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Results for 'art therapy'

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Evidence summary for policy: the role of arts in improving health & wellbeing: report to the Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport

FANCOURT Daisy, WARRAN Katey, AUGHTERSON Henry
2020

This report synthesised the findings from over 3,500 studies on the role of the arts in the prevention of ill health, promotion of health, and management and treatment of illness across the lifespan. The reviewed evidence included study designs such as randomized controlled studies, nationally-representative longitudinal cohort studies, communitywide ethnographies, cross-sectional surveys, laboratory experiments, and case studies. The review focuses on how arts engagement can impact on 1) social outcomes, 2) youth development and 3) the prevention of mental and physical illness. It also considers how social prescribing programmes that have used arts interventions can impact on the above three outcomes. The evidence summary assesses the type and quality of evidence available for each outcome. The findings show strong evidence for the following outcomes, suggesting that this evidence can be trusted to guide policy: the use of music to support infant social development; the use of book reading to support child social development; the use of music or reading for speech and language development amongst infants and children; the use of the arts to support aspects of social cohesion; the use of the arts to improve wellbeing (i.e. positive psychological factors) in adults; and the use of the arts to reduce physical decline in older age. In relation to the use of social prescribing (SP), the evidence is promising for wellbeing and social cohesion but weak for physical health and social inequalities, and non-existent for social development, the prevention of mental illness, and cognition. Nevertheless, economic evaluations suggest there may be benefits including returns on investment and social returns on investment from implementing arts-based SP.

The After Party evaluation report on a socially distanced care home project: March – July 2020

MAGIC ME
2020

This evaluation summarises outcomes for those involved in The After Party project, including care home residents and staff, volunteers, artists and staff from the care providers; and provides a short overview of Magic Me’s Cocktail in Care Homes (CICH) project, with a focus on the context of how The After Party began. The study also includes learning and suggestions for future work, in light of outcomes and learning from The After Party. For over 10 years Magic Me trained volunteers who were seeking connections with their local communities to come into their local care homes and have a party with residents. The After Party was developed as a way of keeping up the links with these key CICH sites during the pandemic, in place of the planned last few parties to mark the end of the CICH programme. Each month, After Party care partners received newsletters from Magic Me, which included artist actions and activities, alongside personalised messages from CICH Volunteers. After Party ‘care packages’ were sent via post by the artists, which included creative activities and resources, physical items, i.e. letters, artworks and/ or physical representations of artworks produced by volunteers and the wider public who have taken part in the creative activities throughout the month. They are physical mementos for residents, staff and the home/scheme. The evaluation found that Magic Me provided very easy to use care packages which met the needs of residents, were helpful to care staff, motivated volunteers and generated a great deal of happiness and interaction at a very difficult time. Benefits were felt by all involved. Although it was impossible to create the same sense of connection as when meeting face to face, it seems that The After Party managed to capture some of the energy and colour of the CICH parties and this was transferred into the online project.

Dementia-friendly Brent: a model of community

TILKI Mary
2018

Report on the London borough of Brent's dynamic social movement helping to make the borough dementia friendly. Community Action on Dementia Brent (CADBrent) is a dynamic social movement that aims to make the London borough dementia friendly, accessible and inclusive of black and minority ethnic (BME) communities. Much has been achieved since the movement began five years ago. Some of the schemes discussed in the article include: Dementia peer support project; dementia friendly Mapesbury; The De-Cafe - memory cafe; Whole street of support; The Shed and Parnerships in Innovative Education.

The arts as a medium for care and self-care in dementia: arguments and evidence

SCHNEIDER Justine
2018

The growing prevalence of dementia, combined with an absence of effective pharmacological treatments, highlights the potential of psychosocial interventions to alleviate the effects of dementia and enhance quality of life. With reference to a manifesto from the researcher network Interdem, this paper shows how arts activities correspond to its definition of psycho-social care. It presents key dimensions that help to define different arts activities in this context, and illustrates the arts with reference to three major approaches that can be viewed online; visual art, music and dance. It goes on to discuss the features of each of these arts activities, and to present relevant evidence from systematic reviews on the arts in dementia in general. Developing the analysis into a template for differentiating arts interventions in dementia, the paper goes on to discuss implications for future research and for the uptake of the arts by people with dementia as a means to self-care.

Social prescribing: a review of the evidence

KINSELLA Sarah
2016

A brief review of the literature on social prescribing. Social prescribing is a way of linking primary care patients with psycho-social issues, with sources of appropriate, non-medical support in the community. Suitable referrals to social prescribing initiatives are vulnerable and at risk groups such as: people with mild to moderate depression and anxiety; low income single parents; recently bereaved older people; people with long term conditions and frequent attendees in primary and secondary care. The review highlights that prescribed activities have typically included arts and creative activities, physical activity, learning and volunteering opportunities and courses, self-care and support with practical issues such as benefits, housing, debt and employment. The evidence on the impact of social prescribing is currently limited and inconsistent. While some initiatives have shown improved outcomes for patients and potential for cost-savings (in the longer term), few have been subject to economic analysis or the kind of rigorous evaluation which would inform commissioners. The report recommends that any new, local social prescribing initiatives should aim to add to the current evidence base and conduct transparent and thorough.

Arts for health and wellbeing: an evaluation framework

DAYKIN Norma, JOSS Tim
2016

Guidance on appropriate ways of documenting the impacts of arts for health and wellbeing, whether through small scale project evaluations or large scale research studies. The document suggests a standard framework for reporting of project activities that will strengthen understanding of what works in specific contexts and enable realistic assessment and appropriate comparisons to be made between programmes. Part one provides background discussion to help make sense of the framework and includes a discussion of evaluation principles and practice, encompassing project planning, the role of advocacy and the importance of consultation and stakeholder involvement. In part two the different types of evaluation are outlined, with suggested tools for arts for health and wellbeing evaluation, including outcomes measurement. Part three captures the key components of project delivery, including the nature of the intervention, the populations engaged, the settings where the project takes place, the resources needed to support it, procedures for quality assurance, and the outcomes that the project is designed to achieve. Evaluation details are also sets out to encourage clear identification of important aspects such as rationale, evaluation questions, evaluation design, sampling, data collection and analysis, process evaluation, ethics and consent, reporting and dissemination, evaluation management and the resources needed to undertake evaluation.

Tackling loneliness in older age: the role of the arts

CUTLER David
2012

This report looks at the scale and impact of loneliness among older people and argues that the arts are a powerful tool to tackle the problem. It suggests that older people need a broad range of opportunities and activities to help them maintain healthy social relationships. These can include care and befriending support, but just as important are opportunities that connect them to their communities, such as faith, learning, fitness, leisure and cultural activities. The arts are an effective way to tackle loneliness but can be overlooked by older people’s services. The report provides some practical actions for this activity to be increased and a list of resources. It contains an appended series of ten case studies drawn from some of the arts organisations currently funded by the Baring Foundation. These illustrate some of the many ways in which the arts can make a difference: in rural locations or in the inner city, in a residential care home, a community or an arts venue, through reinventing the tradition of the tea dance for the 21st century or in a major new festival.

Results 1 - 7 of 7

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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