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Results for 'adult social care'

Results 1 - 10 of 34

ConnectWELL

ConnectWELL

Introducing ConnectWELL - a social prescribing service – initially funded and piloted in 2014 by NHS Rugby CCG, which aims to improve health and wellbeing for patients and clients. ConnectWELL provides Health Professionals with just one, straightforward referral route to the many Voluntary and Community Sector organisations, groups and activities that can address underlying societal causes, manage or prevent compounding factors of ill-health. ConnectWELL has over 900 organisations and activities, ranging from Carers’ support, community groups, disability services, Faith / Religious / Cultural Activities, Housing / Homelessness Support, Mentoring, Music Groups, and volunteering opportunities.

Implementing the Care Act 2014:building social resources to prevent, reduce or delay needs for care and support in adult social care in England

TEW Jerry, et al
2019

This Report is based on research into ‘second wave’ approaches to prevention and capacity building that have become more prominent since the implementation of the Care Act 2014. These approaches involve a fundamental revisioning of the role of local services and seek to maximise resources and opportunities through working in more co-productive ways with citizens, families and communities. The findings are based on a national survey of local authorities and in-depth case study research with stakeholders, beneficiaries and family members in seven local authorities which were promoting one or more ‘second wave’ preventative initiatives. A key findings was that a preventative focus is still relatively new in adult social care and that approaches are often embedded within a variety of strategic initiatives, including: strengths-based models of social work and social care practice (such as 3 Conversations); approaches to social networking and building community capacity (such as Local Area Coordination); mobilising the resources of family and personal networks (through approaches such as Family Group Conferencing, peer support or Community Circles) and targeted ‘upstream’ use of personal budgets. Another finding was that overall, financial pressures were seen as the most important driver towards developing preventative activity, but, at the same time, this was also cited most frequently as the greatest barrier. Other frequently cited barriers to progressing the prevention agenda were competing policy imperatives and, in particular, perceived pressure to make rushed decisions in order to minimise delays in hospital discharge. The report also examines wellbeing outcomes and expenditure. The report makes recommendations for the policy, practice and implementation and evaluation contexts. The reports concludes that there is some strong evidence of the creativity and innovation that is taking place in a significant proportion of local authorities. While progress may not be consistent across the sector, the research shows that a sizable proportion of local authorities have been investing in activity that is designed to increase capacity and capability at individual, family and community levels, and thereby to contribute to preventing, reducing or delaying the need for adult social care services.

Prevention in social care: where are we now?

WAVEHILL SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC RESEARCH, SKILLS FOR CARE
2019

This report draws together the main findings from a research study, which aimed to provide an overview of the published and unpublished literature relating to prevention in social care; consult with stakeholders to understand more about engagement with the prevention agenda; and identify examples of practice in England to learn more about how prevention is working in social care. The literature identified five key approaches to prevention: advice and guidance; physical activity promotion; social prescribing; reablement; and asset-based approaches. For each approach, the report provides a brief outline and examples of good practice. The report also looks at the interplay between prevention and the integration agenda, focusing on new care models, wellbeing teams, and new and emerging job roles; explores how to develop capacity in social care, through learning and development resources, use of technology, and commissioning and contracting; and examines the critical factors to effectively implement and embed prevention in practice.

Total transformation of care and support

SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
2017

This updated version of 'Total transformation of care and support: future of care', originally published in 2016, looks at how transformed and integrated health and care could improve outcomes and cost effectiveness of services. It outlines five areas where transformation needs to take place and where health and care systems can help older and disabled people build a good quality life. It identifies six well-evidenced models, which demonstrate how to combine scarce state resources with the capacity of individuals, families and communities. Using data from Birmingham City Council, it explores the potential for scaling up these six schemes, modelling their outcomes, costs and estimated financial benefits. It also highlights key enablers that could help areas implement each scheme. The models cover an initiative to help isolated older people; the Living Well scheme to improve resilience amongst older people; a service to support adults with learning disabilities to become independent; Shared Lives; a scheme to improve hospital discharge, and support for people following a hospital stay. Appendices include a template to help structure conversations with local citizens and stakeholders about transforming. It is the third of SCIE's Future of care series, which aims to stimulate discussion amongst policy-makers and planners about the future of care and support.

The older adults’ NHS and social care return on investment tool: final report

PUBLIC HEALTH ENGLAND
2020

This report summarises the evidence on nine identified interventions to support older people. It is the final report of a project to provide a return on investment (ROI) tool to help stakeholders and decision-makers to compare the cost-effectiveness of interventions to reduce the need for services in older adults. The focus is on the use of social care services, but the report also reviews interventions which also reduced the need for health services. The ROI includes nine interventions, identified though a literature review. They are: community singing; a help at home scheme; a befriending service; the WHELD intervention for people living with dementia in nursing home; the INTERCOM intervention providing hospital discharge support for COPD patients; voluntary and community sector (VCS) services aimed at patients with long-term conditions, which use social prescribing and other approaches to put patients in touch with services; health coaching; the BELLA intervention providing self-management support for COPD patients; and a home care reablement service. An accompanying technical report provides further detail of the literature review, selection of the interventions for inclusion in the tool and the modelling methods. The return investment tool is available to download. It can be adapted to local conditions and presents results showing the economic benefits of each intervention.

Evidence, insight, or intuition? Investment decisions in the commissioning of prevention services for older people

MILLER Robin, et al
2013

English adult social care commissioners are expected to make ‘evidence based’ decisions on how best to invest public sector funding. This study explores the types of evidence that commissioners use in relation to prevention services for older people and the other factors that influence their investment decisions. A study of local authority Directors of Adult Social Services (DASSs) was used to identify three local prevention interventions. Semi-structured interviews with leads for these interventions explored the evidence and other factors that influenced the investment process. Commissioners drew on a variety of published evidence, in particular that deriving from central government and its regional representative bodies, and third sector organizations with specialist knowledge. Local evidence was also generated through the undertaking of pilots and gathering of performance data. Alongside these ‘rational’ decision-making processes were strong political, personal, and relational dimensions related primarily to the influence of elected members and the hierarchical power of DASSs. Capturing experiential evidence and knowledge of service users and frontline practitioners, being clear about expected impacts and monitoring accordingly, and using recognized evaluation tools would provide further local evidence and enable better comparison and sharing across local authorities.

Preventing need and maximising independence: policy scope

RESEARCH IN PRACTICE FOR ADULTS
2013

This policy briefing provides a summary of policy activity in preventive servcies in adult social care, while identifying the key issues, trends and possible future policy direction. The implications for professionals working at a local level and the benefits for service users are also considered.

The older adults’ NHS and social care return on investment tool: technical report

PUBLIC HEALTH ENGLAND
2020

The technical report of a project which aimed to provide a return on investment (ROI) tool to help stakeholders and decision-makers to compare the cost-effectiveness of interventions to reduce the need for services in older adults. This report provides detail of the literature review process, the process of assessment and prioritisation of interventions for inclusion in the tool, and the detailed modelling methods used. Based on evidence from the literature review and through discussion with expert Steering Group members, nine interventions are included in the ROI tool. These are: community singing; a help at home scheme; a befriending service; the WHELD intervention for people living with dementia in nursing home; the INTERCOM intervention providing hospital discharge support for COPD patients; voluntary and community sector (VCS) services aimed at patients with long-term conditions, using social prescribing and other approaches to put patients in touch with services; health coaching delivered by inter-professional health and social care services; the BELLA intervention providing self-management support for COPD patients; and a home care reablement service. The return investment tool is available to download. It can be adapted to local conditions and shows the economic benefits of each intervention.

The lives we want to lead: the LGA green paper for adult social care and wellbeing

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2018

A consultation paper from the Local Government Association, which seeks views on the future of care and support for adults and their unpaid carers. The paper puts forward options to secure the immediate and long-term funding for adult social care, and makes the case for a shift towards preventative, community-based personalised care, which helps maximise people's health, wellbeing and independence. It also considers the importance of housing, public health, other council services, in supporting wellbeing and prevention. Sections cover: differing views about the future of long-term funding for social care; the wider changes needed across care and health to bring out a greater focus on community-based and person-centred prevention; the role of public health and wider council services in supporting and improving wellbeing; and the nature of the relationship between social care and health, integration, accountability and how the new NHS funding could be used for maximum impact. Thirty consultation questions are included throughout the report. The consultation will run until 26 September 2018.

A toolkit to support the commissioning of targeted preventative services: South West regional commissioning

SOUTH WEST JOINT IMPROVEMENT PARTNERSHIP
2010

This toolkit was developed by the Institute of Public Care to help commissioners of adult social care and health services in the South West of England target prevention and early intervention services more effectively, given the prospect of severely limited resources and a significant projected rise in the region’s population of older people. With reduced expenditure per head therefore available, the toolkit aims to help local authorities assess existing services, identify shortcomings, and contribute to the development of new, more effective preventative services. There is a particular focus on identifying individuals likely to come to rely on high-intensity, high-cost services while they are still divertible from that path. This toolkit includes a series of tools templates and performance information frameworks that will help local authorities in the South West and their partners to: develop a more refined framework for understanding the distribution of prevention, early intervention, intervention and substitute support services; analyse the distribution of current services for older people across levels of need and identify where greater targeting of those in need might be effective; and plan how to refocus where greater targeting of those in need might be most effective.

Results 1 - 10 of 34

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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