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Results for 'adults'

Results 1 - 10 of 12

'Three Conversation Model' Transforming Lives Cambridgeshire County Council Adults Learning Disabilities Team

Cambridgeshire County Council

East Cambridgeshire Learning Disability Partnership is a multi disciplinary team providing social care and specialist health input to adults with learning disabilities living in the community. In 2014, Cambridgeshire County Council started its Transforming Lives programme to meet new requirements arising from the Care Act, and as part of this programme the East Cambridgeshire Learning Disability Partnership team began to pilot the Three Conversation Model (pioneered by Partners for Change) in October of that year. The model is now well established in the team and has been rolled out across the council.

Systematic review: music, singing and wellbeing for adults living with diagnosed conditions

DAYKIN Norma, et al
2016

A systematic review of wellbeing outcomes of music and singing for adults, encompassing data from 1364 participants with identified health conditions such as stroke, COPD and mental health conditions. The review does not include clinical studies of music and singing, including interventions for patients in hospital, where the focus is on clinical outcomes such as pain management or coping with symptoms or hospitalisation. The evidence points to wellbeing outcomes including reduced depression and anxiety in people of all ages. In relation to adults with adults with chronic conditions such as stroke, COPD and cancer, the studies report reduced stress and improved wellbeing across a range of outcomes. Specifically, the review finds that there is high quality evidence that: targeted, culturally relevant music interventions can decrease depression in nursing students in a college environment; brief music therapy is an effective intervention to support wellbeing of palliative care patients in hospital settings. There is moderate quality evidence that: targeted, culturally relevant music interventions, including playing a musical instrument and singing, can decrease depression in older people with chronic conditions in residential and community settings; participants report a wide range of wellbeing benefits from singing including relaxation, distraction, reduction in anxiety, spiritual uplifting and improvements in mood, emotional wellbeing, confidence, enjoyment and a ‘feel good factor’; participation in a music project can raise participants’ awareness of the significance of music in their life. This in turn can have a positive effect on awareness of health and quality of life and can encourage behaviour change.

Systematic review: music, singing and wellbeing for adults living with dementia

VICTOR Christina, et al
2016

A systematic review of the subjective, self-reported wellbeing outcomes of music and singing in adults living with dementia. The review encompasses data from 249 participants in quantitative and qualitative studies from Australia, Canada, Finland, France, and the United Kingdom. It encompasses interventions focusing upon singing or listening to music. Three key domains of wellbeing are reported: quality of life, depression and anxiety. Studies and findings where the methodology entails observation by a researcher or clinician of the effects of music and singing on the wellbeing of people with dementia were excluded. In addition, the review excluded studies where the outcome was defined in terms of dementia or clinical symptoms or where the focus was on outcomes for carers. Given these caveats the key findings are that for people with dementia music and signing are important aspects of subjective wellbeing that can promote domains of subjective wellbeing, social connections and maintenance of identity. Active participation seemed to be less beneficial than listening to music but this is only a very tentative finding which needs support by further research. On the current evidence base, the review supports the development of policy and practice of support for music and singing interventions for wellbeing outcomes for people with dementia but suggests that interventions should reflect both active and passive forms of engagement.

Review of the grey literature: music, singing and wellbeing

DAYKIN Norma, et al
2016

This report reviews evidence from the grey literature on wellbeing outcomes for music and singing for adults. The evidence was received through a call for evidence placed on the What Works Wellbeing website in 2016. A total of 51 reports were received, of which 32 met the inclusion criteria. These included: 12 reports on music and singing interventions with healthy adults; 12 reports on participants with a range of diagnosed conditions including COPD, Parkinson’s, stroke and mental health conditions; and eight reports on participants living with dementia. An additional five unpublished PhDs were also identified. The report summarises the evaluation methods used in the projects; quantitative and qualitative wellbeing outcomes identified; and process evaluations carried out. The review found evidence of improved mental wellbeing in evaluations of two singing interventions for people in the community experiencing, or at risk of, mental health problems. Two studies of music interventions for older participants in hospital also reported improvements in observed wellbeing. Qualitative findings also suggest that participants involved in singing and music projects report positive outcomes such as improved mood, purpose and social interaction. Adults with dementia also experienced increased engagement, relaxation, and better connection with others. Key issues reported from process evaluations included: barriers to activity, such as lack of accessible transport; institutional barriers, particularly in care home settings where projects rely on the support of care staff and managers. Limitations of the evidence are also briefly discussed.

Stay Up Late

Stay Up Late

Stay Up Late initiated as a campaign, set up by the punk band Heavy Load who played at many learning disability social clubs and discos, but were frustrated seeing the venues empty at around 9pm. They wanted to challenge and transform the practice of care homes and support workers operating strict rotas, thus excluding a whole population from enjoying late evenings socialising.

Mates 'n Dates

Guideposts Trust

"Before I joined Mates and Dates I didn’t go out in the evening unless it was a family occasion. Now I can look forward to going out once a month and to dates with my girlfriend in-between. It gives me something to look forward to.”

Evaluation of the Reducing Social Isolation and Loneliness grant fund: evaluation final report

ROBERTS Lauren
2016

Final evaluation of the Reducing Social Isolation and Loneliness Grant programme, designed to encourage the voluntary and community sector (VCS) to develop innovative approaches to reduce social isolation and loneliness amongst Manchester residents aged 50 plus. The programme was commissioned and funded by North, Central and South Manchester Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs), and administered and managed by Manchester Community Central (Macc). It awarded nine large (£10,000-£50,000) and eighteen small grants (less than £10,000) to local VCS organisations across Manchester's three Clinical Commissioning Group areas. This report provides an overview of the programme and discusses evidence of impact in the following areas: reducing social isolation and loneliness; improving confidence and independence; and improving health, wellbeing and quality of life. It also looks at learning from the project around identifying socially isolated and lonely people and engaging with, and retaining, people's involvement in initiatives. The evaluation reported increased social connections, with almost all respondents (97 per cent) meeting new people through the project; the creation of new friendships; increased quality of life; and improvements in self-reported health. It demonstrates that VCS-led model are capable of delivering desired outcomes and also highlights the importance of effective partnership arrangements between VCS umbrella organisations and CCG funders. Individual case studies showcasing learning and impact evidence from the individual projects are included in the appendices.

Response to the regulations and guidance of the Care Act 2014: section 2: prevention, reducing or delaying needs

CARE AND SUPPORT ALLIANCE
2015

Sets out the response of the Care and Support Alliance to the Government consultation on draft regulations and guidance of the Care Act 2014. The response focuses on section 2 which covers prevention, reducing or delaying needs. Overall, the Alliance is pleased with the draft of both the regulations and guidance, but notes areas that could be strengthened and identifies scope to improve the read across to other chapters. Areas covered in the response include the description of prevention used and the examples of preventative services and resources listed in the guidance.

Inclusive integration: how whole person care can work for adults with disabilities

BROADBRIDGE Angela
2014

This report focusses on meeting the needs of working-age disabled adults as health and social care services are increasing integrated. It provides an empirical evidence base to demonstrate how whole person care (which is about making the connections between physical health, mental health and social care services) can be used to effectively meet these needs. The report also draws on the findings of a focus group with 12 disabled adults and carers on desired outcomes from the integration of health and social care services. Interviews with social care and voluntary sector professionals, commissioners and local authority policy to see if they are willing to include working-age disabled adults' needs in plans for future integration. The report looks at how working-age disabled adults have different needs and outcomes from older people and identifies the health inequalities they face in day-to-day life. Ten dimensions of health inequality are identified including housing, employment, financial security and quality of life. The report makes seven recommendations to inform the service response, including: taking a long term view of managing long-term conditions, viewing whole person care as a 10-year journey with matched by stable funding; debates on funding gap in social care should give consideration to the needs of working-age disabled adults; shifting resources from case management to community coordinated care to support prevention and providing a single point of contact for health and social care needs; service integration should take place across a much wider range of services to meet the needs of disabled people.

The adult social care outcomes framework 2014/15: handbook of definitions

GREAT BRITAIN. Department of Health
2014

This handbook sets out the indicators for measuring adult social care outcomes in 2014 and 2015 using the Adult Social Care Outcomes Framework (ASCOF). The framework is designed to support councils to improve the quality of care and support services they provide and give a national overview of adult social care outcomes. The handbook provides technical detail of each measure, with examples to minimise confusion and inconsistency in reporting and interpretation. The indicators are structured around the four key domains set out in the framework, including: enhancing quality of life for people with care and support needs; delaying and reducing the need for care and support; ensuring people have a positive experience of care and support; and safeguarding people whose circumstances make them vulnerable and protecting from avoidable harm.

Results 1 - 10 of 12

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