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All research records related prevention examples and research

Results 251 - 260 of 446

Growing old together: sharing new ways to support older people

COMMISSION ON IMPROVING URGENT CARE FOR OLDER PEOPLE
2016

Final report from the Commission on Improving Urgent Care for Older People which provides guidance for those involved in designing care for older people and outlines eight key principles the health and care sector can adopt to improve urgent care for older people. The Commission was established out of a concern that the care system was not meeting the needs of older people, resulting in lower quality of care, a lack of out-of-hospital services as an alternative to A&E, not enough focus on prevention and early intervention, and delayed transfers of care. It brought together a range of experts, received over 60 evidence submissions; carried out visits to sites using innovative ways to deliver care; consulted with NHS Confederation members and patient and carer groups; and commissioned an evidence review. The report draws on the evidence to look at the case for change. It then outlines eight key principles that can be used when redesigning health and social care system: start with care driven by the person’s needs and personal goals; a greater focus on proactive care; acknowledge current strains on the system and allow time to think; the importance of care co-ordination and navigation; greater use of multi-disciplinary and multi-agency teams; ensure workforce, training and core skills reflect modern day requirements; leadership should encourage us to do things differently; and metrics must truly reflect the care experience for older people. Short case studies of innovative practice are included in the report, covering acute and primary care, voluntary sector and local government partners and commissioners.

People helping people: year two of the pioneer programme

NHS ENGLAND
2016

Describes the journey taken over the last year by the integrated care pioneers. The 25 pioneer sites are developing and testing new and different ways of joining up health and social care services across England, utilising the expertise of the voluntary and community sector, with the aim of improving care, quality and effectiveness of services being provided. The report describes the progress, challenges and lessons learnt across the pioneers. A number of key themes have emerged, including: population segmentation to determine people’s characteristics, their needs and care demands; using the experience of people; providing proactive care; providing integrated care services; supporting integration through using shared care records; using technology to support different access points; analysing impacts through data; and removing financial disincentives. Also included within the report are pioneers’ stories which describe the core elements of their care models and showcase how these are impacting real people.

Place-based health: a position paper

STUDDERT Jessica, STOPFORTH Sarah
2015

This position paper sets out some of the challenges in achieving a fundamental structural shift in the health system, citing new evidence from health and local government professionals. The paper sets out the potential of reimagining health as place-based, taking an asset-based approach and focusing on shaping demands in the longer term and ultimately producing better health and wellbeing outcomes. Underpinning this approach is the recognition of the wider determinants of health, where fewer health outcomes result from clinical treatment and the majority are determined by wider factors such as lifestyle choices, the physical environment and family and social networks. Place-based health would mean reconceptualising ‘health’ from something that happens primarily within institutions, to involve all local assets and stakeholders in a shift towards something that all parts of the community, and individuals themselves, recognise and feel part of. This would mean the individual would move from being a recipient of interventions from separate institutions to being at the heart of place-based health. The paper intends to lay out the challenge for the Place-Based Health Commission, which will report in March 2016 and recommend practical steps for professionals in health and care to overcome organisational barriers – real and perceived – and make a fundamental shift towards an integrated system that puts people at the heart of it.

The role of case studies as evidence in public health

KORJONEN Helena, et al
2016

This study uses a mixed methods approach, comprising a literature review, a content analysis of a sample of case studies and a small number of qualitative interviews on the use and usefulness of case studies, to define, explore and make recommendations around the nature and use of case studies in public health. It suggests that case studies capture local knowledge of programmes and services, and illustrate processes and outcomes that cannot be captured in other ways, and that this is what makes them valuable. The report argues that case studies would benefit from guidelines and templates to improve the format, replicability and assessment and that they would benefit from a higher rating in evidence hierarchies as they often describe complex interventions, implementation and different contexts.

Collaborative healthcare: supporting CCGs and HWBs to support integrated personal commissioning and collaborative care

INCLUSIVE CHANGE
2015

A short guide providing new approaches and practice examples of how Clinical Commissioning Groups and Health Wellbeing Boards can commission and support interventions which embody the principles of collaborative care, individual choice and control and patient and public participation. The six approaches presented are: Experts by experience and self-advocacy; Self-directed support and personal health budgets; Capabilities and asset-based approaches to health and care; Co-production and citizen led commissioning; Community development and building social capital; and Networked models of care. Each includes accompanying practice examples. The guide has been produced by the Inclusive Change partnership of Shared Lives Plus, Community Catalysts, In Control, Inclusion North and Inclusive Neighbourhoods.

Our communities, our mental health: commissioning for better public mental health

MIND
2015

This guide provides a background to public mental health, examining what it is, prevention types and risk factors, why it should be invested in and how to target interventions most effectively. The document sets out a framework of principles and good practice for designing and commissioning public mental health programmes, which include: work in partnership; understand your community and who is at high-risk; monitor and evaluate impacts; commission interventions across the life course; and address both physical and mental health. A range of practical case studies are provided to help commission successful public mental health programmes in local areas.

Improving the health and wellbeing of communities

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION
2014

This paper is part of the ‘Tailor-made’ series, which aims to demonstrate the valuable contribution that the community sector makes to people’s lives and society as a whole. Specifically, this paper explores the significant role that community groups play in improving the health and wellbeing of communities. Key points include: the community sector is well placed to support wellness, rather than just treat illness through connecting organisations and supporting people with wider factors that affect health, including poverty, education and social isolation; the community sector has unique qualities that allow it to provide tailor-made support - they are trusted and understand the needs of their community, they can reach people that find it hard to access traditional support and they take a person-centred approach meaning they can support people’s multiple-needs; the community sector contributes significant social and economic value by improving physical and mental health, improving quality of life and reducing health inequalities. The paper also forms part of the full report 'Tailor-made: how community groups improve people’s lives.'

Measuring mental wellbeing in children and young people

BRYANT Gillian, HEARD Heather, WATSON Jo
2015

This document outlines the importance of measuring mental wellbeing in children and young people. It is intended to provide guidance on the use of targeted, evidence driven intelligence and practical support to those wishing to develop local joint strategic needs assessments (JSNAs) and the evaluation of interventions which improve the mental wellbeing of children and young people. In particular, the briefing examines what children and young people’s mental wellbeing is, and why is it important; it describes some of the tools which are currently available to measure mental wellbeing and identify its determinants; it discusses risk and protective factors; and explains how using intelligence can improve children and young people’s outcomes. The technical appendix has measures to quantify mental wellbeing and its determinants, information on using the measures and links to examples of evidence based practice.

Resilience in practice

WALKER Andrew
2015

This paper looks at what resilience means for local authorities and offers guidance for councils in their thinking about the subject. Resilience in this context is defined as the capacity of local areas to respond to immediate crises, to build their resources and adapt to changing circumstances in the future. The paper is based on an in-depth workshop with participants from local government across England, interviews with council officers with responsibility for resilience issues, and case studies that demonstrate some of the innovative approaches that could be taken to enable resilience. The paper begins by summarising existing understandings and definitions of resilience; discusses the issues and concerns that local authorities have with resilience; then looks at some of the ways they are seeking to develop it in their areas. Case examples include a project to develop community resilience in Hounslow and Family Group Conference programme in Camden which contributes to family resilience. The second section outlines a definition and typology of resilience and then applies the typology to the example of climate change. It then proposes a checklist that authorities could follow when developing resilience strategies and interventions. The paper stresses the importance of local authorities working with communities and individuals in partnership to make places more resilient, helping communities use their assets effectively and bringing about holistic change in the way communities function.

The district council contribution to public health: a time of challenge and opportunity

BUCK David, DUNN Phoebe
2015

A contribution to the understanding, assessment and development of the role of district councils in improving the health of their citizens and communities. The report sets out what determines health, why district councils have an important role to play in shaping it, and the public health system and policy context in which district councils operate. It describes the key areas in which district council functions contribute to public health and provides a quick guide to the high level economics of public health for district councils. In addition, the report presents key evidence, including the impact on health, effectiveness and, where available, cost-effectiveness and return on investment, for each of the core functions of housing, green space and leisure, and environmental health services, arguing that district councils’ wider enabling role, in economic development, planning and engaging with their communities has benefits for health. A number of short case studies of innovation in service delivery in relation to health and wellbeing are also included. In the final section the report outlines a set of high-level recommendations for district councils and other stakeholders to ensure that they take advantage of the opportunities on offer.

Results 251 - 260 of 446

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