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Results for 'assessment'

Results 1 - 9 of 9

The UTOPIA project: using telecare for older people in adult social care. The findings of a 2016-17 national survey of local authority telecare provision for older people in England

WOOLHAM John, et al
2018

This report describes how electronic assistive technology and telecare are used by local authorities in England to support older people. It is based on an online survey of local authority telecare managers to identify local authority’s aims when offering telecare to older people, the methods they use to assess whether their objectives are achieved, and how telecare is operationalised and delivered. It also aimed to explore why the findings of the earlier the Whole System Demonstrator project - which found no evidence that telecare improved outcomes - have been overlooked by local authorities and policy makers, and whether there is other evidence that could account for WSD findings. The survey results found a third of local authorities used research evidence to inform telecare services and half were also aware of the Whole System Demonstrator. It also found that telecare is used in most local authorities to save money. Although there was some evidence of monitoring, there was no evidence of local authorities adopting agreed standards. The final section of the report provides suggestions for improving telecare service practice. They include the areas of using telecare as a substitute for social care; expanding the focus on telecare beyond risk management, safety and cost reduction; the impact of telecare on family members, carrying out effective assessments, and training.

Comprehensive care: older people living with frailty in hospitals

NIHR DISSEMINATION CENTRE
2017

This review looks at the concept of 'frailty' in older people and what can be done to raise awareness amongst hospital staff, so that they can better identify and manage the needs of this ‘frail’ older people. It features 53 completed and ongoing studies funded by the National Institute of Health Research. The review covers four key aspects of caring for older people living with frailty in hospital: assessment; identifying and managing symptoms associated with frailty in hospital; discharge planning; and caring environments which consider the context in which inpatient diagnosis and treatment is delivered. The review highlights promising evaluations of workplace training and interventions. It also identifies a number of tools, such as the Frailty Index, that can help hospital staff to identify the severity of needs and help to provide targeted support. It also finds good evidence that the Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA) is a reliable way of diagnosing and meeting the needs of older people with input from multi-disciplinary teams. It also identifies areas where more research is needed, which include: maintaining activities of daily living for people admitted to hospital; and the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of different models of delivering care. The review also includes a series of questions that hospital boards, staff and families can ask about the care of older people with frailty in hospitals. Summaries of the 53 studies are also included.

'Three Conversation Model' Transforming Lives Cambridgeshire County Council Adults Learning Disabilities Team

Cambridgeshire County Council

East Cambridgeshire Learning Disability Partnership is a multi disciplinary team providing social care and specialist health input to adults with learning disabilities living in the community. In 2014, Cambridgeshire County Council started its Transforming Lives programme to meet new requirements arising from the Care Act, and as part of this programme the East Cambridgeshire Learning Disability Partnership team began to pilot the Three Conversation Model (pioneered by Partners for Change) in October of that year. The model is now well established in the team and has been rolled out across the council.

Assessing social care market and provider sustainability: part A: a guide for local authorities

CORDIS BRIGHT
2015

The Care Act 2014 introduces a regime to oversee the financial stability of the hardest-to-replace care providers, and sets out measures to ensure people’s care is not interrupted if any social care or support providers fail. This guidance aims to help local authorities to fulfil their responsibilities in the event of provider failure by: helping them identify whether the failure of a provider will leave people at risk of being without a means of having their care and support needs met; where there is a risk, identifying those providers who are most important to meeting those needs, and; where the critical or hardest to replace providers are not within the Care Quality Commission Market Oversight Regime, assessing and taking action to reduce the risk of failure or the impact of a failure should one occur. The document begins looking at care markets and providers, introducing a suggested approach to categorising and segmenting care markets, as well as outlining the main reasons for provider failure. It then considers how to identify indicators of market sustainability and how to monitor hard-to-replace providers.

Assessing social care market and provider sustainability: part B: toolkit

CORDIS BRIGHT
2015

Provides a framework to help local authorities implement a test of care market sustainability, and offers insights about when a provider requires further monitoring. Many local authorities have developed highly effective systems for gathering local market intelligence in relation to the part of the market with which they contract for services. This intelligence may be gathered both formally and informally and involve a broad range of approaches. This toolkit is designed to complement such approaches by providing a clear structure for local authorities to consider the totality of the local market, only a proportion of which they will directly contract with. There are five phases to the application of the toolkit: determining local market segmentation; evaluation of external indicators; evaluation of sub market composition indicators; forming a judgement on sustainability and deciding which ‘hard to replace’ providers to monitor; and understanding and monitoring the sustainability of ’hard to replace’ providers.

Care Act: assessment and eligibility: strengths-based approaches

SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
2015

This guide summarises the process and the key elements to consider in relation to using a strengths-based approach. Sections provide information on what a strength-based approach is; the information practitioners need to carry out an assessment; using strength-based mapping; and key factors that make a good assessment. It also looks at how local authorities can extend the use of the strengths-based approach from assessments to meeting needs and provides a summary of core local authority duties in relation to conducting a strengths-based approach. It should be read in conjunction with the Care and Support (Assessment) Regulations 2014 and Chapter 6 of the 'Care and support statutory guidance', published by the Department of Health.

Fit for frailty: consensus best practice guidance for the care of older people living with frailty in community and outpatient settings

TURNER Gillian
2014

The first of a two-part guidance on the recognition and management of older patients with frailty in community and outpatient settings. This guide has been produced in association with the Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP) and Age UK and aims to be an invaluable tool for social workers, ambulance crews, carers, GPs, nurses and others working with older people in the community. The guidance will help them to recognise the condition of frailty and to increase understanding of the strategies available for managing it. In the guidelines, the British Geriatrics Society (BGS) calls for all those working with older people to be aware of, and assess for frailty. It dispels the myth that all older people are frail and that frailty is an inevitable part of age. It also highlights the fact that frailty is not static. Like other long term conditions it can fluctuate in severity.

Care Act 2014: a strengths-based approach

SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
2015

One of the aims of the Care Act 2014 is to promote people's wellbeing and independence. By using a strengths-based approach to the assessment process, people can be supported to understand their needs, realise what they can do, and how to best use their skills and networks, to achieve their outcomes. This film looks at what is meant by a strengths-based approach and how practitioners through the assessment process can enable people to be at the centre of their own care and support needs. [This film is no longer available].

An introduction to economic evaluation in occupational therapy: cost-effectiveness of pre-discharge home visits after stroke (HOVIS)

SAMPSON Christopher, et al
2014

Introduction: Occupational therapy interventions, such as home visits, have been identified as being resource-intensive, but cost-effectiveness analyses are rarely, if ever, carried out. The authors sought to estimate the cost-effectiveness of occupational therapy home visits after stroke, as part of a feasibility study, and to demonstrate the value and methods of economic evaluation. Method: The authors completed a cost-effectiveness analysis of pre-discharge occupational therapy home visits after stroke compared with a hospital-based interview, carried out alongside a feasibility randomised controlled trial. Their primary outcome was quality-adjusted life years. Full cost and outcome data were available for 65 trial participants. Findings: The mean total cost of a home visit was found to be £183, compared with £75 for a hospital interview. Home visits are shown to be slightly more effective, resulting in a cost per quality-adjusted life year of just over £20,000. Conclusion: The author's analysis is the only economic evaluation of this intervention to date. Home visits are shown to be more expensive and more effective than a hospital-based interview, but the results are subject to a high level of uncertainty and should be treated as such. Further economic evaluations in this field are encouraged.

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