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All research records related prevention examples and research

Results 351 - 360 of 488

Growing older together: the development and promotion of resident-led models of housing with care for older people: a programme of work being undertaken by the Housing LIN (Learning and Improvement Network)

HOUSING LEARNING AND IMPROVEMENT NETWORK
2015

This practice briefing outlines the work being undertaken to capture examples of practice of resident-led housing for older people, building on the 2013 report ‘Growing older together: the case for housing that is shaped and controlled by older people’. This key area of work recognises that there is a need to increase the supply of housing suitable for older people and ensure that the offer of new housing options and choices prove attractive to a new generation of older people with changing priorities and higher expectations. The work programme will comprise several elements, including: an overall report, covering a broad range of examples; liaison with community-led housing organisations, older people’s representative forums/networks and other interested parties; and a spring conference for 2016.

Powerful people: reinforcing the power of citizens and communities in health and care: report

MUIR Rick, QUILTER-PINNER Harry
2015

This report argues that giving citizens greater control over their health and care can both promote the redesign of services, so that they are developed around citizens needs and aspirations, and also save money by supporting people to manage their conditions themselves. The report begins by looking at what empowerment in health and care means and the benefits it can bring in terms of autonomy, better health outcomes, patient satisfaction, and reductions in cost. It then describes previous programmes and initiatives which aimed to give citizens and communities greater power and why these approaches have not been entirely successful. It then describes five models of care which actively empower citizens and communities and address the deficiencies of previous initiatives. The models described are: social prescribing; brokerage and integration; peer support; asset-based community development; and technology-enabled care plans, which provide people with the tools to better manage their condition themselves. The final chapter identifies five enablers of systems change to help encourage the development and wider adoption of these new models of care: finance, devolving power and integration, recruitment and training workforce, the adoption new technology, empowering citizens to have greater control of their health and care.

Co-producing approaches to the management of dementia through social prescribing

BAKER Keith, IRVING Adele
2016

A promising approach to the management of dementia is ‘social prescribing’. Social prescribing is a form of ‘co-production’ that involves linking patients with non-clinical activities, typically delivered by voluntary and community groups, in an effort to improve their sense of well-being. The success of social prescribing depends upon the ability of boundary-spanning individuals within service delivery organizations to develop referral pathways and collaborative relationships through ‘networks’. This article examines the operation of a pilot social prescribing programme in the North East of England, targeted at older people with early onset dementia and depression, at risk of social isolation. It is argued that the scheme was not sustained, in part, because the institutional logics that governed the actions of key boundary-spanning individuals militated against the collaboration necessary to support co-production.

Care Act: assessment and eligibility: strengths-based approaches

SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
2015

This guide summarises the process and the key elements to consider in relation to using a strengths-based approach. Sections provide information on what a strength-based approach is; the information practitioners need to carry out an assessment; using strength-based mapping; and key factors that make a good assessment. It also looks at how local authorities can extend the use of the strengths-based approach from assessments to meeting needs and provides a summary of core local authority duties in relation to conducting a strengths-based approach. It should be read in conjunction with the Care and Support (Assessment) Regulations 2014 and Chapter 6 of the 'Care and support statutory guidance', published by the Department of Health.

Sustainability, innovation and empowerment: a five year vision for the independent social care sector

CARE ENGLAND
2015

Sets out Care England’s vision for the next five years on how the organisation and the sector plan to deal with a number of issues facing the health and social care system. The report focuses on critical areas of the current social care landscape, including: integrated and person-centred care; falling fees and local authorities’ budgetary constraints; recruitment of nurses; recruitment, pay and training of the care workforce; raising awareness of the value of the sector; the Care Quality Commission and the need for further improvement of the regulation process; learning disabilities; and dementia. The report warns of the risk of a collapse in the system if providers and commissioners do not work together and more nurses are not recruited into the independent sector.

Micro-enterprises: small enough to care?

NEEDHAM Catherine, et al
2015

Outlines the findings of an evaluation of micro-enterprises in social care in England, which ran from 2013 to 2015. The report focuses on very small organisations, here defined as having five members of staff or fewer, which provide care and support to adults with an assessed social care need. The research design encompassed a local asset-based approach, working with co-researchers with experience of care in the three localities. Twenty seven organisations took part in the study overall, including 17 micro-providers, whose performance was compared to that of 4 small, 4 medium and 2 large providers. A total of 143 people were interviewed for the project. The study found that: micro-providers offer more personalised support than larger providers, particularly for home-based care; they deliver more valued outcomes than larger providers, in relation to helping people do more of the things they value and enjoy; they are better than larger providers at some kinds of innovation, being more flexible and able to provide support to marginalised communities; and they offer better value for money than larger providers. Factors that help micro-providers to emerge and become sustainable include: dedicated support for start-up and development, strong personal networks within a localities, and balancing good partnerships (including with local authorities) with maintaining an independent status. Inhibiting factors, on the other hand, include a reliance on self-funders and the financial fragility of the organisation. The report makes the following recommendations: commissioners should develop different approaches to enable micro-enterprises to join preferred provider lists; social care teams should promote flexible payment options for people wanting to use micro-enterprises, including direct payments; social workers and other care professionals need to be informed about micro-enterprises operating close-by so that they can refer people to them; regulators need to ensure that their processes are proportional and accessible for very small organisations; and micro-enterprises need access to dedicated start-up support, with care sector expertise, as well as ongoing support and peer networks.

Social care for marginalised communities: balancing self-organisation, micro-provision and mainstream support

CARR Sarah
2014

This briefing reviews recent research on social care support provision for certain people with protected characteristics under the Equality Act 2010, who are often seldom heard in mainstream services. It draws out messages for social care micro-providers and social care commissioners, focusing on two areas: the marginalising dynamics in mainstream, statutory social care support provision for certain people with protected characteristics; and how local community, specialist or small-scale services are responding to unmet need for support and advice among marginalised groups. The majority of research identified looked at issues and experiences of black and minority ethnic (BME) communities, with a large number of studies dedicated to understanding the role of family carers, particularly from South Asian backgrounds. A smaller body of work on lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) older people and carers was found. Similarly, a number of research studies on support for and by refugees and asylum seekers were identified. Some research on the role of faith was also found. By comparing research findings across several groups, common issues about engagement with mainstream services and the function of community based and specialist support became apparent. The main themes and messages coming from the research for commissioners and providers focus on: strategies for responding to marginalisation from the mainstream, including assets and community mobilisation, reciprocity and social inclusion, informal networks and self-organisation; accessing and engaging with mainstream provision, highlighting issues of fear of discrimination, uniformity and homogenisation, language and communication; relationship dynamics between large, traditional mainstream and small, specialist community, including capacity building and partnerships, advocacy and accessing mainstream support, choice and voice; understanding informal support in diverse communities, in which a key role is played by culture, stigma and shame, well-being, identity and resilience, and faith; and effective approaches, including emotional and social support, and non-conventional, networked and holistic support.

Supporting influence on health and wellbeing boards: report from survey 2015

REGIONAL VOICES
2015

This report lays out the results from a survey for the voluntary and community sector (VCS), between December 2014 and January 2015, about how it is engaging with health and wellbeing boards. 119 people responded sharing their experiences from across England. While some good practice for how boards involve the VCS is emerging, some challenges remain. VCS appears to be under-utilised by local partners in health and care. Although there is considerable desire in the VCS to work with HWBs, only 22 per cent of respondents reported being able to link in with local Healthwatch or a sub-group of the HWB and around 30 per cent were able to raise issues with a VCS representative and only 9 per cent of respondents felt their organisation was linked with the work of the HWB (a reduction since the last survey). There is strong awareness that resources for local engagement are limited - with reduced capacity of local authority officers, commissioners (health and LA), the VCS and Healthwatch to work together. VCS organisations ask for clearer routes of engagement; timely involvement; and for information about developments to be shared from the board.

Fit for frailty: part 2: developing, commissioning and managing services for people living with frailty in community settings

BRITISH GERIATRICS SOCIETY, ROYAL COLLEGE OF GENERAL PRACTITIONERS
2015

Provides advice and guidance on the development, commissioning and management of services for people living with frailty in community settings. The first section introduces the concept of frailty and sets out the rationale for developing frailty services. The second section explores the essential characteristics of a good service. The third section considers the issue of performance and outcome measures for frailty services. The appendix to the report includes eight case studies of services which are operating in different parts of the UK. The audience for this guidance comprises GPs, geriatricians, health service managers, social service managers and commissioners of services. It is a companion report to an earlier BGS publication, Fit for Frailty Part 1 which provided advice and guidance on the care of older people living with frailty in community and outpatient settings.

Fit for frailty: consensus best practice guidance for the care of older people living with frailty in community and outpatient settings

TURNER Gillian
2014

The first of a two-part guidance on the recognition and management of older patients with frailty in community and outpatient settings. This guide has been produced in association with the Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP) and Age UK and aims to be an invaluable tool for social workers, ambulance crews, carers, GPs, nurses and others working with older people in the community. The guidance will help them to recognise the condition of frailty and to increase understanding of the strategies available for managing it. In the guidelines, the British Geriatrics Society (BGS) calls for all those working with older people to be aware of, and assess for frailty. It dispels the myth that all older people are frail and that frailty is an inevitable part of age. It also highlights the fact that frailty is not static. Like other long term conditions it can fluctuate in severity.

Results 351 - 360 of 488

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