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All research records related prevention examples and research

Results 311 - 320 of 334

AT and telecare to manage fire risks in the homes of older and vulnerable people

DOUGHTY Kevin, ORTON Mike
2014

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to identify opportunities where technology interventions could help manage the risks associated with fire and explosions in homes of people who are older or who are vulnerable through other causes such as mental health problems or a history of substance abuse. Design/methodology/approach: The approach focused on reviewing the latest available statistics in order to identify the major causes and rooms in which fire accidents occurred. Findings: The authors found that the number of incidents and fatalities continues to decrease as a result of preventive measures such as a greater use of smoke detectors, but that there remained issues with cooking safety. New products for limiting damage and managing risks are available which could have a positive impact. Research limitations/implications: The paper concludes that the challenges are making both professionals and the public aware of the available technologies and of introducing them following appropriate assessment of needs and risks. Practical implications: Greater resources need to be offered for training of the public and of health and safety professionals. Further funding may be needed to implement the introduction of new technology. Originality/value: This is the most up-to-date review of fire control measures employing assistive technology and telecare for domestic properties and will be of value to community health teams, adults care organisations, housing associations and other public bodies.

Transforming integrated care – using telecare as a catalyst for change

THOMPSON Frances
2012

This article discusses how to successfully mainstream telecare to transform service delivery and provide more preventative and personalised care for people of all ages and abilities. Based on experiences from the city of Wakefield, a metropolitan district of West Yorkshire, England, the article explores the use of technology and support systems, such as door sensors, smoke detectors or flood sensors, to assist vulnerable people by improving and improving well-being and maintaining independence, enabling individuals to live safely and securely at home for as long as possible. Alongside the management of adults and older people, telecare has also had a positive impact on the support of people with learning disabilities. The article concludes that to successfully integrate and mainstream telecare, there needs to be adequate training and assessment for all staff involved in the implementation in order to deliver a sustainable and deliverable telecare service. Overall, the cost efficiencies were crucial when considering the future of telecare and, with significant cost savings made over a relatively short period, the potential for future investments was a significant factor for the continuing delivery of services.

Art in recovery: from participation to independence

ASTON Tracy
2013

Purpose: This paper aims to describe a partnership visual arts project between Richmond Fellowship (a national mental health charity) and the Bluecoat arts centre in Liverpool involving participants with mental health problems. Design/methodology/approach: The paper details the development of the project since September 2010 and, most importantly, the artistic development of the individuals who are still taking part and the improvements in their mental health and wellbeing. It also describes the development of the group in becoming an independent organisation. Findings: Evaluation was undertaken at regular intervals through wellbeing questionnaires, one-to-one interviews and observation, which led to the following findings: with support, individuals with mental health problems experience significant benefit in engaging with the arts, to their mental health, their personal development and development as artists. Given time, they require less support and are willing to take on responsibilities, which has enabled them to become an independent organisation. Social implications: This paper makes the case for the effectiveness of partnership working between mental health and arts organisations to improve mental health and social inclusion. Originality/value: The paper adds to the body of evidence concerning the use of arts in recovery and of use to mental health organisations who are interested in using the arts in the process of support.

Creating a recovery focused workforce: supporting staff well-being and valuing the expertise of lived experience

WALKER Liz, PERKINS Rachel, REPPER Julie
2014

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to argue that if mental health services are to genuinely support the recovery of those who they serve then recovery principles must permeate all facets of the organisation, in particular human resources and workforce development. Design/methodology/approach: This paper draws on the principles of recovery-focused approaches to people who use services and explores how these might guide a recovery-focused approaches to human resources and workforce issues. Findings: The recovery principles like recognising and utilising the expertise of lived experience, co-production and shared decision making, peer support, focusing on strengths and becoming an expert in your own self-care all have as much relevance for creating a recovery-focused workforce as they do in the recovery journeys of those who use services. Everyone who uses services is “more than a mental patient” and everyone who provides services is “more than a mental health practitioner” – we need to use all the assets that everyone brings. Originality/value: Although there has been a great deal of discussion about the features of recovery-focused services, there has been little, if any, consideration of extending the principles of recovery to human resources. The aim of this paper is not to offer a blue print but to begin an exploration of what a recovery-focused approach to workforce issues might look like.

Mental health recovery is social

HOLTTUM Sue
2014

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to summarise two 2014 research papers that highlight the role of social interactions and the social world in recovery in the context of mental distress. Design/methodology/approach: The author summarise two papers: one is about two theories from social psychology that help us understand social identity – our sense of who we are. The other brings together and looks at the similarities and differences between ten different therapies that can be called resource-oriented – that is, they focus on people's strengths and resources rather than what is wrong with them. Findings: The paper on social identity gives a convincing case for incorporating teaching about social identity – and the social groups to which people belong – into the training of mental health professionals. The paper on resource-oriented therapies suggests that social relationships are a main component of all ten therapies examined. This second paper suggested a need for more research and theory relating to resource-oriented therapies. Social identity theory could help address this issue. Mental health services may be able to help people more by focusing on their established and desired social identities and group-belonging, and their strengths, than is usual. Originality/value: These two papers seem timely given the growing recognition of the role of social factors in the development and maintenance of mental distress. More attention to social factors in recovery could help make it more self-sustaining.

Recovery-focused practice in mental health

LEESE Daniela, SMITHIES Lynda, GREEN Julie
2014

This article aims to identify service users and nurses perspectives on recovery -focused practice through themes in the literature. Seven studies and two reflective articles were selected for consideration. Three common themes emerged as essential nursing characteristics needed for recovery-focused practice: hope, person-centred care and consideration of service users' perspective. Recommendations on how practice could be improved are suggested from these themes. Key points include involving family members in care, involving service users in decisions, and spending time with service users to aid recovery.

Creative practice as mutual recovery in mental health

CRAWFORD Paul, et al
2013

This article reviews the literature review to examine the value of approaches to mental health based on creative practice in the humanities and arts, and explore these in relation to the potential contribution to mutual recovery. It found recovery can embrace carers and practitioners as well as sufferers from mental health problems. Divisions tend to exist between those with mental health needs, informal carers and health, social care and education personnel. Mutual recovery is therefore a very useful term because it instigates a more fully social understanding of mental health recovery processes, encompassing diverse actors in the field of mental health. Research demonstrates the importance of arts for “recovery orientated mental health services”, how they provide ways of breaking down social barriers, of expressing and understanding experiences and emotions, and of helping to rebuild identities and communities. Similarly, the humanities can advance the recovery of health and well-being. The notion of mutual recovery through creative practice is more than just a set of creative activities which are believed to have benefit. The idea is also a heuristic that can be useful to professionals and family members, as well as individuals with mental health problems themselves. Mutual recovery is perhaps best seen as a relational construct, offering new opportunities to build egalitarian, appreciative and substantively connected communities – resilient communities of mutual hope, compassion and solidarity.

Complex needs survey: informing the development of a community recovery and rehabilitation team

BEKAS Stavros
2013

This study aimed to inform the development of a new, recovery-oriented rehabilitation service, identify local needs and create a pathway for appropriate referrals, accelerating the build up of case-load. 1353 secondary service users subject to Care Programme Approach under four local community teams, an assertive outreach team and an early interventions service were surveyed using a purpose-made needs assessment and case identification questionnaire. Significant unmet need for rehabilitation and recovery-oriented interventions was found. The results were used to invite referrals, create a case-load of 150 and allocate the appropriate resources for the new team. The results highlight the untapped recovery potential among users of mainstream secondary mental health services and support investment in rehabilitation at a time of resource restriction. This work also supports a similar, evidence-based approach to targeting appropriate referrals during the development and the early stages of rehabilitation services.

The user voice: older people's experiences of reablement and rehabilitation

TRAPPES-LOMAX Tessa, HAWTON Annie
2012

Effective reablement is dependent on service users' co-operation and motivation. It therefore needs to be highly responsive to their needs and views. This study offers specific user views about their experiences in different settings and at different stages of reablement, together with their ideas for how it might work better. The study describes the experiences of 42 older people in rehabilitation services in community hospitals and local authority short-term residential units followed by “usual care” services at home. It is based on semi-structured face-to-face interviews in 2002/3, from East and Mid Devon, England. Findings revealed four main themes: the complexity of rehabilitative need; the influence of the setting; the role of the staff; and the availability of reablement support back at home. The authors concluded that the findings demonstrate changing rehabilitative needs along the care pathway, with implications for commissioners and providers of reablement services.

Vocational rehabilitation in mental health services: evaluating the work of a social and therapeutic horticulture community interest company

FIELDHOUSE Jon, PARMENTER Vanessa, HORTOP Alice
2014

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on an action inquiry (AI) evaluation of the Natureways project, a time-limited collaboration between an NHS Trust Vocational Service and a voluntary sector horticulture-based community interest company (CIC). Design/methodology/approach: Natureways produced positive employment outcomes and an AI process – based on co-operative inquiry with trainees, staff, and managers – explored how these had been achieved. Findings: Natureways’ efficacy was based on features of the setting (its supportiveness, rural location, and workplace authenticity), on its embeddedness (within local care-planning pathways, the horticultural industry, and the local community), and on effective intersectoral working. The inquiry also generated actionable learning about creative leadership and adaptability in the changing landscape of service provision, about the benefits of the CIC's small scale and business ethos, about the links between trainees’ employability, social inclusion and recovery, about horticulture as a training medium, and about the role of AI in service development. Practical implications: The inquiry highlights how an intersectoral CIC can be an effective model for vocational rehabilitation. Social implications: Community-embeddeness is an asset for mental health-orientated CICs, facilitating social inclusion and recovery. Social and therapeutic horticulture settings are seen to be conducive to this. Originality/value: This case study suggests that AI methodology is not only well-suited to many practitioners’ skill sets, but its participatory ethos and focus on experiential knowledge makes it suitable for bringing a service user voice to bear on service development.

Results 311 - 320 of 334

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