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Results for 'asset based approach'

Results 1 - 10 of 39

Local Area Coordination (IOW) evaluation report: “What is it about Local Area Coordination that makes it work for end users, under what circumstances, how and why?”

MASON James, HARRIS Kevin, RYAN Louise
2019

This evaluation report draws upon the findings of a realist evaluation of the LAC on the Isle of Wight (IOW) to establish how and why the programme worked for people and communities across three demographical areas. As a sample this focused on the first three Local Area Coordinators to mobilise LAC representative of Ryde, Shanklin and Freshwater. The methods selected for this study were made up of Q-method (Watts and Stenner, 2012) and realist interviews. Q-method focuses on subjective viewpoints of its participants asking them to decide what is meaningful and what does (and what does not) have value and significance from their perspective. Q-Method involves developing a set of statements representing a set of viewpoints of certain individuals about an issue or programme. In this case a set of statements about LAC on the IOW were produced and ranked in line with most important to most un-important by end users. These rankings were then analysed to produce holistic narratives illustrating shared viewpoints around how and why LAC worked. This was also supported by realist interviews which sought to further investigate the key mechanisms at play within LAC on the IOW. The findings of the evaluation established that listening, trust and time were consistent across the three Local Area Coordinators sampled in the evaluation. The coordinator also needs to continue to build on relationships with the differing referral groups due to the variety of methods used to make individuals aware of Local Area Coordination. However, it was also quite clear that LAC worked for different end users in different ways with the Q study creating three different subgroups of end users experiencing LAC: subgroup 1 – “I know you are there and that means a lot, but I’m building my own social networks”; subgroup 2 – “Thank you for your support, I’ve come a long way”; subgroup 3 – “I’m moving down the path, but I still need your personalised support”. The findings demonstrate that LAC works for different people in different ways. Within the spirit of the realist approach to the evaluation the three subgroup holistic narratives provide an insight into what works for whom in what circumstances and why.

Rolling out social prescribing: understanding the experience of the voluntary, community and social enterprise sector

COLE Aimie, JONES Dan, JOPLING Kate
2020

This report sets out the findings of research to explore the perspectives and experiences of the voluntary, community and social enterprise (VCSE) sector in relation to the NHS rollout of social prescribing. The research heard from over 300 people through a series of interviews, workshops and online engagements between December 2019 and June 2020. NHS England has made a significant commitment to ensure that social prescribing is available across the country, including the recruitment of over 1,000 specialist link workers during 2020/21. The study explored key components of the programme and its implications, including: the new social prescribing link workers; measurement; funding; inequality; and coordination, collaboration and partnership. The findings indicate that the VCSE sector is supportive of social prescribing and keen to work constructively with the health system. However, in many places the pace of the rollout has had a destabilising effect by cutting across existing schemes, or failing to build on and invest in the work already done by the sector. Respondents were committed to measurement and using performance data for management and improvement but there are concerns about the use of appropriate measures, which capture the social as well as clinical outcomes of social prescribing. Funding was by far the biggest concern for all those who took part, and specifically in relation to funding for services and activities provided by the VCSE sector. In addition, without appropriate investment, social prescribing could exacerbate inequality in a range of ways – generalist link workers may lack the skills or resources to engage effectively with excluded individuals and communities while poorer communities tend to have lower levels of formal VCSE activity. The findings emphasise that effective social prescribing depends on relationships, both at individual and organisational level – VCSE experiences of the rollout have been most positive in places where relationships were already established.

Evaluation of Leicestershire Local Area Coordination: final report

M·E·L RESEARCH
2020

This evaluation of Leicestershire Local Area Coordination (LAC) has comprised both formative (process) and summative (outcome) elements. LAC is a complex community-based intervention, delivered in 10 very different local areas in four of the County’s Districts, operationally delivered by 8 Coordinators with varied backgrounds and different working styles. It is designed to have an impact on three levels: individual, community, and health and social care integration. The evaluation finds that LAC has been effective in achieving its ‘founding’ aims and strategic objectives for individuals (a strong focus on assets-based approaches and a community model of delivery, aimed at ‘upstream prevention’ working with vulnerable residents at risk of crisis). LAC has been moderately effective in achieving its aims and objectives around HSC integration but has been less effective in delivering its’ community-based objectives. The SROI findings provide positive evidence of measurable outcomes for LAC, demonstrating positive SROI ratio of £4.10 in accumulated benefit for every £1 spent. It has been more challenging to make LAC successful (and therefore LAC is likely to have less impact for residents) in areas with less community infrastructure; and as LAC is not a prescriptive service, the impact of LAC for some beneficiaries may be lessened as they may not be ready to take the steps to help them move forward. The most successful elements of LAC have comprised: the relationships between coordinators, and beneficiaries and local partners – trust, flexibility and effective networking; coordinator knowledge of local assets and ability to match this with beneficiary support needs; coordinators being located within the communities they work; the lack of specific agenda for coordinators making them less threatening; and the personal skills and commitment of the coordinator team.

Social prescribing

EATON Matthew
2020

This paper details the development of social prescribing policies in England and provides an overview of schemes in the devolved nations. Social prescribing is a means for GPs and other healthcare professionals to refer patients via a link worker to non-clinical services in the local community. Link workers help people to understand the underlying issues affecting their health and wellbeing and work with them to co-produce a personalised care and support plan. People can take up a range of activities and services including the arts, nature-based activities, physical activity classes and counselling. This briefing examines the background and path to social prescribing, looking at key initiatives and reports; Government policy; the benefits of social prescribing; and social prescribing in the devolved nations.

Simply the best? Making Leeds the best city to grow old in

MELANIE HENWOOD ASSOCIATES
2020

Research exploring the local strategic policy context for meeting the care and health need of older people in Leeds, and how the Leeds Neighbourhood Networks understand and contribute to the agenda. The Leeds Neighbourhood Network (LNN), comprised of 37 locally led ‘schemes’ operated by a number of voluntary sector organisations, provides preventative support to older people in order to enable them to continue living independently and participate in their communities. They assist with a range of services and activities that promote the independence, health and wellbeing of older people throughout Leeds. This paper outlines the number of opportunities and challenges the LNNs face within the strategic policy context, and looks at the potential for Leeds to share more widely the benefits of its approach and experience. It describes how the LNNs are firmly rooted in their local neighbourhoods and understand the needs and preferences of local citizens they are in touch with and suggests there is an opportunity for them to develop a more outward looking style and connect people to a much wider range of community assets and resources. Furthermore, the LNNs could be more closely involved in supporting self-management for people with long-term conditions, and for health practitioners to benefit from being able to access groups of people needing support with diabetes, or COPD, or similar chronic conditions. Among the challenges, the paper cites the extremely diverse nature of LNNs, the risk that other third sector organisations perceive their own contribution to be less valued, the need to constantly adjust and tailor the ‘offer’ to reflect the changing needs of the older population, the lack of synergy between the LNNs and partners, the difficulties in implementing and evidencing strengths and asset-based approaches and the uncertainty about future funding and the direction of government policy.

Prevention in social care: where are we now?

WAVEHILL SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC RESEARCH, SKILLS FOR CARE
2019

This report draws together the main findings from a research study, which aimed to provide an overview of the published and unpublished literature relating to prevention in social care; consult with stakeholders to understand more about engagement with the prevention agenda; and identify examples of practice in England to learn more about how prevention is working in social care. The literature identified five key approaches to prevention: advice and guidance; physical activity promotion; social prescribing; reablement; and asset-based approaches. For each approach, the report provides a brief outline and examples of good practice. The report also looks at the interplay between prevention and the integration agenda, focusing on new care models, wellbeing teams, and new and emerging job roles; explores how to develop capacity in social care, through learning and development resources, use of technology, and commissioning and contracting; and examines the critical factors to effectively implement and embed prevention in practice.

CLS Evidence and Learning Briefings 2020. Paper 1: programme findings and lessons about what makes Community Led Support work well for people and places across the UK

BROWN Helen, et al
2020

One of six briefings sharing evaluation findings and lessons from a project to explore the impacts of community led support across the UK, a place-based approach to achieving change in health and social care services, through working closely with local communities and partners in the voluntary, community, business and public sectors. The briefing highlights learning in relation to: local approaches to implementation; effective local leadership; the people community led support is reaching; and whether community led support deliver better outcomes for the same or less resource; and the factors that help to sustain it. The paper highlights five key messages, which include: the importance of understanding local context and knowing what works in each place, who the local players are and how best to work with them; and having the right kind of leadership, at all levels and across the system.

Loneliness, social isolation and COVID-19: practical advice

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION, ASSOCIATION OF DIRECTORS OF PUBLIC HEALTH
2020

This briefing provides advice for Directors of Public Health and those leading the response to loneliness and social isolation issues arising from the COVID-19 pandemic. The advice highlights the importance in intervening early to tackle loneliness and social isolation to prevent more costly health and care needs from developing, as well as helping community resilience and recovery. This can only be done at the local level through partnerships, with councils playing a role, as they own most of the assets where community action could or should take place, such as parks, libraries and schools. A table summarises the main risk factors of loneliness and social isolation, including those specific to COVID-19. It then briefly sets out councils’ role in working with partners and using community assets to address and help prevent loneliness and social isolation; looks at the steps councils were taking prior to the pandemic; and the changes that may be needed as a result of COVID-19 and opportunities to embed positive changes, such as greater awareness about the impact of personal behaviours on mental wellbeing.

CLS Evidence and Learning Briefings 2020. Paper 3: understanding the nature of change in delivering Community Led Support

CARRIER Jane
2020

One of six briefings to share evaluation findings and lessons from a project to explore the impacts of community led support across the UK. Community led support is a place-based approach to achieving change in health and social care services, through working closely with local communities and partners in the voluntary, community, business and public sectors. The paper draws on analysis of the second round of evaluation across sites who joined the programme between 2014-15 and 2018-19. It highlights ten priority actions to help to achieve, implement and sustain community led support. Key factors for success include knowing what works and doesn’t work in each place, what other related developments are already in place (such as Local Area Coordination, social prescribers and wellbeing coordinators), who the local players are right across the system (including in the community) and how best to work respectfully alongside them.

CLS Evidence and Learning Briefings 2020. Paper 4: Community Led Support: learning from stories of change

GIRLING Fran
2020

One of six briefings to share findings and lessons from a project to explore the impacts of community led support across the UK. Community led support is a place-based approach to achieving change in health and social care services, through working closely with local communities and partners in the voluntary, community, business and public sectors. This paper shares a sample of change stories from the perspective of people experiencing Community Led Support in a sample of places across the UK. The stories provide practical examples of how people have engaged with community led support and provide insight on what works and how this has been achieved. In the majority of change stories analysed, Community Led Support approach is enabling people to achieve their goals and improve their resilience and wellbeing. In many cases, this support has resulted in people feeling less socially isolated and more connected with their community, which in turn has increased their confidence and resilience.

Results 1 - 10 of 39

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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