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All research records related prevention examples and research

Results 371 - 380 of 421

Investing in recovery: making the business case for effective interventions for people with schizophrenia and psychosis

KNAPP Martin, et al
2014

This study provides economic evidence to support the case for investing in effective, recovery-focused services for people with schizophrenia and psychosis. Drawing on a wide range of data, it sets out the evidence for the cost-effectiveness for a range of interventions and service. Those discussed are: Early Detection (ED) services; Early Intervention (EI) teams; Individual Placement and Support (IPS); Family therapy; Criminal justice liaison and diversion; Physical health promotion, including health behaviours; Supported housing; Crisis Resolution and Home Treatment (CRHT) teams; Crisis houses; Peer support; Self-management; Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT); Anti-stigma and discrimination campaigns; Personal Budgets (PBs); and Welfare advice. For each intervention the report provides information on the context, the nature of the intervention, the evidence on effectiveness and cost-effectiveness, and the policy and practice implications. The report finds evidence to suggest that all of the interventions contribute to recovery outcomes, reduced costs and/or better value for money. Examples of the savings incurred through particular interventions are also included. The study was undertaken by a team from the Personal Social Services Research Unit (PSSRU), at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), the Centre for Mental Health, and the Centre for the Economics of Mental and Physical Health (CEMPH) at King’s College London.

Guidance for commissioners of community specialist mental health services

JOINT COMMISSIONING PANEL FOR MENTAL HEALTH
2013

The Joint Commissioning Panel for Mental Health (JCP-MH) is a new collaboration co-chaired by the Royal College of General Practitioners and the Royal College of Psychiatrists, which brings together leading organisations and individuals with an interest in commissioning for mental health and learning disabilities. This guide is about the commissioning of specialist community mental health services. It explores the role of Community Mental Health Teams (CMHTs), Assertive Outreach Teams and Early Intervention Teams among others. It has been written by a group of specialist community mental health care experts in consultation with patients and carers. Much is evidence-based, but ideas that are felt to be best practice by expert consensus are included.

Evaluating integrated and community-based care: how do we know it works?

BARDSLEY Martin, et al
2013

Over the last five years the Nuffield Trust has undertaken evaluations of over 30 different community-based interventions. In many cases the authors have been tasked with identifying whether service changes have led to a reduction in emergency admissions and the associated cost to the NHS. Using these indicators, the results have been almost overwhelmingly negative. The one exception was Marie Curie Nursing Services for terminally ill patients. In this paper the authors outline the main community-based interventions they have evaluated and their impact, and identify nine points that may help those designing, implementing and evaluating such interventions in future. The paper could provide useful learning for the new health and social care integration ‘pioneer’ sites that will be appointed by the Department of Health by September 2013.

Predictive validity of tools used to assess the risk of unplanned admissions: a rapid review of the evidence

PATON Fiona, WILSON Paul, WRIGHT Kath
2014

A synthesis of evidence assessing the predictive ability of tools used to identify frail elderly and people living with multiple long-term chronic health conditions who are at risk of future unplanned hospital admissions. There are now a large number of models available that can be used to predict the risk of unplanned hospital admissions and this study aims to provide a summary of their comparative performance. Overall, the models identified in this review show reasonable concordance in terms of their predictive performance (based on c-statistics). Models reporting other performance indications showed that at different thresholds, as sensitivity increased, specificity would decrease. As the algorithms become more complex or incorporate longer term horizons specificity increased but the ability of the models to identify future high cost individuals reduced. It should also be noted that whilst the reported c-statistics are broadly similar, the underlying populations, data sources and coding may differ.

The effectiveness of local authority social services' occupational therapy for older people in Great Britain: a critical literature review

BONIFACE Gail, et al
2013

This literature review systematically selected, critically appraised, and thematically synthesized the post 2000 published and unpublished evidence on the effectiveness and cost effectiveness of occupational therapy interventions for older people in social care services. Identified themes established: the localized nature of social care services for older people; organizational and policy impacts on services, and factors influencing effectiveness and cost effectiveness. Although occupational therapists are increasingly involved in rehabilitation and reablement, there is a continuing focus on equipment and adaptations provision. A high level of service user satisfaction was identified, once timely occupational therapy services were received. Overall, occupational therapy in social care is perceived as effective in improving quality of life for older people and their carers, and cost effective in making savings for other social and healthcare services. However, the complex nature of social care services makes it difficult to disaggregate the effectiveness of occupational therapy from other services.

Technical guide: building a business case for prevention

SOCIAL FINANCE
2014

This guide sets out the issues that need to be considered when developing a business case to invest in preventive services and to ensure that any decision are based on robust and reliable data. The guide focuses on the following arguments: the importance of 'investing to save', arguing that prevention is cheaper in the long term; promotion of service innovation; placing the focus of commissioning on outcomes rather than outputs; and managing a shift in spending from acute to prevention to reduce demand over time. The guide outlines key four activities required to build a business case: understanding needs; understanding current costs; assessing possible interventions; and deciding how to measure the value and outcome of the interventions. It also provides a summary business case for prevention and using a Social Impact Bond (SBI) to finance a business case for prevention. An example case study of making a business case for prevention services in early years services in Greater Manchester is included.

Promising returns: a commissioners guide to investing in mentoring and befriending programmes

MENTORING AND BEFRIENDING FOUNDATION
2012

This guide aims to give an overview of the range, diversity and positive impact of mentoring and befriending activity. Using case studies and programme examples, it outlines a range of mentoring and befriending approaches and identifies the key potential outcomes, including reduced offending, improved community cohesion, improved access to employment, reduced social isolation, higher aspirations and increased independence. The document also explains how the Mentoring and Befriending Foundation can support commissioners identify effective programmes.

‘The Billion Dollar Question’: embedding prevention in older people's services—Ten ‘High-Impact’ changes

ALLEN Kerry, GLASBY Jon
2013

With ageing populations, social changes and rising public expectations, many countries are exploring ways of developing a more preventative approach within their health and social care services. In England, this has become a growing priority over time—made even more significant by recent economic change and by the urgent need to reduce public sector spending. However, a key dilemma for policy makers and managers is the patchy nature of the evidence base—with a lack of certainty over how to reform services or prioritise spending in order to develop a more genuinely preventative approach. Against this background, this commentary reviews national and international evidence around ten policy measures and interventions, highlighting some of the most promising approaches as well as the fragmented and contested nature of the evidence base.

Beginning with the end in mind: how outcomes-based commissioning can help unlock the potential of community services

NHS CONFEDERATION. Community Health Services Forum
2014

Explains outcomes-based commissioning and outlines how it might help enable service transformation. Outcomes-based commissioning incentivises high-value interventions, shifting resources to services in the community, a focus on keeping people healthy and in their own homes, delivering outcomes that matter to people using the services, and coordinated care. It discusses the opportunities that outcomes-based commissioning gives for providers of community services, including the main technical considerations that will need to be addressed. Health outcomes have become the standard for measuring successful care. More and more people are living with long-term, and often multiple, conditions. This briefing argues that successful care for this group of people is not about providing a cure or a certain number of procedures, but about enabling and supporting them to live as well as possible with their conditions over the long term. Achieving this will involve transforming the system so that all of its parts work in an integrated way towards the outcomes people want and need most. Unlocking the unmet potential in community settings is crucial in both transforming care and improving efficiency. The briefing includes practical examples showcasing how community providers are using innovative ways of supporting and enabling people with high levels of clinical need to be cared for at home or more locally, and are working in partnership with other health and care providers. It will be of interest to all commissioners and providers considering developing an outcomes-based commissioning approach that includes community health services. It is particularly relevant to providers of community services.

Funny things happen at the Grange: introducing comedy activities in day services to older people with dementia: innovative practice

HAFFORD-LETCHFIELD Trish
2013

This paper shares outcomes from the evaluation of a community project where comedy activities were introduced into a day centre for older people with dementia as a result of a partnership between the day centre, a local university and a specialist comedy provider. Four workshops were provided using improvisatory activities and comedy, as a medium to engage older people in reflecting on aspects of their care environment. The main output resulted in a 30 minute ‘mockumentary’ of the ‘Her Majesty the Queen’ visiting the day centre, in the form of a digital reusable learning object to be used by social work and mental health professionals. The evaluation demonstrated some additional outcomes for those involved and highlighted the benefits of laughter and fun in promoting a positive climate.

Results 371 - 380 of 421

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My Guide: new case example

My Guide: new case example My Guide is a sighted guiding service, started by The Guide Dogs for the Blind Association (Guide Dogs), in which trained volunteers assist blind and partially sighted adults to get out and about, thus helping to prevent social isolation.
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