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Results for 'advice services'

Results 1 - 10 of 24

Local Area Coordination (IOW) evaluation report: “What is it about Local Area Coordination that makes it work for end users, under what circumstances, how and why?”

MASON James, HARRIS Kevin, RYAN Louise
2019

This evaluation report draws upon the findings of a realist evaluation of the LAC on the Isle of Wight (IOW) to establish how and why the programme worked for people and communities across three demographical areas. As a sample this focused on the first three Local Area Coordinators to mobilise LAC representative of Ryde, Shanklin and Freshwater. The methods selected for this study were made up of Q-method (Watts and Stenner, 2012) and realist interviews. Q-method focuses on subjective viewpoints of its participants asking them to decide what is meaningful and what does (and what does not) have value and significance from their perspective. Q-Method involves developing a set of statements representing a set of viewpoints of certain individuals about an issue or programme. In this case a set of statements about LAC on the IOW were produced and ranked in line with most important to most un-important by end users. These rankings were then analysed to produce holistic narratives illustrating shared viewpoints around how and why LAC worked. This was also supported by realist interviews which sought to further investigate the key mechanisms at play within LAC on the IOW. The findings of the evaluation established that listening, trust and time were consistent across the three Local Area Coordinators sampled in the evaluation. The coordinator also needs to continue to build on relationships with the differing referral groups due to the variety of methods used to make individuals aware of Local Area Coordination. However, it was also quite clear that LAC worked for different end users in different ways with the Q study creating three different subgroups of end users experiencing LAC: subgroup 1 – “I know you are there and that means a lot, but I’m building my own social networks”; subgroup 2 – “Thank you for your support, I’ve come a long way”; subgroup 3 – “I’m moving down the path, but I still need your personalised support”. The findings demonstrate that LAC works for different people in different ways. Within the spirit of the realist approach to the evaluation the three subgroup holistic narratives provide an insight into what works for whom in what circumstances and why.

Evaluation of Leicestershire Local Area Coordination: final report

M·E·L RESEARCH
2020

This evaluation of Leicestershire Local Area Coordination (LAC) has comprised both formative (process) and summative (outcome) elements. LAC is a complex community-based intervention, delivered in 10 very different local areas in four of the County’s Districts, operationally delivered by 8 Coordinators with varied backgrounds and different working styles. It is designed to have an impact on three levels: individual, community, and health and social care integration. The evaluation finds that LAC has been effective in achieving its ‘founding’ aims and strategic objectives for individuals (a strong focus on assets-based approaches and a community model of delivery, aimed at ‘upstream prevention’ working with vulnerable residents at risk of crisis). LAC has been moderately effective in achieving its aims and objectives around HSC integration but has been less effective in delivering its’ community-based objectives. The SROI findings provide positive evidence of measurable outcomes for LAC, demonstrating positive SROI ratio of £4.10 in accumulated benefit for every £1 spent. It has been more challenging to make LAC successful (and therefore LAC is likely to have less impact for residents) in areas with less community infrastructure; and as LAC is not a prescriptive service, the impact of LAC for some beneficiaries may be lessened as they may not be ready to take the steps to help them move forward. The most successful elements of LAC have comprised: the relationships between coordinators, and beneficiaries and local partners – trust, flexibility and effective networking; coordinator knowledge of local assets and ability to match this with beneficiary support needs; coordinators being located within the communities they work; the lack of specific agenda for coordinators making them less threatening; and the personal skills and commitment of the coordinator team.

Building community capacity: making an economic case

KNAPP Martin, et al
2010

The Coalition Government’s vision, the Big Society, includes ideas for increasing local involvement, moving the provision of services and decision-making closer to local communities. Volunteering is strongly encouraged, as is the creation of social enterprises and other organisations with charitable status which may be able to take over local services currently run by the state. Independent community organisers are also proposed as part of these new developments. This small research project aimed to investigate the economic consequences which follow from initiatives of this type. The approach taken was to use the findings from previous studies, combined with the expertise of people delivering services and shaping initiatives, to produce simple simulations. Each simulation sought to mimic the pathways that people might follow, whether through services or through ‘life events’ such as getting a job, or in terms of changes in their wellbeing. The aim was to investigate the economic impact of the community capacity-building initiative compared to what would happen in the absence of such an initiative. The study covers 3 examples of ways in which community capacity can be built: time banks; befriending; and debt and benefits advice from community navigators. It focuses on the costs of these projects and on the monetary value of some of their consequences. These calculations demonstrate that each of these community initiatives generate net economic benefits in quite a short time period.

The 'front door' to adult social care

AUDITOR GENERAL FOR WALES
2019

To meet the aims of the Social Services and Well-being (Wales) Act 2014, local authorities need to have created a comprehensive ‘front door’ to social care and to have in places an effective Information, Advice and Assistance (IAA) service. This audit report considers the effectiveness of IAA services in Wales, the availability of preventative and community-based support, and the systems put in place to ensure those who need care and support or are at risk are identified and helped. It also considers the impact of the front door on demand for social care and in respect of improving wellbeing. Although local authorities are supporting people to access a wider range of support options, there is a lack of comprehensive understanding of what is available and the preventative services that are needed. It also found that carers are still not getting equal access to the services they need. Based on the findings, the report concludes that councils are preventing social-care demand, but there is variation in the availability, accessibility and quality of information, advice and assistance services. It makes recommendations to help improve access to information, advice and assistance services.

Health at home: a new health and wellbeing model for social housing tenants

PEABODY
2018

Explores how housing support services and community-based health services can deliver effective services at lower cost; encourage self-care for the most vulnerable customers and reduce dependency on direct support; work with other agencies to ensure a coordinated response to the residents’ complex and multiple health needs. The report sets out the findings of a study which aimed to test a person-centred support model using a randomised control trial of 261 general needs residents aged over 50. The service model employed health navigators and volunteers to coach and connect residents with the relevant health, housing and community services they need. The study used to measurement tools to assess impact: the Patient Activation Measure (PAM) and Coaching for Activation (CFA). The study found that three months of intervention with those who started in PAM Level 2 was sufficient to move them up, on average, an entire PAM level. This increase in activation was sustained for at least nine months after the intervention ended, suggesting that participants gained the skills and confidence to effectively manage their health without further support after the initial intensive intervention. This is significant as one of the largest studies into cost reductions from PAM level changes in the United States found that patients who moved from Level 2 to Level 3 reduced their annual healthcare costs by 12%. Existing evidence also indicates that when people become more active in self-care, they benefit from better health outcomes, and fewer unplanned health admissions. The report concludes that there is a clear and compelling case for continuing to support integrated care and strengthen links between the health and housing agendas.

Preventative support for adult carers in Wales: rapid review

SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
2018

This rapid review, commissioned by Social Care Wales, draws on research published since 2012 to identify emerging and promising practice in adult carers support. It focuses on support that takes a preventative approach by providing information and support to reduce or prevent the likelihood of carer crisis and breakdown, and improve the overall quality of carers’ lives. The review identifies key characteristics of effective preventative support services. It presents the review findings across the following key themes: identification and recognition of carers; the provision of information, advice and assistance; and supporting carers for a life outside of their caring role, through services such as respite and short breaks, emotional and employment support. Examples of services and interventions from Wales and England are included throughout. The final section looks at the available evidence on evaluating what works for carers.

Improving outcomes for carers via GP surgeries: implications for commissioners

OXFORD BROOKES UNIVERSITY. Institute of Public Care, CARERS BUCKS
2017

Reports on a pilot project, funded by the Chiltern Clinical Commissioning Group, which sought to help GPs identify previously unknown carers and improve carer experience and wellbeing outcomes. The pilot offered carers a free health and wellbeing check with a carer support worker and a social prescription to access services provided by Carers Bucks where appropriate. The health and wellbeing check used the 'Carers Star' covering seven outcome areas: health, the caring role, managing at home, time for yourself, how you feel, finances, and work. A total of 203 carers attended the carer clinics. Approximately a quarter of carers were caring for someone with dementia and a quarter were caring for someone with a physical disability. Analysis of comments received by carers attending the clinic identified three key themes: carers appreciated the clinics because they felt it was rare for anyone to ‘care’ for them; carers felt listened to; and received useful information about support they did not know existed. The paper maps learning from the project against the Institute of Public Care commissioning cycle and makes recommendations for commissioners.

Joining the dots: integrating practical support in mental healthcare settings in England

ISAKSEN Mette, WILLIAMS Richard
2017

This report provides an analysis of the advice needs of Citizens Advice clients in England who report having a mental health problem. It shows how recognising the links between people’s mental health and their wider practical problems is crucial both for preventing mental health problems from escalating and improving recovery rates. The report draws on the results of an analysis of client data, a survey of Citizens Advice advisors and a survey of 2,000 people across England. The analysis shows that a growing number of people who turn to Citizens Advice for advice report having mental health problems. In addition, clients with mental health problems tend to have more complex, urgent and multiple advice needs. The report uses Citizen Advice data to explore the advice needs of people with mental health problems across the areas of: finance, essential services, housing, employment, and benefits. It also provides evidence to show that the provision of practical advice and support alongside mental health services can improve patient wellbeing and outcomes and reduce demand on public services. Despite this, the research found that less than a third of people (32 per cent) nationally who access NHS services are referred to advice services, while twice as many (64 per cent) said this would be helpful. The report recommends that service providers should take action to ensure they are responding effectively to the needs of people with mental health problems and calls for government to fund a pilot for integrated practical support in primary mental healthcare settings.

Carers Leeds

Carers Leeds

Carers Leeds is an independent charity that gives support, advice and information to unpaid carers aged 16 and over, which in turn seeks to improve their overall physical, mental health and wellbeing. Established in 1996, a team of expert Carer Support Workers are dedicated to improving the lives of the 72,000 carers in Leeds. Carers Leeds seeks to address both national and local policy of people with care needs being supported in the community and to remain at home, when possible. In many instances, this support is provided by a family member or friend. For this to be sustainable, carers need to be able to look after their own health and social care needs which is why support services directly to support carers are vital.

The Lightbulb project: switched on to integration in Leicestershire

MORAN Alison
2017

A case study of the Lightbulb project, which brings together County and District Councils and other partners in Leicestershire to help people stay in their homes for as long as possible. The approach includes GPs and other health and care professionals and relies on early at home assessment process at key points of entry. This is delivered through a ‘hub and spoke’ model with an integrated Locality Lightbulb Team in each District Council area and covers: minor adaptations and equipment; DFGs; wider housing support needs (warmth, energy, home security); housing related health and wellbeing (AT, falls prevention); planning for the future (housing options); and housing related advice, information, and signposting. The Lightbulb service also includes a cost effective specialist Hospital Housing Enabler Team based in acute and mental health hospital settings across Leicestershire. The team work directly with patients and hospital staff to identify and resolve housing issues that are a potential barrier to hospital discharge and also provide low level support to assist with the move home from hospital to help prevent readmissions.

Results 1 - 10 of 24

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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