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Results for 'ageing'

Results 1 - 10 of 40

Falls Management Exercise implementation toolkit

NIHR CLAHRC. East Midlands, NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR HEALTH RESEARCH
2020

This toolkit provides a suite of resources that commissioners can use to plan, implement and monitor the Falls Management Exercise (FaME) programme. FaME is an evidence-based tailored strength and balance exercise programme that has been shown to reduce the rate of falls, increase physical activity levels and improve wellbeing. The toolkit is an output of the PhISICAL study (Physical activity Implementation Study In Community-dwelling AduLts). Sections of the toolkit cover: Building the case for implementing FaME which includes evidence summaries for commissioners, a costing tool, a business case and real life case studies from FaME class participants; Planning the implementation of FaME, which includes an implementation Gantt chart, a service specification, example delivery models, videos, logic model and key learning from the PhISICAL study; Implementing the programme, which includes sample promotional materials and templates; and Monitoring, evaluation and quality improvement, which provides quality assurance guidance and suggested monitoring tools and schedule.

Never too late: prevention in an ageing world

INTERNATIONAL LONGEVITY CENTRE UK
2020

This report explores how health care systems can better prevent ill health across people's lives, focusing on people interventions among those aged 50 and over. It presents analysis focussing on a small number of diseases where preventative interventions by healthcare systems could make a real difference to people’s health and wellbeing. These are cardiovascular, lung cancer, type 2 diabetes and HIV. It also considers the case of flu. It presents a snapshot of the potential burden and cost of these diseases, such as costs due to sick days, presenteeism and early retirement. It also provides brief overviews of preventative interventions, which have the potential to help people live healthier for longer. The analysis presented in the report shows that failure to invest in prevention will bring substantial social, health and economic costs. It argues that in order to follow through on commitments to prevention, governments need to improve access to preventative interventions to tackle growing health inequalities; encourage populations, professionals and policymakers to promote good health and prevent illness; and effectively utilise technology to deliver preventative interventions.

The effectiveness of community-based social innovations for healthy ageing in middle- and high-income countries: a systematic review

GHIGA Ioana, et al
2020

Objectives: Community-based social innovations (CBSIs) are one type of intervention that may help to address the complex needs of ageing populations globally. The aim of this research was to assess evidence for the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of CBSIs involving in such contexts. Methods: This study conducted a systematic review of CBSIs for healthy ageing in middle- and high-income countries, including any CBSI that aimed to empower people aged 50 and over by motivating them to take initiative for their own health and wellbeing. The protocol was registered with Prospero (CRD 42016051622). A comprehensive search was conducted in 15 academic databases and advanced search in Google. This study included published studies from 2000 onwards in any language. Exploratory meta-analysis was conducted for quantitative studies reporting similar outcomes, and qualitative studies were analysed using thematic analysis. Narrative synthesis was conducted. Searches yielded 13,262 unique hits, from which 44 papers met the inclusion criteria. Results: Most studies reported interventions having positive impacts on participants, such as reduced depression, though the majority of studies were classified as being at medium or high risk of bias. There was no evidence on costs or cost-effectiveness and very little reporting of outcomes at an organization or system level. CBSIs have the potential for positive impacts, but with nearly half of studies coming from high-income urban settings (particularly the United Kingdom and the United States of America), there is a lack of generalizability of these findings. Conclusions: This research highlights the need to improve reporting of CBSIs as complex interventions, and for improved conceptualization of these interventions to inform research and practice.

Prevention: developing a framework for conceptualising and evaluating outcomes of preventive services for older people

GODFREY Mary
2001

Focusing on older people, this article seeks a way to locate prevention within a theoretical model of successful ageing. This conceptualises ageing as involving adaptation to the changing balance between gains and losses over the life course. Successful ageing is perceived as the attainment of valued goals, the minimisation of losses and maximisation of gains through the linked processes of selective compensation and optimisation. Preventive services may be conceived as resources to be drawn upon to support compensatory strategies. Outcomes and effectiveness of services may be evaluated in terms of whether they facilitate/ allow older people to achieve valued goals. In developing and evaluating preventive services in social care the question is what contribution do specific services make in optimising gains and compensating for the losses that accompany ageing? This framework is explored in respect of two areas ripe for secondary prevention services and strategies - bereavement and instrumental support in the home.

Facilitators and barriers to autonomy: a systematic literature review for older adults with physical impairments, living in residential care facilities

van LOON Jolande, et al
2019

Autonomy is important in every stage of life. However, little is known about how autonomy is enhanced for older adults living in residential care facilities (RCFs). This leads to the research question: which facilitators and barriers to autonomy of older adults with physical impairments due to ageing and chronic health conditions living in RCFs are known? The results will be organised according to the framework of person-centred practice, because this is related to autonomy enhancement. To answer the research question, a systematic literature search and review was performed in the electronic databases CINAHL, PsycINFO, PubMed, Social Services Abstracts and Sociological Abstracts. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were derived from the research question. Selected articles were analysed and assessed on quality using the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool. Facilitators and barriers for autonomy were found and arranged in four themes: characteristics of residents, prerequisites of professional care-givers, care processes between resident and care-giver, and environment of care. The established facilitators and barriers are relational and dynamic. For a better understanding of the facilitators and barriers to autonomy for older adults with physical impairments living in RCFs, a description is based on the 35 included articles. Autonomy is a capacity to influence the environment and make decisions irrespective of having executional autonomy, to live the kind of life someone desires to live in the face of diminishing social, physical and/or cognitive resources and dependency, and it develops in relationships. The results provide an actual overview and lead to a better understanding of barriers and facilitators for the autonomy of older adults with physical impairments in RCFs. For both residents and care-givers, results offer possibilities to sustain and reinforce autonomy. Scientifically, the study creates new knowledge on factors that influence autonomy, which can be used to enhance autonomy.

Loneliness and the aging population: how businesses and governments can address a looming crisis

PALMARINI Nicola, et al
2017

This report explores the growing problem of loneliness in older people, current interventions, and ideas for future solutions. It draws on insights from interviews with a range of experts from six countries, including insight from medical professionals, social workers, academic researchers, technologists. The report focuses on why it is important for organisations understand loneliness and ageing, the triggers for loneliness, and why loneliness is so difficult to alleviate. It also looks at what is being done to alleviate loneliness in the ageing population today and potential future solutions. The report shows that for older people, loneliness is an emerging risk factor that has implications for personal, economic, and societal well-being. It identifies three areas for developing future solutions to address loneliness: detecting loneliness earlier and intervening earlier; helping people feel more engaged with others, and helping people rebuild social capital. It also outlines suggested actions for providers, business and employers. Short case studies of initiatives are included.

An evidence summary of health inequalities in older populations in coastal and rural areas: full report

PUBLIC HEALTH ENGLAND
2019

A rapid evidence review on the health inequalities experienced by older people in coastal and rural areas, supplemented with case studies. The review aimed to identify key determinants of health inequalities experienced by older populations in coastal and rural areas; looks at the strengths and assets of ageing populations in these areas; reviews the effectiveness health and social care system interventions and whole system approaches; and assess the opportunities for using digital technology. In addition to a rapid review of the national literature (covering the UK and Ireland), a search of international literature focusing on interventions to reduce health inequalities was also carried out. It is intended for local authorities, clinical commissioning groups and other health and care organisations to inform strategic planning, service design and commissioning, as well as the development of local community infrastructure. It also provides summary of key considerations in taking an asset-based approach in reducing inequalities and promoting productive healthy ageing in these areas. Two accompanying reports have also been published, an executive summary with main messages and an annex of included studies.

User requirements for technology to assist aging in place: qualitative study of older people and their informal support networks

ELERS Phoebe, et al
2018

BACKGROUND:Informal support is essential for enabling many older people to age in place. However, there is limited research examining the information needs of older adults' informal support networks and how these could be met through home monitoring and information and communication technologies. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to investigate how technologies that connect older adults to their informal and formal support networks could assist ageing in place and enhance older adults' health and well-being. METHODS: Semistructured interviews were conducted with 10 older adults and a total of 31 members of their self-identified informal support networks. They were asked questions about their information needs and how technology could support the older adults to age in place. The interviews were transcribed and thematically analysed. RESULTS: The analysis identified three overarching themes: (1) the social enablers theme, which outlined how timing, informal support networks, and safety concerns assist the older adults' uptake of technology, (2) the technology concerns theme, which outlined concerns about cost, usability, information security and privacy, and technology superseding face-to-face contact, and (3) the information desired theme, which outlined what information should be collected and transferred and who should make decisions about this. CONCLUSIONS: Older adults and their informal support networks may be receptive to technology that monitors older adults within the home if it enables ageing in place for longer. However, cost, privacy, security, and usability barriers would need to be considered and the system should be individualizable to older adults' changing needs. The user requirements identified from this study and described in this paper have informed the development of a technology that is currently being prototyped.

Working inclusively to make communities age-friendly: briefing

AMBITION FOR AGEING
2019

This briefing paper looks at how to design effective and inclusive ways of working to reach more older people in minority or marginalised communities. It argues that equality, diversity and inclusivity are central to understanding and reducing social isolation, and looks at key ways to embed inclusion in building age-friendly communities. These include: having a good understanding of communities themselves; designing genuinely inclusive opportunities, as well delivering targeted approaches; and working with an equalities mindset. The briefing draws on learning from research and reflection by the Ambition for Ageing Equalities Board. This briefing will be of interest to those working to tackle loneliness and social isolation of older people from marginalised communities, and those concerned that community and neighbourhood-level work reaches people in marginalised communities.

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company

Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company, grew out of a commission in 2010-11, in the run up for the Cultural Olympiad 2012, to develop a dance piece with a group of older women. Following the event, a group of women wanted to continue the dance group so Moving Memory was formed. Skipping forward a few years, along with the performance pieces that Moving Memory creates for public events, they also deliver workshops, bespoke participatory projects and training. Moving Memory's vision is for a society where older people live longer, healthier and more fulfilling lives because they participate in artistic, creative and physical activities. The work they produce – and the way they produce it – aims to challenge perceived notions of age and ageing, by asking audiences and participants to look beyond their assumptions and changing attitudes towards older people.

Results 1 - 10 of 40

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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