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Results for 'adults'

Results 1 - 10 of 16

A systematic review to investigate dramatherapy group work with working age adults who have a mental health problem

BOURNE Jane, ANDERSEN-WARREN Madeline, HACKETT Simon
2018

This study investigated the effects of dramatherapy group work with adults between the ages of 18 and 65 years, who have mental health problems. A systematic review was undertaken using a meta-ethnography to synthesise the existing relevant research. Database searches identified 111 records, from which 12 were included in the review. There was a combined total of n = 194 participants from eleven of the studies; plus one study that did not give exact participant numbers. The included studies were either qualitative or mixed method, with a variety of designs: case studies, interviews, focus groups, observations, questionnaires, evaluations, and use of a variety of measurement tools. There was a range of populations, including: adults with intellectual disabilities, adult offenders, community service users, and in-patients. Participants were from a number of different settings. Overall findings were encouraging and included; improvements in social interaction, improved self- awareness, empowerment and social interaction. No negative effects were reported.

Age-friendly and inclusive volunteering: review of community contributions in later life

JOPLING Kate, JONES Dan
2018

This review considers how to enable more people to contribute to their communities, in later life (defined as aged 50 and over), with a focus on increasing participation among underrepresented groups, especially those in poor health or living with long-term health conditions. It covers activities such as neighbourliness, helping in the community and volunteering. It draws on a range of sources including a call for evidence, a call for practice and seven roundtable meetings involving over 100 participants. The report looks at why people get involved with their communities and how contributing to communities can improve social connections, and lead to increased life satisfaction and wellbeing; how volunteering can change across the life course; and the practical, structural and emotional barriers to contributing to communities. It sets out a framework for age-friendly, inclusive volunteering, which includes for volunteering to: be flexible and to fit around life changes; to provide support and training needed; to provide opportunities to be sociable and feel connected; value volunteers; provide meaningful activity; and make good use of strengths and experiences. The review makes recommendations for the voluntary, public and private sectors on how to tackle the barriers to enable people to continue to volunteer throughout their lifetime. Case studies of good practice are included throughout the report.

Effects of forest therapy on depressive symptoms among adults: a systematic review

LEE Insook, et al
2017

This study systematically reviewed forest therapy programs designed to decrease the level of depression among adults and assessed the methodological rigor and scientific evidence quality of existing research studies to guide future studies. This systematic review was conducted in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. The authors independently screened full-text articles from various databases using the following criteria: (1) intervention studies assessing the effects of forest therapy on depressive symptoms in adults aged 18 years and older; (2) studies including at least one control group or condition; (3) peer-reviewed studies; and (4) been published either in English or Korean before July 2016. The Scottish Intercollegiate Guideline Network measurement tool was used to assess the risk of bias in each trial. In the final sample, 28 articles (English: 13, Korean: 15) were included in the systematic review. We concluded that forest therapy is an emerging and effective intervention for decreasing adults' depression levels. However, the included studies lacked methodological rigor. Future studies assessing the long-term effect of forest therapy on depression using rigorous study designs are needed.

Innovative models of health, care and support for adults

SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
2018

This briefing explains that innovative, often small-scale models of health, social care and support for adults could be scaled up to benefit as many people as possible. The challenge is to make scaling up successful. The briefing is based on research conducted during the spring of 2017 by Nesta, SCIE, Shared Lives Plus and PPL. It includes real life examples and case studies to show how stakeholders are involved in building and growing successful and sustainable innovations in health, care and support which provide new ways of delivering relationship-based care. It also identifies key challenges and facilitators to scaling up innovative models and makes recommendations to help make impactful innovative models become part of mainstream care. It includes case studies from North London Carers – a community network of young professionals and older neighbours which helps to reduce loneliness and increase wellbeing; Age UK’s Personalised Integrated Care programme – which brings together voluntary organisations and health and care services to support for older people living with multiple long-term conditions who are at risk of recurring hospital admission; Shared lives - adults either live with or regularly visit their chosen carer; North Yorkshire Innovation Fund – which provides funding to support voluntary and community organisations providing innovative intervention or prevention measures; and Wigan’s place-based approach. To help innovative models to flourish and scale up, it identifies keys to success as: a shared ambition to embed person- and community-centred ways of working; co-production; a new model of leadership which is collaborative and convening; investment and commissioning in approaches which result in high quality outcomes; and use of data to drive change a willingness to learn from experience.

'Three Conversation Model' Transforming Lives Cambridgeshire County Council Adults Learning Disabilities Team

Cambridgeshire County Council

East Cambridgeshire Learning Disability Partnership is a multi disciplinary team providing social care and specialist health input to adults with learning disabilities living in the community. In 2014, Cambridgeshire County Council started its Transforming Lives programme to meet new requirements arising from the Care Act, and as part of this programme the East Cambridgeshire Learning Disability Partnership team began to pilot the Three Conversation Model (pioneered by Partners for Change) in October of that year. The model is now well established in the team and has been rolled out across the council.

Systematic review: music, singing and wellbeing for adults living with diagnosed conditions

DAYKIN Norma, et al
2016

A systematic review of wellbeing outcomes of music and singing for adults, encompassing data from 1364 participants with identified health conditions such as stroke, COPD and mental health conditions. The review does not include clinical studies of music and singing, including interventions for patients in hospital, where the focus is on clinical outcomes such as pain management or coping with symptoms or hospitalisation. The evidence points to wellbeing outcomes including reduced depression and anxiety in people of all ages. In relation to adults with adults with chronic conditions such as stroke, COPD and cancer, the studies report reduced stress and improved wellbeing across a range of outcomes. Specifically, the review finds that there is high quality evidence that: targeted, culturally relevant music interventions can decrease depression in nursing students in a college environment; brief music therapy is an effective intervention to support wellbeing of palliative care patients in hospital settings. There is moderate quality evidence that: targeted, culturally relevant music interventions, including playing a musical instrument and singing, can decrease depression in older people with chronic conditions in residential and community settings; participants report a wide range of wellbeing benefits from singing including relaxation, distraction, reduction in anxiety, spiritual uplifting and improvements in mood, emotional wellbeing, confidence, enjoyment and a ‘feel good factor’; participation in a music project can raise participants’ awareness of the significance of music in their life. This in turn can have a positive effect on awareness of health and quality of life and can encourage behaviour change.

Systematic review: music, singing and wellbeing for adults living with dementia

VICTOR Christina, et al
2016

A systematic review of the subjective, self-reported wellbeing outcomes of music and singing in adults living with dementia. The review encompasses data from 249 participants in quantitative and qualitative studies from Australia, Canada, Finland, France, and the United Kingdom. It encompasses interventions focusing upon singing or listening to music. Three key domains of wellbeing are reported: quality of life, depression and anxiety. Studies and findings where the methodology entails observation by a researcher or clinician of the effects of music and singing on the wellbeing of people with dementia were excluded. In addition, the review excluded studies where the outcome was defined in terms of dementia or clinical symptoms or where the focus was on outcomes for carers. Given these caveats the key findings are that for people with dementia music and signing are important aspects of subjective wellbeing that can promote domains of subjective wellbeing, social connections and maintenance of identity. Active participation seemed to be less beneficial than listening to music but this is only a very tentative finding which needs support by further research. On the current evidence base, the review supports the development of policy and practice of support for music and singing interventions for wellbeing outcomes for people with dementia but suggests that interventions should reflect both active and passive forms of engagement.

Review of the grey literature: music, singing and wellbeing

DAYKIN Norma, et al
2016

This report reviews evidence from the grey literature on wellbeing outcomes for music and singing for adults. The evidence was received through a call for evidence placed on the What Works Wellbeing website in 2016. A total of 51 reports were received, of which 32 met the inclusion criteria. These included: 12 reports on music and singing interventions with healthy adults; 12 reports on participants with a range of diagnosed conditions including COPD, Parkinson’s, stroke and mental health conditions; and eight reports on participants living with dementia. An additional five unpublished PhDs were also identified. The report summarises the evaluation methods used in the projects; quantitative and qualitative wellbeing outcomes identified; and process evaluations carried out. The review found evidence of improved mental wellbeing in evaluations of two singing interventions for people in the community experiencing, or at risk of, mental health problems. Two studies of music interventions for older participants in hospital also reported improvements in observed wellbeing. Qualitative findings also suggest that participants involved in singing and music projects report positive outcomes such as improved mood, purpose and social interaction. Adults with dementia also experienced increased engagement, relaxation, and better connection with others. Key issues reported from process evaluations included: barriers to activity, such as lack of accessible transport; institutional barriers, particularly in care home settings where projects rely on the support of care staff and managers. Limitations of the evidence are also briefly discussed.

Stay Up Late

Stay Up Late

Stay Up Late initiated as a campaign, set up by the punk band Heavy Load who played at many learning disability social clubs and discos, but were frustrated seeing the venues empty at around 9pm. They wanted to challenge and transform the practice of care homes and support workers operating strict rotas, thus excluding a whole population from enjoying late evenings socialising.

Mates 'n Dates

Guideposts Trust

"Before I joined Mates and Dates I didn’t go out in the evening unless it was a family occasion. Now I can look forward to going out once a month and to dates with my girlfriend in-between. It gives me something to look forward to.”

Results 1 - 10 of 16

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LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project New practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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