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All research records related prevention examples and research

Results 281 - 290 of 498

Making the change: behavioural factors in person- and community-centred approaches for health and wellbeing

BURD Hannah, HALLSWORTH Michael
2016

This report explores the behavioural science theories that suggest new ways of enabling people and communities to take a more active role in managing their own health and provides an accessible introduction to the theories of change. The report is structured around the three areas of capability, opportunity and motivation which researchers have identified as needing to be present for behaviour to occur. It highlights that a multi-faceted approach is needed to enable effective self-care. It identifies five enabling factors that that can influence engagement and self-management behaviours: a growth mindset where people view capabilities as something that can be developed, removing ‘friction costs’, social networks, motivation and goal setting. It also suggests how these factors can be targeted in order to encourage these behaviours. Examples and case studies illustrate the application of the theories. The report is aimed at policymakers, commissioners, service designers and organisations working to promote more person- and community-centred approaches for health and wellbeing.

Developing a wellbeing and strengths-based approach to social work practice: changing culture

GOLLINS Tim, et al
2016

This report discusses the need to for social workers in adult social care to change their workforce culture to one that is 'strengths-based' for promoting well-being, early intervention and prevention. It examines the value of this approach in creating better outcomes for people living more actively in their local communities, generating greater satisfaction for people using services and their carers; and creating a motivated workforce. The report then sets out the key knowledge and skills the social care workforce needs to apply strengths-based approaches in improving people’s lives. It also considers the emerging business case for how a community-focused strengths-based approach can deliver efficiencies for the sector. Cases study examples from Shropshire, Essex County Council, Hertfordshire and Calderdale show how councils and their health partners are developing new ways of working to deliver an alternative health and social care operating model.

Altogether Better working together to create healthier people and communities: bringing citizens and services together in new conversations

ALTOGETHER BETTER
2015

An evaluation report of the Altogether Better Wellbeing 2 Programme, working with citizens and services keen to find new ways to improve the health and well-being of their local community. Through the two year programme, funded by the Big Lottery Fund, people were invited to become health champions, they were then nurtured as a group and encouraged to take action to improve local health and well-being in ways that their local NHS or statutory services wanted to support. The report finds that champions, and participants in the groups and activities that they have run, have benefited significantly from their involvement in a wide range of activities; with over 98 per cent reporting increased involvement in social activities and social groups and over 86 per cent reporting increased levels of confidence, well-being and new knowledge related to health and well-being. The NHS and statutory organisations have come to a greater recognition of the resourcefulness and generosity of the citizens who use their services. They are beginning to recognise that it is legitimate and effective for them to divert more of their time and resources into supporting volunteers who themselves support the health and well-being of their communities. This in turn raises the possibility of these organisations radically changing the way they provide services. The report concludes by arguing that the success of the approach depends critically on the quality of the working relationship between health champions and their organisation and that there are grounds for optimism, as a result of these relationships, that support for health champions will be sustainable into the long term, becoming simply ‘how we do things round here’.

Social value of local area coordination in Derby: a forecast social return on investment analysis for Derby City Council

MARSH Hannah
2016

Presents the findings of a forecast analysis of the social value of local area coordination in Derby. The aim of local area coordination is to support residents in the local community to ‘get a life, not a service’, empowering individuals to find community based solutions instead of relying on services. The analysis demonstrates that over the three year forecast period with 10 local area coordinators, local area coordination would deliver significant social value with up to £4 of value for every £1 invested. Further expansion of the service to 17 local area coordinators across all wards would see this value increase further with an increased number of individuals receiving the support. The report highlights that local area coordination is delivering significant benefit to individuals in the community by increasing their overall health and wellbeing. In addition, other stakeholders and the wider community also benefit from local area coordination with community groups forming to address need and benefiting from the promotion through coordinators. The report sets out key recommendations to further optimise the social value created through this service and to better capture the impact and inform future evaluations.

Mental health and housing

SAVAGE Jonny
2016

This study examines how different types of supported accommodation meet the needs of people with mental health problems. Supported accommodation covers a wide range of different types of housing, including intensive 24 hour support, hostel accommodation, and accommodation with only occasional social support or assistance provided. The document focuses on five approaches to providing supported accommodation, including: Care Support Plus; integrated support; housing support for people who have experienced homeless; complex needs; low-level step down accommodation; and later life. The report draws on the expertise of people living and working in these services across England, and presents their views of both building and service related issues. It sets out a number of recommendations, focusing on: quality; co-production; staff recruitment and training; policy informed practice; and resourced, appropriate accommodation.

Local area coordination: catalyst for a system wide prevention approach

MCELENEY Maureen, BILLINGHAM Les
2016

Examines the role of local area coordination as a driver for positive systems change. Local area coordination is a personal, human approach to supporting individuals and families to build resilience, relationships and contribution and reduce demand for, and dependence on, services. It also nurtures more welcoming, inclusive and supportive communities and creates the conditions for wider systems change. The report argues that local area coordination works as a driving force for transformation and prevention in three significant ways: person-centred prevention, through building individual, family and community resilience through self-sufficiency and mutual support; behavioural prevention, by helping to produce culture and behaviour change across such diverse groups as social workers, health and housing professionals as well as others, including the fire service; and structural prevention, bringing together the strengths and assets within and across communities, individuals and groups to ensure that available help is utilised effectively. The document also looks at how local area coordination links to other prevention models and sectors, including: ‘Living Well’ programme; social prescribing; housing; employment; and commissioning/market development.

Evaluation of Music in Mind: findings to date

NEW ECONOMY
2014

This report details the interim findings of the evaluation of the third phase of the Music in Mind (MiM) project. MiM is a music therapy group run by Manchester Camerata that offers free music therapy sessions for people with dementia (PWD) and their carers. The sessions aim to improve the quality of life and wellbeing of the attendees through music making. The report provides a brief introduction to the MiM project and summarises the findings of a literature review. It then presents the participants’ views of the MiM, as recorded in their diaries or communicated through interviews, and discusses key findings. The key themes that emerge from the evaluation are linked to the mood of the service users: feeling calmer, happier, energised and/or relaxed. Improvements were also noted in PWD’s memory and recollection, confidence levels and relationships with carers. However the extent of other benefits appears to vary greatly depending on the type of dementia the service users’ are living with and the severity of their symptoms. The findings of this evaluation seem to be in line with the literature, suggesting that MIM appears to promote general wellbeing amongst participants and have a positive impact on relationships.

Report on the DFG summit: hosted by the College of Occupational Therapists and Foundations in December 2015

ASTRAL PUBLIC SERVICES
2016

A summary of the main points raised at the Disabled Facilities Grant summit together with some apposite case studies showing what works well now. Disabled facilities grants are a national housing grant available to adults and children with a disability to facilitate access to and within the property. The grant is available to all owner occupiers, private and housing association tenants subject to a statutory means test. The meeting discussed five key questions about DFGs and their context within the wider theme of people remaining independent in the community, regardless of their means. The questions are: what works well in current practice; how to improve customer service; how to support self-funders; how to collaborate better with other services; and how to redesign services for the future. The document closes with major themes that emerged from the day together with some key recommendations of what can be changed nationally and locally to advance collaborative systems, prevention and DFG regulations.

Social prescribing: a review of community referral schemes

THOMSON Linda J., CAMIC Paul M., CHATTERJEE Helen J.
2015

Sets the scene for the conditions under which social prescribing has arisen and considers the efficacy of different referral options. Social prescribing is a non-medical intervention linking patients with social, emotional or practical needs to a range of local, non-clinical services. The review provides definitions, models and notable examples of social prescribing schemes and assesses the means by which and the extent to which these schemes have been evaluated. Models outlined in this review include: Arts on Prescription, Books on Prescription, Education on Prescription, Exercise on Prescription, Green Gyms, Healthy Living Initiatives, Information Prescriptions, Museums on Prescription, Social Enterprise Schemes, Supported Referral, and Time Banks. The report makes recommendations for practice, policy and future research, focusing on best practice guidance for sector workers, frameworks for setting up social prescribing schemes, and methods for evaluating social prescribing schemes.

At the heart of health: realising the value of people and communities

WOOD Suzanne, et al
2016

This report explores the value of people and communities at the heart of health, in support of the NHS Five Year Forward View vision to develop a new relationship with people and communities. It seeks to bring together in one place a wide range of person- and community-centred approaches for health and wellbeing. It provides an overview of the existing evidence base with a particular focus on the potential benefits of adopting these approaches. The report suggests that there is evidence from research and practice to demonstrate the benefits of person- and community-centred approaches, across three dimensions of value: mental and physical health and wellbeing – these approaches have been shown to increase people’s self-efficacy and confidence to manage their health and care, improve health outcomes and experience, to reduce social isolation and loneliness, and build community capacity and resilience, among other outcomes; NHS sustainability – these approaches can impact how people use health and care services and can lead to reduced demand on services, particularly emergency admissions and A&E visits; and wider social outcomes: these approaches can lead to a wide range of social outcomes, from improving employment prospects and school attendance to increasing volunteering. They also can potentially contribute to reducing health inequalities for individuals and communities. The report includes an outline of the ‘Realising the Value’ programme, which is designed to develop the field of person- and community-centred approaches for health and wellbeing by building the evidence base and developing tools, resources and networks to support the spread and increase the impact of key approaches.

Results 281 - 290 of 498

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