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Results for 'access to services'

Results 1 - 10 of 14

Creative and cultural activities and wellbeing in later life

ARCHER Libby, et al
2018

This report explores the benefits of participating in creative and cultural activities for wellbeing in later life. It discusses what creative and cultural participation means and the types of activities people take part in, such as dance, craft, literary activities, music and historical activities. It also looks at the factors that can help people get involved and how levels of involvement can differ depending on people’s overall level of wellbeing. It includes examples of initiatives for older people, including Independent Arts’ participatory arts Time & Tide project and Out in the City’, a social initiative for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people over 50. It concludes with recommendations for practitioners and policymakers.

Rethinking respite for people affected by dementia

OLDER PEOPLE'S COMMISSIONER FOR WALES
2018

This report provides evidence of how respite care for people affected by dementia can be positively transformed and aims to help policy makers, commissioners and providers to deliver change. It brings together the results of an engagement exercise with over 120 people affected by dementia, undertaken in partnership with My Home Life Cymru (Swansea University); a literature review by the University of Worcester Association for Dementia Studies; and a call for examples of practice. The report identifies key challenges facing people who need to accessing respite when they need it, covering the following themes: navigating the health and care system; availability; quality, flexibility and choice; information, advice and advocacy; meaningful occupation; home or away?; complex needs and keeping people active; safeguarding and positive risk taking; diversity; maintaining and building relationships; social inclusion and having an ‘ordinary’ life. Drawing on people’s experiences and examples from practice, it provides enablers to help overcome these barriers. The report shows that not all ‘routes to respite’ are clear to the public, there is uneven access across the country, many people feel that current options are not delivering the quality, flexibility or accessibility they need; and there were concerns that money is being spent on respite services that do not deliver meaningful outcomes. It concludes that there is a need to rethink the language and terminology around respite; make better use of the knowledge and experiences of people living with dementia and carers to develop new models of care and support; and to align the outcomes with the National Outcomes Framework. Whilst the report focuses specifically on people affected by dementia, many of the key messages will be relevant to other people who need respite.

Housing adaptations

AUDITOR GENERAL FOR WALES
2018

This report assesses whether organisations with responsibilities for delivering housing adaptations in Wales - which include local authorities, housing associations and Care and Repair agencies - have an effective approach that delivers value for money. It finds that the current system needs to change in order to meet the needs of older and disabled people. The review involved fieldwork at five local authorities and four housing associations, a survey of people who had received adaptations; and an analysis of data and expenditure on current services. It reports that although users express high levels of satisfaction with housing adaptations, the system is complex, reactive and results in people with similar needs often receiving different standards of service because of where they live and who is providing the service. Although public bodies are aware of the benefits of adaptations in supporting independence, ineffective partnership working results in missed opportunities to address needs and avoid and reduce demand and costs in health and social care services. The report makes nine recommendations for improvement, including: for the Welsh Government to set a minimum standard for adaptation work, so people can receive the same standard wherever they live; for local authorities to work more closely with partner agencies who deliver adaptations and streamline the application and delivery processes; and the provision of more accessible versions of information to the public.

The obstacle course: overcoming the barriers to a better later life

CHRISTIE Amelia, McDOWELL Adrian
2017

This report looks at some of the issues older people and their families face in accessing the services and support they need to remain independent and live healthy, enjoyable lives. The report draws on an analysis of calls received to the Independent Age advice Helpline in 2016 and findings from other charities, think tanks and government reports. It focuses on four topic areas: help with serious health needs; understanding social care and the barriers to accessing support when they need personal care and practical help, securing a decent income and access to benefits; and staying in control which looks at some of the major life changes older people can experience, in relation to their finances and housing. For each topic area, the report examines the most common issues older people face and includes individual stories older people and their family members which show the difference early intervention can make, as well as where things are going wrong. It also highlights emerging issues which may get worse in the future, if not addressed. The report concludes that the country is still not responding well enough for a rapidly ageing population. It offers some recommendations to improve health, care and social security services for older people.

Living, not existing: putting prevention at the heart of care for older people in Wales

ROYAL COLLEGE OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPISTS
2017

This report focuses on the important contribution that occupational therapists can make to support further integration of health and social care in Wales. It looks at the role of occupational therapy in helping older people to remain independent and live in their own communities for as long as possible, preventing or delaying the need for expensive care long-term. The report focuses on three key areas: prevention or delaying the need for care and support; helping older people to remain in their communities; and ensuring equality of access to occupational therapy. It provides recommendations to improve the design and delivery of services and examples of best practice and individual case studies to how occupational therapists can contribution to integrated, person-centred services. These include for occupational therapists to work more closely with general practitioners, take on leadership roles to provide expertise to community providers on the development of person and community centred services; and the development of formal partnership agreements across local housing, health and social care sectors to ensure all older people have access to occupational therapy services.

A summary of Age UK's Index of Wellbeing in Later Life

GREEN Marcus, et al
2017

The Wellbeing in Later Life Index, developed by Age UK and the University of Southampton, provides a measure to assess the wellbeing of older people in the UK. The measure looked at wellbeing across 40 indicators covering five key areas – social, personal (living arrangements, thinking skills, family status), health, financial and environmental. This report summarises the work carried out to develop the index and presents results of an analysis of data from 15,000 people aged 60. It provides a picture of older people’s wellbeing across the population and factors that contributed to people having the highest and lowest wellbeing scores. The analysis found that a range of factors under each of the key areas play a part in contributing to a person’s overall sense of wellbeing in later life. It also identified a large gap between older people with the highest and lowest wellbeing. The results identified the importance of being engaged in the world around you, whether through social or creative or physical activities or belonging to a community group. Other domains also played a supporting role, as adequate income, good health, good social network, and access to local facilities make it easier to participate in society. Those in the lowest wellbeing group were more likely to report being on means-tested benefits, having poor health and low satisfaction with local services.

Hidden in plain sight: the unmet mental health needs of older people

STICKLAND Nicolette, GENTRY Tom
2016

Examines the extent to which the current provision of mental health services fails to meet the increasingly high demand from the ageing population. The report shows that currently 3 million people in the UK over the age of 60 are living with depression; this figure is set to rise to 4.3 million in the next 15 years due to the growing number of older people in our society; the NHS is not providing those in later life with mental health problems with sufficient treatment options, such as talking therapies and integrated care plans. The report makes a number of recommendations to build on progress already made and ensure that older people’s mental health gains not only parity of esteem with physical health concerns but parity with other age groups. These include: creation of a work stream dedicated to meeting older people’s mental health needs, as part of the implementation of Mental Health Taskforce recommendations; local health and care commissioners should fully understand the prevalence of common mental health conditions among the over 65s in their areas; each clinical commissioning group and local authority should consider appointing “older people’s mental health champions”; and all services should be appropriately funded and equipped to deliver fully integrated care that addresses mental and physical health and comorbidity.

Evaluation of Prevention Matters

APTELIGEN, et al
2015

An evaluation of Prevention Matters, a whole county change programme designed to facilitate access to frontline community services and groups in Buckinghamshire. The programme targets those whose needs are below the substantial need threshold for adult social care, building on a referral system, rather than on direct support. Fourteen Community Practice Workers (CPWs) are aligned to the seven GP localities in Buckinghamshire, and lead on the referral process, from first contact with the users to final review and exit. The CPWs are supported by seven Community Links Officers who ensure that the necessary resources are available in the community to meet users’ needs, including identification of opportunities to build new capacity. A wide network of frontline community services and groups provides direct face-to-face support to users through activities such as befriending, transport, fitness, and lunch clubs. The evaluation found that the potential to maintain independence and delay access to adult social care may be less than originally intended as a result of the complexity of the needs and frailty of some programme users. Nonetheless, nearly half of all programme users reported improvement in their satisfaction with the level of social contact they had and a third of programme users reported that their quality of life was better at the review stage compared to the time of their baseline assessment. In addition, the evaluation concluded that the programme has been particularly successful at facilitating access to information. The analysis indicates that the benefits associated with the programme are £1,000 per user per year, including the value of the improvements in health suggested by the impact evaluation (£500), and estimated spill-over effects on the need for informal social care (£492). The report also highlights the positive impact on organisations and systems, and increased volunteering capacity and sets out a series of recommendations to strengthen the delivery of the programme.

Evaluation of Redcar and Cleveland Community Agents Project: outputs and outcomes summary report

WATSON Pat, SHUCKSMITH Janet
2015

The Community Agents Project, a programme jointly funded through health and adult social care services, is an innovative approach to meeting the social needs of the elderly and vulnerable population. Community agents act as a one-stop shop, signposting people to the appropriate service that meets their needs. This could be an organisation or voluntary group that can help with shopping, arrange transport to the GP surgery or hospital appointments, help to complete forms, offer encouragement to maintain a care plan, organise a befriender, accompany to a local social activity or signposting to other agencies. The project has received a total of 486 referrals across the borough of Redcar & Cleveland for the period September 2014-September 2015, generating positive outcomes in the following areas: maintaining independence; faster discharge from hospital; reducing admissions to hospital; reducing isolation; improved financial status; appropriate use of health and social services; cost saving; and increases in community capacity. The report estimates a social return on investment of £3.29 for every £1 invested in the Community Agents Project.

Dementia friendly communities: guidance for councils

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION, INNOVATIONS IN DEMENTIA
2015

This guidance looks at current best practice and learning in the creation of dementia friendly communities, how it fits within the broader policy landscape, and what actions councils can take, and are already taking in supporting people with dementia by creating local dementia friendly communities. It illustrates how simple changes to existing services, and awareness raising for those who come into day-to-day contact with people with dementia such as staff working in libraries or in leisure centres, can help people with dementia feel more confident and welcome in using council services. The guide looks at what a dementia friendly community is, why dementia is a key issue for councils and the role councils can play. It then presents a framework to help develop to plan, develop and assess the dementia friendliness of any community, organisation or process. The framework covers five domains: the voices of people with dementia and their supporters, the place, the people, resources, and networks. For each domain information is included on: the background to the issue, key actions that councils can take to make this happen, and examples or case studies of existing practice. The guide for those who have a role in leading, planning, commissioning and delivering public services; including health and wellbeing boards, and those responsible for health and social care services.

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LAUGH research project New practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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