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Results for 'advice services'

Results 1 - 10 of 19

Preventative support for adult carers in Wales: rapid review

SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
2018

This rapid review, commissioned by Social Care Wales, draws on research published since 2012 to identify emerging and promising practice in adult carers support. It focuses on support that takes a preventative approach by providing information and support to reduce or prevent the likelihood of carer crisis and breakdown, and improve the overall quality of carers’ lives. The review identifies key characteristics of effective preventative support services. It presents the review findings across the following key themes: identification and recognition of carers; the provision of information, advice and assistance; and supporting carers for a life outside of their caring role, through services such as respite and short breaks, emotional and employment support. Examples of services and interventions from Wales and England are included throughout. The final section looks at the available evidence on evaluating what works for carers.

Improving outcomes for carers via GP surgeries: implications for commissioners

OXFORD BROOKES UNIVERSITY. Institute of Public Care, CARERS BUCKS
2017

Reports on a pilot project, funded by the Chiltern Clinical Commissioning Group, which sought to help GPs identify previously unknown carers and improve carer experience and wellbeing outcomes. The pilot offered carers a free health and wellbeing check with a carer support worker and a social prescription to access services provided by Carers Bucks where appropriate. The health and wellbeing check used the 'Carers Star' covering seven outcome areas: health, the caring role, managing at home, time for yourself, how you feel, finances, and work. A total of 203 carers attended the carer clinics. Approximately a quarter of carers were caring for someone with dementia and a quarter were caring for someone with a physical disability. Analysis of comments received by carers attending the clinic identified three key themes: carers appreciated the clinics because they felt it was rare for anyone to ‘care’ for them; carers felt listened to; and received useful information about support they did not know existed. The paper maps learning from the project against the Institute of Public Care commissioning cycle and makes recommendations for commissioners.

Joining the dots: integrating practical support in mental healthcare settings in England

ISAKSEN Mette, WILLIAMS Richard
2017

This report provides an analysis of the advice needs of Citizens Advice clients in England who report having a mental health problem. It shows how recognising the links between people’s mental health and their wider practical problems is crucial both for preventing mental health problems from escalating and improving recovery rates. The report draws on the results of an analysis of client data, a survey of Citizens Advice advisors and a survey of 2,000 people across England. The analysis shows that a growing number of people who turn to Citizens Advice for advice report having mental health problems. In addition, clients with mental health problems tend to have more complex, urgent and multiple advice needs. The report uses Citizen Advice data to explore the advice needs of people with mental health problems across the areas of: finance, essential services, housing, employment, and benefits. It also provides evidence to show that the provision of practical advice and support alongside mental health services can improve patient wellbeing and outcomes and reduce demand on public services. Despite this, the research found that less than a third of people (32 per cent) nationally who access NHS services are referred to advice services, while twice as many (64 per cent) said this would be helpful. The report recommends that service providers should take action to ensure they are responding effectively to the needs of people with mental health problems and calls for government to fund a pilot for integrated practical support in primary mental healthcare settings.

Carers Leeds

Carers Leeds

Carers Leeds is an independent charity that gives support, advice and information to unpaid carers aged 16 and over, which in turn seeks to improve their overall physical, mental health and wellbeing. Established in 1996, a team of expert Carer Support Workers are dedicated to improving the lives of the 72,000 carers in Leeds. Carers Leeds seeks to address both national and local policy of people with care needs being supported in the community and to remain at home, when possible. In many instances, this support is provided by a family member or friend. For this to be sustainable, carers need to be able to look after their own health and social care needs which is why support services directly to support carers are vital.

The Lightbulb project: switched on to integration in Leicestershire

MORAN Alison
2017

A case study of the Lightbulb project, which brings together County and District Councils and other partners in Leicestershire to help people stay in their homes for as long as possible. The approach includes GPs and other health and care professionals and relies on early at home assessment process at key points of entry. This is delivered through a ‘hub and spoke’ model with an integrated Locality Lightbulb Team in each District Council area and covers: minor adaptations and equipment; DFGs; wider housing support needs (warmth, energy, home security); housing related health and wellbeing (AT, falls prevention); planning for the future (housing options); and housing related advice, information, and signposting. The Lightbulb service also includes a cost effective specialist Hospital Housing Enabler Team based in acute and mental health hospital settings across Leicestershire. The team work directly with patients and hospital staff to identify and resolve housing issues that are a potential barrier to hospital discharge and also provide low level support to assist with the move home from hospital to help prevent readmissions.

A very general practice: how much time do GPs spend on issues other than health

CAPER Kathleen, PLUNKETT James
2015

Drawing on the results of interviews with 824 general practitioners (GPs) in England carried out in 2015, this briefing looks at the amount of time and money GPs spend dealing with non-health issues. GPs responding to the survey report spending almost a fifth of their time on social issues that are not principally about health, including relationship problems, housing, unemployment and social isolation. This time has an implied cost to the health service of almost £400 million a year. Although approximately half the GPs surveyed said that time spent on non-health issues helped them understand their local community, this can leave less time for other patients' health care needs. In addition, many issues raised with GPs, require specialist knowledge that many GPs do not have. Whist the report acknowledges that discussion of non-health issues can be helpful in developing GP-patient relationships, it concludes that finding other ways to meet some of the non-health demand facing GPs would free up time and money to be reinvested in patient care. Possible suggestions put forward include the co-locating of non-health services and advice services in GP surgeries and ensuring GPs know how to best signpost patients to other local services in the community.

Stockton Borough Council's Multi-Disciplinary Service

Stockton-on-Tees Borough Council

Stockton Borough Council established a Multi-Disciplinary Service (MDS) in October 2015, as part of their Better Care Fund plan. The process of designing and implementing the service was through creating a partnership with all key stakeholders in across health, social care and the voluntary sector: Hartlepool and Stockton-on-Tees CCG - Health Commissioners; Stockton-on-Tees Borough Council - Social Care; North Tees and Hartlepool FT - Acute and Community Health; Tees Esk and Wear Valleys FT - Mental Health Trust; and the Voluntary Community and Social Enterprise sector. The executive management teams of all partner organisations signed up to the MDS and have continued to support its development though regular updates at the Joint Health and Wellbeing Board.

The role of advice services in health outcomes: evidence review and mapping study

PARKINSON Andy, BUTTRICK Jamie
2015

Evidence review, undertaken through a joint project between the Low Commission and the Advice Services Alliance, to examine the impact of social welfare advice services on health outcomes. The review outlines key findings from 140 research studies and also provides an overview of 58 integrated health and welfare advice services. Advice services covered in the review included those providing advice on debts, welfare benefits, housing, employment and discrimination advice. The results of the evidence review are discussed across the following areas: health inequalities; debt and mental health; primary care; secondary and tertiary care, including mental health services. The analysis finds that welfare advice provided in health context results in better individual health and well-being and lower demand for health services. Positive effects on health and welbeing include: lower stress and anxiety, better sleeping patterns, more effective use of medication, smoking cessation, and improved diet and physical activity. It shows how the right welfare advice in the right place produces real benefits for patient health especially where advice services work directly with the NHS and care providers, and presents evidence to show that early and effective advice provision reduces demand on the NHS. It provides recommendations for NHS, Local Authority Commissioners, Health and Wellbeing Boards, and the advice sector for the use welfare advice services to improve health outcomes, address health inequalities and reduce demand on the NHS.

Social value of local area coordination in Derby: a forecast social return on investment analysis for Derby City Council

MARSH Hannah
2016

Presents the findings of a forecast analysis of the social value of local area coordination in Derby. The aim of local area coordination is to support residents in the local community to ‘get a life, not a service’, empowering individuals to find community based solutions instead of relying on services. The analysis demonstrates that over the three year forecast period with 10 local area coordinators, local area coordination would deliver significant social value with up to £4 of value for every £1 invested. Further expansion of the service to 17 local area coordinators across all wards would see this value increase further with an increased number of individuals receiving the support. The report highlights that local area coordination is delivering significant benefit to individuals in the community by increasing their overall health and wellbeing. In addition, other stakeholders and the wider community also benefit from local area coordination with community groups forming to address need and benefiting from the promotion through coordinators. The report sets out key recommendations to further optimise the social value created through this service and to better capture the impact and inform future evaluations.

More than medicine: new services for people powered health

LANGFORD Katharine, BAECK Peter, HAMPSON Martha
2013

Examines the constitutive elements of the ‘more than medicine’ approach, looking at social prescribing, signposting through link workers, health trainers and navigators, and community-based services. ‘More than medicine’ creates a set of tools for clinicians to use with patients to address the behavioural and social aspects of long term conditions. It connects the clinical consultation with interventions such as peer support groups, debt counselling, walking groups, befriending, one-to-one coaching and community cooking classes that help people to manage their long-term conditions and improve their health and wellbeing. These activities, places and people help service users and patients to live healthier lives, make friends and learn new skills. The report provides a description of each element of ‘more than medicine’ - social prescribing, signposting and community services - and illustrates the discussion with case studies and summaries of the evidence.

Results 1 - 10 of 19

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LAUGH research project New practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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