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Results for 'advice services'

Results 1 - 10 of 16

Carers Leeds

Carers Leeds

Carers Leeds is an independent charity that gives support, advice and information to unpaid carers aged 16 and over, which in turn seeks to improve their overall physical, mental health and wellbeing. Established in 1996, a team of expert Carer Support Workers are dedicated to improving the lives of the 72,000 carers in Leeds. Carers Leeds seeks to address both national and local policy of people with care needs being supported in the community and to remain at home, when possible. In many instances, this support is provided by a family member or friend. For this to be sustainable, carers need to be able to look after their own health and social care needs which is why support services directly to support carers are vital.

The Lightbulb project: switched on to integration in Leicestershire

MORAN Alison
2017

A case study of the Lightbulb project, which brings together County and District Councils and other partners in Leicestershire to help people stay in their homes for as long as possible. The approach includes GPs and other health and care professionals and relies on early at home assessment process at key points of entry. This is delivered through a ‘hub and spoke’ model with an integrated Locality Lightbulb Team in each District Council area and covers: minor adaptations and equipment; DFGs; wider housing support needs (warmth, energy, home security); housing related health and wellbeing (AT, falls prevention); planning for the future (housing options); and housing related advice, information, and signposting. The Lightbulb service also includes a cost effective specialist Hospital Housing Enabler Team based in acute and mental health hospital settings across Leicestershire. The team work directly with patients and hospital staff to identify and resolve housing issues that are a potential barrier to hospital discharge and also provide low level support to assist with the move home from hospital to help prevent readmissions.

A very general practice: how much time do GPs spend on issues other than health

CAPER Kathleen, PLUNKETT James
2015

Drawing on the results of interviews with 824 general practitioners (GPs) in England carried out in 2015, this briefing looks at the amount of time and money GPs spend dealing with non-health issues. GPs responding to the survey report spending almost a fifth of their time on social issues that are not principally about health, including relationship problems, housing, unemployment and social isolation. This time has an implied cost to the health service of almost £400 million a year. Although approximately half the GPs surveyed said that time spent on non-health issues helped them understand their local community, this can leave less time for other patients' health care needs. In addition, many issues raised with GPs, require specialist knowledge that many GPs do not have. Whist the report acknowledges that discussion of non-health issues can be helpful in developing GP-patient relationships, it concludes that finding other ways to meet some of the non-health demand facing GPs would free up time and money to be reinvested in patient care. Possible suggestions put forward include the co-locating of non-health services and advice services in GP surgeries and ensuring GPs know how to best signpost patients to other local services in the community.

Stockton Borough Council's Multi-Disciplinary Service

Stockton Borough Council

Stockton Borough Council established a Multi-Disciplinary Service (MDS) in October 2015, as part of their Better Care Fund plan. The process of designing and implementing the service was through creating a partnership with all key stakeholders in across health, social care and the voluntary sector: Hartlepool and Stockton-on-Tees CCG - Health Commissioners; Stockton-on-Tees Borough Council - Social Care; North Tees and Hartlepool FT - Acute and Community Health; Tees Esk and Wear Valleys FT - Mental Health Trust; and the Voluntary Community and Social Enterprise sector. The executive management teams of all partner organisations signed up to the MDS and have continued to support its development though regular updates at the Joint Health and Wellbeing Board.

The role of advice services in health outcomes: evidence review and mapping study

PARKINSON Andy, BUTTRICK Jamie
2015

Evidence review, undertaken through a joint project between the Low Commission and the Advice Services Alliance, to examine the impact of social welfare advice services on health outcomes. The review outlines key findings from 140 research studies and also provides an overview of 58 integrated health and welfare advice services. Advice services covered in the review included those providing advice on debts, welfare benefits, housing, employment and discrimination advice. The results of the evidence review are discussed across the following areas: health inequalities; debt and mental health; primary care; secondary and tertiary care, including mental health services. The analysis finds that welfare advice provided in health context results in better individual health and well-being and lower demand for health services. Positive effects on health and welbeing include: lower stress and anxiety, better sleeping patterns, more effective use of medication, smoking cessation, and improved diet and physical activity. It shows how the right welfare advice in the right place produces real benefits for patient health especially where advice services work directly with the NHS and care providers, and presents evidence to show that early and effective advice provision reduces demand on the NHS. It provides recommendations for NHS, Local Authority Commissioners, Health and Wellbeing Boards, and the advice sector for the use welfare advice services to improve health outcomes, address health inequalities and reduce demand on the NHS.

Social value of local area coordination in Derby: a forecast social return on investment analysis for Derby City Council

MARSH Hannah
2016

Presents the findings of a forecast analysis of the social value of local area coordination in Derby. The aim of local area coordination is to support residents in the local community to ‘get a life, not a service’, empowering individuals to find community based solutions instead of relying on services. The analysis demonstrates that over the three year forecast period with 10 local area coordinators, local area coordination would deliver significant social value with up to £4 of value for every £1 invested. Further expansion of the service to 17 local area coordinators across all wards would see this value increase further with an increased number of individuals receiving the support. The report highlights that local area coordination is delivering significant benefit to individuals in the community by increasing their overall health and wellbeing. In addition, other stakeholders and the wider community also benefit from local area coordination with community groups forming to address need and benefiting from the promotion through coordinators. The report sets out key recommendations to further optimise the social value created through this service and to better capture the impact and inform future evaluations.

More than medicine: new services for people powered health

LANGFORD Katharine, BAECK Peter, HAMPSON Martha
2013

Examines the constitutive elements of the ‘more than medicine’ approach, looking at social prescribing, signposting through link workers, health trainers and navigators, and community-based services. ‘More than medicine’ creates a set of tools for clinicians to use with patients to address the behavioural and social aspects of long term conditions. It connects the clinical consultation with interventions such as peer support groups, debt counselling, walking groups, befriending, one-to-one coaching and community cooking classes that help people to manage their long-term conditions and improve their health and wellbeing. These activities, places and people help service users and patients to live healthier lives, make friends and learn new skills. The report provides a description of each element of ‘more than medicine’ - social prescribing, signposting and community services - and illustrates the discussion with case studies and summaries of the evidence.

Community navigation in Brighton and Hove: evaluation of a social prescribing pilot

FARENDEN Clair, et al
2015

An evaluation of the community navigation service, a one-year social prescribing pilot. The model for the pilot was based on Age UK national templates, drawing from their vast knowledge and experience of delivering other similar services across the UK. Community navigators work in GP surgeries to assess patients non-medical support needs and help them access groups, services and activities that can broadly improve their health and wellbeing. The evaluation found that navigation is effective for patients, GP surgeries and volunteers. Patients feel listened to and understood by navigators, have increased access to the right services at the right time and are able to take the next steps towards improving their health and wellbeing. GPs continue to increase referrals, are satisfied with the quality of the service and are seeing positive benefits for their patients. Navigators value their volunteering role and suggest the training and support provided by the staff team enables them to carry it out effectively. 393 patients were referred across 16 surgeries during the first 12 months of the pilot and 741 referrals were made to groups, services and activities patients would not have otherwise accessed. The service attracted a highly experienced and skilled volunteer team to carry out the community navigator role. Most navigators have a previous or current career in healthcare, social services, teaching or counselling. The evaluation examines in detail: the impact on primary and secondary care; community navigation activities, outputs and outcomes; the social value; cost-benefit analysis; lessons, challenges and successes; and risk and opportunities. A set of key recommendations derived from the learning from the pilot are included.

Social prescribing: a review of the evidence

KINSELLA Sarah
2016

A brief review of the literature on social prescribing. Social prescribing is a way of linking primary care patients with psycho-social issues, with sources of appropriate, non-medical support in the community. Suitable referrals to social prescribing initiatives are vulnerable and at risk groups such as: people with mild to moderate depression and anxiety; low income single parents; recently bereaved older people; people with long term conditions and frequent attendees in primary and secondary care. The review highlights that prescribed activities have typically included arts and creative activities, physical activity, learning and volunteering opportunities and courses, self-care and support with practical issues such as benefits, housing, debt and employment. The evidence on the impact of social prescribing is currently limited and inconsistent. While some initiatives have shown improved outcomes for patients and potential for cost-savings (in the longer term), few have been subject to economic analysis or the kind of rigorous evaluation which would inform commissioners. The report recommends that any new, local social prescribing initiatives should aim to add to the current evidence base and conduct transparent and thorough.

Supporting the independence of older people: are councils doing enough?

THOMAS Huw Vaughan
2015

This report examines how effective councils in Wales have been in providing strategic leadership on older person’s issues. It analyses the Welsh Government’s and councils’ budgets, looking at the range and availability of preventative services across Wales, focusing on four core aspects that support older people to continue to live independently: practical support services; community based facilities; advice and information services; and housing and housing based services. The report also assesses councils’ performance management arrangements for overseeing services to older people, examining the information that is used by councils to judge performance. The review argues that Councils’ strategies and leadership focus too much on delivery of social services and do not always recognise the important contribution that other services can make in supporting and sustaining the independence of older people. Despite some innovative examples of councils supporting older people, the wider preventative services that can help reduce demand for health and social services are undervalued. A lack of data is making it difficult for councils to demonstrate the impact of their services in supporting the independence of older people, and this weakens their decision making and scrutiny when setting future priorities.

Results 1 - 10 of 16

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