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Results for 'Care Act 2014'

Results 1 - 10 of 12

Implementing the Care Act 2014:building social resources to prevent, reduce or delay needs for care and support in adult social care in England

TEWA Jerry, et al
2019

This Report is based on research into ‘second wave’ approaches to prevention and capacity building that have become more prominent since the implementation of the Care Act 2014. These approaches involve a fundamental revisioning of the role of local services and seek to maximise resources and opportunities through working in more co-productive ways with citizens, families and communities. The findings are based on a national survey of local authorities and in-depth case study research with stakeholders, beneficiaries and family members in seven local authorities which were promoting one or more ‘second wave’ preventative initiatives. A key findings was that a preventative focus is still relatively new in adult social care and that approaches are often embedded within a variety of strategic initiatives, including: strengths-based models of social work and social care practice (such as 3 Conversations); approaches to social networking and building community capacity (such as Local Area Coordination); mobilising the resources of family and personal networks (through approaches such as Family Group Conferencing, peer support or Community Circles) and targeted ‘upstream’ use of personal budgets. Another finding was that overall, financial pressures were seen as the most important driver towards developing preventative activity, but, at the same time, this was also cited most frequently as the greatest barrier. Other frequently cited barriers to progressing the prevention agenda were competing policy imperatives and, in particular, perceived pressure to make rushed decisions in order to minimise delays in hospital discharge. The report also examines wellbeing outcomes and expenditure. The report makes recommendations for the policy, practice and implementation and evaluation contexts. The reports concludes that there is some strong evidence of the creativity and innovation that is taking place in a significant proportion of local authorities. While progress may not be consistent across the sector, the research shows that a sizable proportion of local authorities have been investing in activity that is designed to increase capacity and capability at individual, family and community levels, and thereby to contribute to preventing, reducing or delaying the need for adult social care services.

Evaluating social care prevention in England: challenges and opportunities

MARCZAK Joanna, WISTOW Gerald, FERNANDEZ Jose-Luis
2019

Context: The Care Act 2014 placed a statutory duty on adult social care (ASC) to prevent and delay the development of needs for care and support. There is little clarity about how to translate this national obligation into effective local practice. Objectives: This exploratory study sought to lay the foundations for understanding approaches to this new duty by identifying: emerging local understandings of prevention; associated implementation strate­gies; and the potential for designing evaluation frameworks. Methods: Local perspectives were secured through: in-depth interviews in six English local authorities; reviews of local strategy, implementation documents and reviews of data sources; and methods for evaluating local initiatives in sampled authorities. Findings: The findings indicate important differences between and within local authorities in conceptuali­sations of prevention. Although willingness to commission services was strongly linked to the availability of evidence on what works in prevention, council conducted limited local evaluations. This study also found limited collaboration between ASC and Health in developing joint prevention approaches, in part due to differ­ences in conceptualisation and also constraints arising from different priorities and information systems. Limitations: The exploratory nature of the study and the small sample size limits the generalisability of its findings. Overall, the number of local authorities and respondents allowed us to explore a range of local views, opinions and practices related to the prevention agenda in a variety of contexts, however the findings are not generalisable to all English local authorities. Implications: This study suggests that the limited local evidence about prevention, combined with finan­cial austerity, may lead to disproportionate investment in a small number of interventions where existing evidence suggests cost-savings potential, which, in turn, may impact authorities’ ability to fulfil their statutory duties related to preventing and delaying the needs for care and support. In this connection, this study highlights the potential for developing local evaluation strategies utilising existing but largely unexploited local administrative data collections.

Prevention in action: how prevention and integration are being understood and prioritised locally in England

FIELD Olivia
2017

This report provides a picture of local developments in preventative services in England and highlights examples of good practice. It aimed to explore the extent to which local authorities, sustainability and transformation partnerships, and health and wellbeing boards across England recognise and prioritise the Care Act’s understanding of prevention, as well as to better understand how and to what extent local decision makers are integrating health and social care. The methodology included a review of joint health and wellbeing strategies and sustainability and transformation plans, and a Freedom of Information (FOI) request to local authorities. The report finds that while local authorities across England have made efforts to implement preventative services and identifies examples of innovation and good practice, the Care Act’s vision for prevention is not being fully realised and that local authorities in England need to provide more services that prevent, reduce or delay the need for care and support. The report also identified shortcomings in plans for integrating health and social care. Barriers to implementing preventive services include: a lack of clarity on what is meant by prevention and integration, resistance to cultural change, and reduced resources. The report makes recommendations to support a better and integrated, preventative care system.

'Three Conversation Model' Transforming Lives Cambridgeshire County Council Adults Learning Disabilities Team

Cambridgeshire County Council

East Cambridgeshire Learning Disability Partnership is a multi disciplinary team providing social care and specialist health input to adults with learning disabilities living in the community. In 2014, Cambridgeshire County Council started its Transforming Lives programme to meet new requirements arising from the Care Act, and as part of this programme the East Cambridgeshire Learning Disability Partnership team began to pilot the Three Conversation Model (pioneered by Partners for Change) in October of that year. The model is now well established in the team and has been rolled out across the council.

Volunteering and social action and the Care Act: an opportunity for local government

VOLUNTEERING MATTERS
2016

This paper provides advice and guidance for councillors and chief officers to help them respond to the Care Act 2014 by working together with partners in their local communities to develop volunteering and social action. The paper identifies Care Act duties placed on local government and partner organisation, which are to promote wellbeing; prevent reduce or delay needs by building on the resources of the local community; the provision of information and advice; and shaping a diverse and sustainable local market of providers for care and support. It then highlights the role volunteering can play in helping to fulfil these duties; why the VCSE sector is a useful partner for local authorities seeking to deliver their Care Act responsibilities; and identifies Care Act duties where volunteers can make a contribution. It also identifies shared features of initiatives which are effective building community capacity and promoting voluntary action. These are that they are co-produced, respond to local context, human in scale, strength-based; build in learning; build in sustainability; and adaptive, able to learn from their experience. It concludes with the challenges that need to be addressed to make the most of community capacity and build services which are ‘prevention-focused’. These are to provide community leadership and strategic direction; replicate and scale up good practice; prioritisation versus competing demands; commissioning practice; facilitate choice and control through micro-commissioning; supplement not displace paid work; and measure the impact of volunteering. Includes links to additional resources and sources of information.

Prevention in action: the extent to which English local authorities and health and wellbeing boards recognise and prioritise prevention, as defined within the Care Act (2014)

FIELD Olivia, CARTER Chloe
2016

Explores the extent to which local authorities and health and wellbeing boards across England recognise and prioritise the Care Act’s understanding of prevention. The study reviewed joint health and wellbeing strategies for the third year in a row, and made a Freedom of Information (FOI) request of all English local authorities to examine whether, and in which context, prevention was mentioned in the HWBs relevant documentation and how local authorities were implementing Section 2 of the Care Act. The Freedom of Information (FOI) responses indicate that local authorities are engaging with the Care Act’s triple definition of prevention, but this terminology has yet to be embraced by health and wellbeing boards. Both the FOI responses and joint health and wellbeing strategy review indicate that prevention is a key consideration in local decision making, including commissioning. However, while the review of joint health and wellbeing strategies indicates an improved understanding of prevention, tertiary types of prevention are still not being emphasised as much as primary and secondary prevention. In some cases, they are forgotten altogether. Many health and wellbeing boards are yet to place importance on preventative measures that could stop the deterioration or reoccurrence of a health or social care-related crisis by providing lower-level support. FOI responses and joint health and wellbeing strategies also emphasise the practical difficulties of shifting resources away from crisis intervention to prevention, especially in the current economic climate.

The role of housing in adult safeguarding

CASS Elaine
2015

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to highlight the role of housing in adult safeguarding under the Care Act (2014) in England. Design/methodology/approach: The paper provides a summary of the implications for housing organisations and their staff of adult safeguarding under the Care Act. The implications, underpinned by the six safeguarding principles, are explained within a summary of the legal and practice framework for safeguarding in England. Findings: The paper draws upon research by Imogen Parry (2014). It argues that past failings in adult safeguarding in England have placed it high on the housing agenda and that housing has a key role to play in adult safeguarding. Practical implications: Housing organisations need to be proactive partners in local multi-agency arrangements for adult safeguarding. Staff and contractors need to receive training in line with their role to raise awareness of their safeguarding responsibilities. Originality/value: The value of the paper is to increase and maintain awareness of the need for housing engagement in the adult safeguarding agenda.

Response to the regulations and guidance of the Care Act 2014: section 2: prevention, reducing or delaying needs

CARE AND SUPPORT ALLIANCE
2015

Sets out the response of the Care and Support Alliance to the Government consultation on draft regulations and guidance of the Care Act 2014. The response focuses on section 2 which covers prevention, reducing or delaying needs. Overall, the Alliance is pleased with the draft of both the regulations and guidance, but notes areas that could be strengthened and identifies scope to improve the read across to other chapters. Areas covered in the response include the description of prevention used and the examples of preventative services and resources listed in the guidance.

Assessing social care market and provider sustainability: project report

CORDIS BRIGHT
2015

Summarises the methods and approach, discusses the learning and shares knowledge arising from the ‘Assessing social care market and provider sustainability’ project, which has developed guidance and a toolkit for the Department of Health, the Local Government Association, and the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services. These resources are designed to support implementation of the Care Act 2014 and help local authorities fulfil their responsibilities in the event of a care provider failure.

Care Act guidance on Strengths-based approaches

SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
2015

This guide summarises the process and the key elements to consider in relation to using a strengths-based approach. Sections provide information on what a strength-based approach is; the information practitioners need to carry out an assessment; using strength-based mapping; and key factors that make a good assessment. It also looks at how local authorities can extend the use of the strengths-based approach from assessments to meeting needs and provides a summary of core local authority duties in relation to conducting a strengths-based approach. It should be read in conjunction with the Care and Support (Assessment) Regulations 2014 and Chapter 6 of the 'Care and support statutory guidance', published by the Department of Health.

Results 1 - 10 of 12

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