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Results for 'attitudes'

Results 1 - 6 of 6

Perceptions of older people in Ireland and Australia about the use of technology to address falls prevention

MACKENZIE Lynette, CLIFFORD Amanda
2020

Falls are common events with serious consequences for older people. With an ageing population and increasing health-care costs, information and communication technologies (ICT) will have a potential role in future health-care delivery. However, research on technology acceptance in health care for older people is limited and its application to falls prevention is unknown. The aims of this study were to explore and describe the perceptions of community-dwelling Australian and Irish older people about their current use of technology, and the potential use of technology for falls prevention. Qualitative data were collected from three focus groups conducted in and around Limerick in Ireland, and three in the Sydney area, Australia. A total of 35 older people participated. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Four themes emerged from the data: (a) perceptions of vulnerability to falls, (b) preferences for exercise interventions, (c) participation in and ownership of technology, and (d) perceptions about applications of technology for falls prevention. As the use of technology is an instrumental activity of daily living, health professionals need to assess the capacity of older people to adopt these technologies, and provide falls prevention interventions to accommodate the technology skills of older people. Some participants were reluctant to embrace technology and barriers to the effective use of technology to assist in preventing falls may conflict with future health service trends.

Prevention: developing a framework for conceptualising and evaluating outcomes of preventive services for older people

GODFREY Mary
2001

Focusing on older people, this article seeks a way to locate prevention within a theoretical model of successful ageing. This conceptualises ageing as involving adaptation to the changing balance between gains and losses over the life course. Successful ageing is perceived as the attainment of valued goals, the minimisation of losses and maximisation of gains through the linked processes of selective compensation and optimisation. Preventive services may be conceived as resources to be drawn upon to support compensatory strategies. Outcomes and effectiveness of services may be evaluated in terms of whether they facilitate/ allow older people to achieve valued goals. In developing and evaluating preventive services in social care the question is what contribution do specific services make in optimising gains and compensating for the losses that accompany ageing? This framework is explored in respect of two areas ripe for secondary prevention services and strategies - bereavement and instrumental support in the home.

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company

Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company, grew out of a commission in 2010-11, in the run up for the Cultural Olympiad 2012, to develop a dance piece with a group of older women. Following the event, a group of women wanted to continue the dance group so Moving Memory was formed. Skipping forward a few years, along with the performance pieces that Moving Memory creates for public events, they also deliver workshops, bespoke participatory projects and training. Moving Memory's vision is for a society where older people live longer, healthier and more fulfilling lives because they participate in artistic, creative and physical activities. The work they produce – and the way they produce it – aims to challenge perceived notions of age and ageing, by asking audiences and participants to look beyond their assumptions and changing attitudes towards older people.

What do older people experiencing loneliness think about primary care or community based interventions to reduce loneliness? A qualitative study in England

KHARICHA Kalpa, et al
2017

Twenty-eight community dwelling people, aged 65 and over who reported being ‘lonely much of the time’ or identified as lonely from the de Jong Gierveld six-item loneliness scale in a larger study, participated in in-depth interviews, between June 2013 and May 2014. Views and experiences on seeking support from primary care and community based one-to-one and group based activities, including social and shared interest groups, were explored. Interviews were recorded and transcribed. Thematic analysis was conducted by a multidisciplinary team, including older people. Using two different measures of loneliness enabled a spectrum of loneliness experience to be explored. Two-thirds of the participants were the ‘younger old’ and all were able to leave their homes independently. Older people with characteristics of loneliness were generally knowledgeable about local social and community resources but, for the majority, community and primary care based services for their loneliness were not considered desirable or helpful at this point in their lives. However, group based activities with a shared interest were thought preferable to one-to-one support (befriending) or groups with a social focus. Descriptions of support as being for loneliness and specific to older people discouraged engagement. Older people experiencing or at risk of loneliness did not consider that primary care has a role in alleviating loneliness because it is not an illness. They thought primary care practitioners lack understanding of non-physical problems and that a good relationship was necessary to discuss sensitive issues like loneliness. For many, loneliness was a complex and private matter that they wished to manage without external support.

The Rotherham Social Prescribing Service for people with long-term conditions: a GP perspective

DAYSON Chris, MOSS Bronwen
2017

This thematic summary report explores the benefits and challenges of the Rotherham Social Prescribing from the perspective of GPs. It draws on qualitative interviews with 10 GPs and two Practice Managers and data extract from one GP surgery. It paints an overwhelmingly positive picture of the impact of Social Prescribing on GPs and patients, and highlights how the Service has quickly become a central component in a GPs options when treating the causes and consequences of long-term health conditions. Themes that emerged from GP interviews included: enabling GPs to take a holistic approach to health, developing GPs awareness of community-level support, reductions in GP workloads and reduction in medial prescribing. When GPs were asked how Social Prescribing benefitted patients, they referred to reductions in social isolation and loneliness; prevents family and carer breakdown; and providing person centred services. They also provided reflections on Rotherham Social Prescribing model, and what worked effectively.

Recovery-focused practice in mental health

LEESE Daniela, SMITHIES Lynda, GREEN Julie
2014

This article aims to identify service users and nurses perspectives on recovery -focused practice through themes in the literature. Seven studies and two reflective articles were selected for consideration. Three common themes emerged as essential nursing characteristics needed for recovery-focused practice: hope, person-centred care and consideration of service users' perspective. Recommendations on how practice could be improved are suggested from these themes. Key points include involving family members in care, involving service users in decisions, and spending time with service users to aid recovery.

Results 1 - 6 of 6

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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