in interventions which build and strengthen networks of social relationships, four kinds of social value or ‘dividend’ shared by people in the community will develop: wellbeing, citizenship, capacity, and an economic dividend through improved employability and health.

Putting older people first: our vision for the next five years. A whole system approach to meeting housing, health and wellbeing outcomes for our older populations in South West England

OXFORD BROOKES UNIVERSITY. Institute of Public Care
2015

This document by the South West Housing LIN leadership sets out a vision for a whole system approach to meeting housing, health and wellbeing outcomes for the older population in South West England over the next 5 years. It highlights: the aims and objectives of the group; specific issues facing the sector in the region; and examples of innovative practice and the group’s priorities over the next 5 years. These include: supporting initiatives which contribute to more integrated approaches to service design and delivery; promoting the development of new models of care based in and around the housing services, taking the opportunities these present to develop community based, local services and highlight the benefits of taking co-productive and inclusive approaches to service design; building an evidence base which shows how housing and housing related services contribute to the wider health and social care agenda, through prevention, as well as supporting the management of long term conditions; raising awareness around dementia, including how housing organisations can enable people living with dementia, and their carers, to live independently within the community; and raising awareness about the potential that technologies offer in supporting older people to live independently, and seeking to address the barriers to wider adoption.

Collaboration readiness: why it matters, how to build it, and where to start

KIPPIN Henry, BILLIALD Sarah
2015

Examines the role of cross-sector collaboration in ensuring the sustainability of public services, focusing on building readiness to deliver collaborative services to the public. The report introduces a Collaboration Readiness Index, bringing together lessons from work with local, national and international public service agencies that are trying to work differently with others to manage future demand and improve social outcomes on the ground. The index comprises six categories, designed to capture and measure the readiness and capacity of: collaborative citizens; collaborative systems; collaborative services; collaborative places; collaborative markets; and collaborative behaviours. This conceptual framework is supported through a more granular focus on 12 collaborative indicators, developed from a practice base and illustrated through case studies. The indicators are: readiness to engage; service user influence; collaborative outcomes; system risk and resilience; cross-sector delivery; demand management capability; place-based insight; civic and community collaboration; collaborative commissioning; provider-side innovation; cross-sector leadership; and behaviour change.

Getting serious about prevention: enabling people to stay out of hospital at the end of life

GREY Andrew
2015

This report sets out key steps that commissioners can take in collaboration with service providers to enable people who are approaching the end of life to avoid being admitted to hospital when this is possible and appropriate, as well as enabling those who are admitted to make a transition to a community setting quickly. The report argues that as well as reducing the costs to the NHS, enabling people to stay out of hospital at the end of life can make a significant difference to the experiences of dying people and their families. The report makes a number of recommendations for commissioners, service providers and health and social care staff, including: commissioning the increased provision of 24/7 care in community settings, through care homes and hospices, and community health and social care services that can provide care in people’s homes; commissioning anticipatory prescribing of medicines for people approaching the end of life; using available funding, through System Resilience Groups, the Better Care Fund, and Integrated Personal Commissioning, to improve co-ordination between hospitals and community settings, including hospices, for people approaching the end of life; and health and social care staff identifying carers of people who are approaching the end of life and referring them for local authority assessments.

Supporting the independence of older people: are councils doing enough?

THOMAS Huw Vaughan
2015

This report examines how effective councils in Wales have been in providing strategic leadership on older person’s issues. It analyses the Welsh Government’s and councils’ budgets, looking at the range and availability of preventative services across Wales, focusing on four core aspects that support older people to continue to live independently: practical support services; community based facilities; advice and information services; and housing and housing based services. The report also assesses councils’ performance management arrangements for overseeing services to older people, examining the information that is used by councils to judge performance. The review argues that Councils’ strategies and leadership focus too much on delivery of social services and do not always recognise the important contribution that other services can make in supporting and sustaining the independence of older people. Despite some innovative examples of councils supporting older people, the wider preventative services that can help reduce demand for health and social services are undervalued. A lack of data is making it difficult for councils to demonstrate the impact of their services in supporting the independence of older people, and this weakens their decision making and scrutiny when setting future priorities.

Prevention: a shared commitment: making the case for a Prevention Transformation Fund

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2015

This document identifies and collates key pieces of evidence about the cost effectiveness of prevention in order to make the case for greater investment in prevention interventions. The report recommends that the Government should introduce a Prevention Transformation Fund, worth at least £2 billion annually. This would enable some double running of new investment in preventative services alongside ‘business as usual’ in the current system, until savings can be realised and reinvested into the system – as part of wider local prevention strategies. Based on the analysis of an extensive range of intervention case studies that have provided a net cost benefit, the report suggests that investment in prevention could yield a net return of 90 per cent.

Results 241 - 250 of 421

#EXCLUDE#
News

My Guide: new case example

My Guide: new case example My Guide is a sighted guiding service, started by The Guide Dogs for the Blind Association (Guide Dogs), in which trained volunteers assist blind and partially sighted adults to get out and about, thus helping to prevent social isolation.
View more: News
Ask about support on integration, STPs and transformation
ENQUIRE
Related SCIE content
Related NICE content
Related external content
Visit Social Care Online, the UK’s largest database of information and research on all aspects of social care and social work.
SEARCH NOW
Submit prevention service example
SUBMIT
What do you think about SCIE's work?
FEEDBACK
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#