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Results for 'access to services'

Results 1 - 10 of 20

Designing digital skills interventions for older people

PIERCY Laurence
2019

The internet and digital technologies can play a valuable role in supporting older and disabled people to improve health and wellbeing and gain easier access to health and care services. This report brings together recommendations for designing digital skills interventions for older people with care and support needs. It draws on insights from pathfinders in Sunderland and Thanet, which were funded by NHS Digital and supported by Good Things Foundation as part of the Widening Digital Participation programme. The pathfinders generated insights on small system-level changes that can embed digital inclusion in social care support and factors influencing digital inclusion within social housing schemes. The pilots also highlight the importance of engaging people at the right time when they can find relevance and value in technology. A list of useful resources are also included.

Review of the impact of loneliness and social isolation on health and well-being and whether people who experience loneliness/social isolation have higher use of public services

WEAKLAND John H, OWENS Janine, SIROIS Fuschia M.
2019

This research, carried out by the University of Sheffield and OB3 Research, explores whether loneliness and social isolation result in increased use of public and health services. It also looks at the types of contexts that led to increased or decreased service use as a result of loneliness and social isolation. The research involved a scoping review of the literature, a meta-analysis of nine papers and a consultation with 10 key organisations representing a range of groups in Wales. The consultation identified issues for a number of groups, including children, older people, refugees and asylum seekers, LGBTQ people, single parents, and carers. The findings suggest that loneliness and social isolation do play a part in increased use of services, but that loneliness and social isolation alone do not create the conditions for increased service use. Perceptions of loneliness and social isolation for the service users can also be intensified by inconsistency in accessing services, particularly for those who are from already stigmatised groups. The report discusses key themes and their relationship with loneliness, social isolation, access to services and service use. Including: stigma and service use; service related barriers; bullying and victimisation; disabilities; housing, poverty, and changes to service delivery. It makes 16 recommendations for the Welsh Government, which include: for research into loneliness and social isolation, and the recruitment of more peer support workers into the voluntary and public sector to support different groups of people.

The 'front door' to adult social care

AUDITOR GENERAL FOR WALES
2019

To meet the aims of the Social Services and Well-being (Wales) Act 2014, local authorities need to have created a comprehensive ‘front door’ to social care and to have in places an effective Information, Advice and Assistance (IAA) service. This audit report considers the effectiveness of IAA services in Wales, the availability of preventative and community-based support, and the systems put in place to ensure those who need care and support or are at risk are identified and helped. It also considers the impact of the front door on demand for social care and in respect of improving wellbeing. Although local authorities are supporting people to access a wider range of support options, there is a lack of comprehensive understanding of what is available and the preventative services that are needed. It also found that carers are still not getting equal access to the services they need. Based on the findings, the report concludes that councils are preventing social-care demand, but there is variation in the availability, accessibility and quality of information, advice and assistance services. It makes recommendations to help improve access to information, advice and assistance services.

Raising the bar on strength and balance: the importance of community-based provision

CENTRE FOR AGEING BETTER
2019

This report draws on work from the University of Manchester Healthy Ageing Research Group, which worked with communities to better understand the challenges of delivering strength and balance programmes for older adults in the local community. These activities could include resistance training, aerobics classes and yoga groups. The report argues that NHS falls rehabilitation services often don’t have the funding or ability to provide sufficient strength and balance programmes to meet existing needs, which means an effective community-based response is essential. The report presents different models of delivery of community-based activities, barriers to delivery and examples of innovative solutions identified during the project. The findings cover five themes: raising awareness, encouraging uptake, exercise referral pathways that work, sticking to the evidence, and monitoring for outcomes and improvements. Each theme highlights five key points to ensure that strength and balance exercise programmes are delivered to the right people, at the right time, and by the right people, so that older adults achieve positive results. Recommendations for commissioners, providers and health care professionals are also included. These include for NHS and local authorities support evidence-based programmes and for improved collaboration between those referring people to programmes and those delivering them.

'What would life be: without a song or a dance, what are we?' A report from the Commission on Dementia and Music

BOWELL Sally, BAMFORD Sally-Marie
2018

This report examines the current landscape of using therapeutic music with people with dementia, outlines the value and benefits of music therapy, and looks at what needs to be done to ensure that everyone with dementia is able to access music. Informed by the Commission on Dementia and Music, the report brings together a wide range of evidence, including academic papers, written and oral evidence, and evidence from site visits. The evidence shows that music can help to minimise symptoms of dementia, such as agitation and can help tackle anxiety and depression. Evidence also shows that music can help improves the quality of life for people with dementia by increasing social interaction and decreasing stress. The report also shows that although the dementia and music environment is supported by a dedicated network of individuals and organisations, they work in a complex and poorly coordinate system. The field is also defined by sporadic access, with only relatively few people with dementia having access. It concludes that the sector would benefit from increased funding, further cost-effective research to boost recognition and funding, and increased public awareness about the benefits of music. The report includes recommendations to help improve access to music for people with dementia.

Disabled Facilities Grant (DFG) and other adaptations: external review

MACKINTOSH Shelia, et al
2018

This review, commissioned by the Department of Health and Social Care, looks at how the Disabled Facilities Grant (DFG) currently operates and makes evidence based recommendations for how it should change in the future. It review aims to develop more effective ways of supporting more people to live in suitable housing so they can stay independent for longer and makes the case for more joint working across housing, health and social care. The focus of the review is on how the disabled or older person can be put at the centre of service provision and what would make it easier for them to access services. It also looks at the role of DFG in prevention and how it can deliver this more effectively. It draws on a range of evidence, including: analysis of data from LOGASnet returns; consultation events attended by local authorities and home improvement agencies; interviews with staff from selected local authorities; and a short review of the academic, policy and practice literature. The conclusions and recommendations include: renaming the grant to reflect that it is part of a broader set interventions to help people remain independent; improved integration of services; better partnership working between health and care and different professions; raising the upper limit of the grant; and changes to the current formula for allocating funding; and updating of the existing means testing regulations. The review also identifies additional research to be carried out.

Creative and cultural activities and wellbeing in later life

ARCHER Libby, et al
2018

This report explores the benefits of participating in creative and cultural activities for wellbeing in later life. It discusses what creative and cultural participation means and the types of activities people take part in, such as dance, craft, literary activities, music and historical activities. It also looks at the factors that can help people get involved and how levels of involvement can differ depending on people’s overall level of wellbeing. It includes examples of initiatives for older people, including Independent Arts’ participatory arts Time & Tide project and Out in the City’, a social initiative for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people over 50. It concludes with recommendations for practitioners and policymakers.

Rethinking respite for people affected by dementia

OLDER PEOPLE'S COMMISSIONER FOR WALES
2018

This report provides evidence of how respite care for people affected by dementia can be positively transformed and aims to help policy makers, commissioners and providers to deliver change. It brings together the results of an engagement exercise with over 120 people affected by dementia, undertaken in partnership with My Home Life Cymru (Swansea University); a literature review by the University of Worcester Association for Dementia Studies; and a call for examples of practice. The report identifies key challenges facing people who need to accessing respite when they need it, covering the following themes: navigating the health and care system; availability; quality, flexibility and choice; information, advice and advocacy; meaningful occupation; home or away?; complex needs and keeping people active; safeguarding and positive risk taking; diversity; maintaining and building relationships; social inclusion and having an ‘ordinary’ life. Drawing on people’s experiences and examples from practice, it provides enablers to help overcome these barriers. The report shows that not all ‘routes to respite’ are clear to the public, there is uneven access across the country, many people feel that current options are not delivering the quality, flexibility or accessibility they need; and there were concerns that money is being spent on respite services that do not deliver meaningful outcomes. It concludes that there is a need to rethink the language and terminology around respite; make better use of the knowledge and experiences of people living with dementia and carers to develop new models of care and support; and to align the outcomes with the National Outcomes Framework. Whilst the report focuses specifically on people affected by dementia, many of the key messages will be relevant to other people who need respite.

Housing adaptations

AUDITOR GENERAL FOR WALES
2018

This report assesses whether organisations with responsibilities for delivering housing adaptations in Wales - which include local authorities, housing associations and Care and Repair agencies - have an effective approach that delivers value for money. It finds that the current system needs to change in order to meet the needs of older and disabled people. The review involved fieldwork at five local authorities and four housing associations, a survey of people who had received adaptations; and an analysis of data and expenditure on current services. It reports that although users express high levels of satisfaction with housing adaptations, the system is complex, reactive and results in people with similar needs often receiving different standards of service because of where they live and who is providing the service. Although public bodies are aware of the benefits of adaptations in supporting independence, ineffective partnership working results in missed opportunities to address needs and avoid and reduce demand and costs in health and social care services. The report makes nine recommendations for improvement, including: for the Welsh Government to set a minimum standard for adaptation work, so people can receive the same standard wherever they live; for local authorities to work more closely with partner agencies who deliver adaptations and streamline the application and delivery processes; and the provision of more accessible versions of information to the public.

The obstacle course: overcoming the barriers to a better later life

CHRISTIE Amelia, McDOWELL Adrian
2017

This report looks at some of the issues older people and their families face in accessing the services and support they need to remain independent and live healthy, enjoyable lives. The report draws on an analysis of calls received to the Independent Age advice Helpline in 2016 and findings from other charities, think tanks and government reports. It focuses on four topic areas: help with serious health needs; understanding social care and the barriers to accessing support when they need personal care and practical help, securing a decent income and access to benefits; and staying in control which looks at some of the major life changes older people can experience, in relation to their finances and housing. For each topic area, the report examines the most common issues older people face and includes individual stories older people and their family members which show the difference early intervention can make, as well as where things are going wrong. It also highlights emerging issues which may get worse in the future, if not addressed. The report concludes that the country is still not responding well enough for a rapidly ageing population. It offers some recommendations to improve health, care and social security services for older people.

Results 1 - 10 of 20

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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