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Results for 'asset based approach'

Results 1 - 10 of 24

Innovations in community-centred support

THINK LOCAL ACT PERSONAL
2019

An online directory which provides examples of innovative and community-centred models of support that improve people's wellbeing. The directory will help commissioners and providers to find out about community-centred approaches that are having a positive impact on people's lives. It covers examples in the following areas: helping people stay well and connected with others; supporting people to contribute; supporting people to live well at home; new models of care and support with accommodation; and regaining independence. The examples are all person-centred, work with people’s strengths; and are about supporting people to have a life and not a service.

Resilience: understanding the interdependence between individuals and communities

DAVIES Alisha R., et al
2019

Drawing on the results of a literature review, this report brings together evidence on individual and community resilience, and the interdependence between the two. It draws on examples of programmes to strengthen resilience across the life course and in communities, and looks at approaches to measuring change in resilience. The report highlights how people’s sense of wellbeing, how well they cope emotionally, and how they engage socially are the key factors for resilience, which in turn contribute to wider community resilience. Resilient communities can draw on the assets within people, place and wider economic factors. It also finds that resilience is not fixed but changes at different points in peoples' lives. The report highlights a range of activities that improve community and individual resilience, including: encouraging good relationships and connections with others; establishing a healthy family environment and early positive parent-child relationships; promoting good health and mental wellbeing in adulthood, including developing positive relationships and social capital through engaging with the community; and enhancing the resilience of older people though building positive relationships, strengthening social connections and meaningful engagement, alongside enhancing autonomy and independence. It concludes with a summary of the key messages.

Local Area Coordination: summative evaluation

LUNT Neil, BAINBRIDGE Laura
2019

The results from the third phase of an evaluation of a Local Area Coordination approach developed in York, which involved the introduction of three Local Area Coordinators. The evaluation aimed to identify early outcomes at the level of individuals, families, community and system (including project objectives and cost effectiveness). It also aimed to identify emerging insights and potential future opportunities for data collection, and longitudinal approaches to Local Area Coordination outcomes over a longer timeframe. Methods used included analysis of performance data, review of documentation and interviews with Local Area Coordinators, Programme Managers and community organisations. The findings show that Local Area Coordination is operating as intended, and is providing support to people not previously known to services. People also welcome long-term focus of Local Area Coordinator work. It also identified examples of real changes as a consequence of Local Area Support, including preventative interventions and helping families navigate complex and challenging circumstances.

People doing it for themselves

COMMUNITY CATALYSTS
2019

Shares key findings and learning from the first phase of a project to explore the motivations and achievements of ‘people doing it for themselves’. The project focuses on older or disabled people who need care and support, and have decided to establish something new or lead local change. The project worked with over 20 individuals and groups to find out what helped them do it for themselves, the challenges the faced, and the impact their activity is having on themselves and their communities. The project also engaged with 10 decision makers and commissioners to identify good practice and understand how local authorities and others can be supported to encourage people in their area to do it for themselves. The project found that when people do it for themselves it can have a positive impact on their lives, the lives of those around them and their community, and also on local and national policy and practice. The report shows found that personal qualities combined with aspiration and inspiration are key motivators for people. Potential barriers to action can include effective support, funding or other resources, equipment, transport and accessibility. It concludes by highlighting a number of factors that can encourage more people to ‘do it for themselves’. The detailed stories of the 20 people and groups involved in the project can be read in an accompanying appendix.

An evidence summary of health inequalities in older populations in coastal and rural areas: full report

PUBLIC HEALTH ENGLAND
2019

A rapid evidence review on the health inequalities experienced by older people in coastal and rural areas, supplemented with case studies. The review aimed to identify key determinants of health inequalities experienced by older populations in coastal and rural areas; looks at the strengths and assets of ageing populations in these areas; reviews the effectiveness health and social care system interventions and whole system approaches; and assess the opportunities for using digital technology. In addition to a rapid review of the national literature (covering the UK and Ireland), a search of international literature focusing on interventions to reduce health inequalities was also carried out. It is intended for local authorities, clinical commissioning groups and other health and care organisations to inform strategic planning, service design and commissioning, as well as the development of local community infrastructure. It also provides summary of key considerations in taking an asset-based approach in reducing inequalities and promoting productive healthy ageing in these areas. Two accompanying reports have also been published, an executive summary with main messages and an annex of included studies.

An evaluation of Rainbow Services community builder project: the Senior Safe and Social Programme

HAINES Sarah
2018

An evaluation of the Senior Safe and Social Project in Harlow, a project to reduce loneliness and social isolation in older people. The evaluation aims to provide an insight into why the model is working well, whether it could be applied to other demographics, how the approach compares with similar models, and the sustainability of the project. The project, based on an Asset Based Community Development (ABCD) model, provides weekly clubs and events in local communities, which are directed by older people themselves. The evaluation identified key factors identified that helped the model work. These included that social groups are design designed around the participants and give them control over what they do. Volunteers’ involvement in the project represents a reciprocal exchange, giving the volunteer the opportunity to socialise and sense of usefulness and connection in the local community. The evaluation suggests that the model could be applied to other locations and other age groups, such as young mothers and ‘empty nesters’. The report includes suggestions for the future development of the project.

It’s time for Local Area Coordination

COMMUNITY CATALYSTS
2019

The report provides information on the Local Area Coordination and highlights the positive impact it has had on communities in England and Wales. Drawing on the experience of the 11 current members of the Local Area Coordination Network, who are local authorities or health services, the report shares stories to show how the model can: make local communities better places to live; improve the health and wellbeing of local people; integrate health and social care; co-produce change with local people; reform the front door to services; and create social value and reduce costs.

What makes an age-friendly neighbourhood: briefing

AMBITION FOR AGEING
2018

Drawing on the findings from the Ambition for Ageing programme, this briefing explores what older people across Greater Manchester feel makes an age-friendly neighbourhood. Their responses covered six main themes that interlink to make an age-friendly neighbourhood: Community, integration and belonging; Meeting and participation opportunities; Community resources and spaces; Accessibility, transport and facilities; Feelings of safety and security; and Information and Communication. The Ambition of Ageing programme aimed to find out what works in reducing social isolation by taking an asset-based approach and creating age-friendly communities.

How we build age-friendly neighbourhoods: briefing

AMBITION FOR AGEING
2018

Drawing on the findings from the Ambition for Ageing programme in Manchester, this briefing offers practical guidance for practitioners on how to work with older people to build age-friendly communities using an asset-based approach. It highlights age-friendly activities taking place across Greater Manchester and explores successes and challenges encountered by the Ambition for Ageing programme. The briefing highlights the importance of events and activities being designed and led by older people, for activities to be inclusive and reflect the diversity of the population, the benefits of inter-generational work, and the need to re-thinking the use of community spaces.

The four essential elements of an asset-based community development process

McKNIGHT John, RUSSELL Cormac
2018

This paper provides an overview of Asset-Based Community Development (ABCD) and discusses the four essential elements of the (ABCD) process that make it distinct from other approaches. The paper describes these as: resources - the assets that communities create but services so often ignore, such as individual resident contributions, local groups and the natural and built environment; methods - the assumption that communities can and should drive change themselves; functions - the essential functions that communities can perform for themselves, such as enabling health, shaping local economies, and co-recreating; and evaluation - the questions that can be used to evaluate an ABCD process and assess the effectiveness of community life.

Results 1 - 10 of 24

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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