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Results for 'NHS'

Results 1 - 10 of 15

The older adults’ NHS and social care return on investment tool: final report

PUBLIC HEALTH ENGLAND
2020

This report summarises the evidence on nine identified interventions to support older people. It is the final report of a project to provide a return on investment (ROI) tool to help stakeholders and decision-makers to compare the cost-effectiveness of interventions to reduce the need for services in older adults. The focus is on the use of social care services, but the report also reviews interventions which also reduced the need for health services. The ROI includes nine interventions, identified though a literature review. They are: community singing; a help at home scheme; a befriending service; the WHELD intervention for people living with dementia in nursing home; the INTERCOM intervention providing hospital discharge support for COPD patients; voluntary and community sector (VCS) services aimed at patients with long-term conditions, which use social prescribing and other approaches to put patients in touch with services; health coaching; the BELLA intervention providing self-management support for COPD patients; and a home care reablement service. An accompanying technical report provides further detail of the literature review, selection of the interventions for inclusion in the tool and the modelling methods. The return investment tool is available to download. It can be adapted to local conditions and presents results showing the economic benefits of each intervention.

The impact of telehealth on use of hospital care and mortality: research summary

STEVENTON Adam, BARDSLEY Martin
2012

The impact of telehealth on hospital use, patient admission and mortality were evaluated in three trial sites in England. The sites were from the Department of Health’s Whole System Demonstrator pilots. The evaluation focused on the use of telehealth to people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes or heart failure. It used a large randomised controlled trial which included over 3,000 participants (1,584 control and 1,570 intervention) in which groups of patients either received the telehealth intervention or acted as controls by receiving their usual care. Statistically significant differences in rates of emergency hospital admission and mortality were found during the twelve months of the trial between control and intervention groups. For intervention patients, the overall costs of hospital care (including emergency admissions, elective admissions and outpatient attendances) were £188 per patient less than those for controls. However, this cost difference was not statistically significant. As well as summarising the main findings the research summary highlights the limitations of the research and other issues that need to be considered in relation to the findings.

The older adults’ NHS and social care return on investment tool: technical report

PUBLIC HEALTH ENGLAND
2020

The technical report of a project which aimed to provide a return on investment (ROI) tool to help stakeholders and decision-makers to compare the cost-effectiveness of interventions to reduce the need for services in older adults. This report provides detail of the literature review process, the process of assessment and prioritisation of interventions for inclusion in the tool, and the detailed modelling methods used. Based on evidence from the literature review and through discussion with expert Steering Group members, nine interventions are included in the ROI tool. These are: community singing; a help at home scheme; a befriending service; the WHELD intervention for people living with dementia in nursing home; the INTERCOM intervention providing hospital discharge support for COPD patients; voluntary and community sector (VCS) services aimed at patients with long-term conditions, using social prescribing and other approaches to put patients in touch with services; health coaching delivered by inter-professional health and social care services; the BELLA intervention providing self-management support for COPD patients; and a home care reablement service. The return investment tool is available to download. It can be adapted to local conditions and shows the economic benefits of each intervention.

Care and Health Improvement programme: efficiency project

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2018

This report provides practice examples from ten councils who took part in the Care and Health Improvement Programme during 2016/17. It describes the innovative approaches they took to achieve greater efficiencies from their adult social care budgets and draws conclusions as to what other councils might learn from them. The examples cover three main areas: managing demand for social care by offering residents a different type of service; more effectively using the capacity in communities to help find new care solutions; and working closer with partners in the NHS to reduce pressures in the care and health system. They highlight the importance of councils dealing with people effectively at their first point of contact; the benefits of using strength-based approaches; that developing social enterprises can be a cost effective way of meeting demand and reducing shortage of supply; and the potential of collaboration between councils to reduce costs and demand for services. The 10 councils are: Bristol City Council, Poole Borough Council, Swindon and Wiltshire Councils; Norfolk County Council; Waltham Forest Council; Somerset Council; Newcastle City Council; Nottingham City Council; and Nottinghamshire County Council.

The Rotherham Social Prescribing Service for People with long-term conditions: evaluation update

DAYSON Chris, DAMM Chris
2017

An updated assessment of the social and economic impact of the Rotherham Social Prescribing Service between September 2012 and March 2016. Originally commissioned as a two-year pilot in 2012 the service is now funded until 2018 through the Better Care Fund. Its two core features are: advisors providing a single gateway to voluntary and community sector (VCS) support for GPs and service users (advisors assess the support needs of patients and carers before referring on to appropriate VCS services) and a grant funding programme for VCS activities to meet the needs of service users. The evaluation reports that between September 2012 and March 2016 the Rotherham Social Prescribing Service supported more than 3,000 local people with long-term health conditions and their carers. It identifies reductions in service users’ use of secondary care, reduced admissions to Accident and Emergency, and improvements in the well-being of service users. Wider benefits seen in the VCS across Rotherham, include additional investment; developing and promoting social action and volunteering; and the development of a ‘micro-commissioning’ model. The evaluation also consistently demonstrated costs avoided by the NHS, with figures across the first four years of service equating to an estimated £647,000 of NHS costs avoided: an initial return on investment of 35 pence for each pound (£1) invested.

The social value of sheltered housing: briefing paper

WOOD Claudia
2017

Drawing on the findings from a review of evidence on the impact of sheltered housing for older people, this briefing paper provides estimates of the cost savings sheltered housing can achieve for health and social care. The paper gives a conservative estimate of a social value saving made by sheltered housing of nearly half a billion pounds. This figure takes into account costs saved through a reduction in the number of falls by older people, the time spent in hospital, combating loneliness, as well as fewer unnecessary call-outs to emergency services. The paper was commissioned to help Anchor, Hanover and Housing & Care 21 consider the future of sheltered housing.

Implementing the Five Year Forward View for Mental Health

NHS ENGLAND
2016

Implementation plan which outlines a roadmap for delivering the commitments made in the Five Year Forward View for Mental Health to people who use services and the public in order to improve care. It prioritises objectives for delivery by 2020/21 and is intended as a blueprint for the changes that NHS staff, other organisations and other parts of the system can make. Key principles of the plan include co-production, working in partnership with local public, private and voluntary sector organisations; early interventions and delivering person-centred care. The plan also gives a clear indication to the public and people who use services what they can expect from the NHS, and when. It also outlines future funding commitments, shows how the workforce requirements will be delivered in these priority areas, and how data and payment will support transparency. Separate sections cover: children and young people’s mental health; perinatal mental health; adult mental health – including community, acute, crisis care and secure care; mental health and justice, and suicide prevention. These individual chapters set out national-level objectives, costs and planning assumptions. Chapters also describe cross-cutting work to help sustain transformation, including testing new models of care and ensuring the health and wellbeing of the NHS workforce.

Public health's role in local government and NHS integration

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2016

Drawing on information from six case studies, this report makes the case for greater engagement of public health in supporting integration across local government and the NHS. It identifies two reasons for public health to be involved in integration: the skills, capacity and expertise public health teams can bring, and the potential of integration for improving health and wellbeing. The report explores four areas in which public health involvement in integration has been found to make the greatest impact: collaborative systems leadership, a population approach, a focus on prevention and developing outcomes. A short self-assessment tool is also included which can be used for areas to consider the extent of public health involvement in integration in their own area. The case studies come from Doncaster, Hertfordshire, London Borough of Richmond, Somerset, Wakefield and Worcestershire.

At the heart of health: realising the value of people and communities

WOOD Suzanne, et al
2016

This report explores the value of people and communities at the heart of health, in support of the NHS Five Year Forward View vision to develop a new relationship with people and communities. It seeks to bring together in one place a wide range of person- and community-centred approaches for health and wellbeing. It provides an overview of the existing evidence base with a particular focus on the potential benefits of adopting these approaches. The report suggests that there is evidence from research and practice to demonstrate the benefits of person- and community-centred approaches, across three dimensions of value: mental and physical health and wellbeing – these approaches have been shown to increase people’s self-efficacy and confidence to manage their health and care, improve health outcomes and experience, to reduce social isolation and loneliness, and build community capacity and resilience, among other outcomes; NHS sustainability – these approaches can impact how people use health and care services and can lead to reduced demand on services, particularly emergency admissions and A&E visits; and wider social outcomes: these approaches can lead to a wide range of social outcomes, from improving employment prospects and school attendance to increasing volunteering. They also can potentially contribute to reducing health inequalities for individuals and communities. The report includes an outline of the ‘Realising the Value’ programme, which is designed to develop the field of person- and community-centred approaches for health and wellbeing by building the evidence base and developing tools, resources and networks to support the spread and increase the impact of key approaches.

Making the case for public health interventions: public health spending and return on investment

KING'S FUND, LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2014

These infographics from the King's Fund and the Local Government Association set out key facts about the public health system and the return on investment for some public health interventions. They show the changing demographics with a growing ageing population and the impact of social and behavioural determinants on people’s health. The document also highlights the costs of key health and social services and estimates the potential returns on investment on preventative interventions. For instance, Birmingham’s Be Active programme of free use of leisure centres and other initiatives returned an estimated £23 in quality of life, reduced NHS use and other gains for every £1 spent. Every £1 spent on improving homes saves the NHS £70 over 10 years. Befriending services have been estimated to pay back around £3.75 in reduced mental health service spending and improvements in health for every £1 spent. Every £1 spent on drugs treatment saves society £2.50 in reduced NHS and social care costs and reduced crime.

Results 1 - 10 of 15

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
View more: News
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