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Results for 'befriending schemes'

Results 1 - 10 of 20

Ways to Wellbeing

York Council for Voluntary Service

Ways to Wellbeing York is a social prescribing service which aims to improve health and wellbeing through working with people referred by GPs to identify their needs and identify local services offering non-medical interventions which may be able to help. The pilot which started in 2016 offers a whole system approach to wellbeing, enabling people attending their GP to be referred to a range of support providing by over 40 voluntary and community services in the city. The service is hosted by York CVS and funded by the City Council and currently offers access to social prescription referrals through four surgeries in York based in areas of greater deprivation. The longer term aim if funding is secured is to provide a city-wide service with a target of 1,000 referrals.

Introduction to the research on: what works to improve social networks and prevent social isolation for people with mental health problems

HARFLETT Naomi, JENNINGS Yasmin, LINSKY Kate
2017

This short scoping review identifies research into what works to improve the social networks and prevent social isolation for people with mental health problems. Searches for the review were conducted on organisational websites and a range of databases, including Social Care Online, for UK based research published from 2000. The review provides an overview of the quantity and quality of the research and a table summarising the 24 studies reviewed and their key findings. It also provides a summary of areas identified for future research. The review found that the evidence around effectiveness of interventions to prevent loneliness and social isolation is patchy and findings are inconsistent. However, there is evidence to show that staff can play a key role in facilitating social networks and that activity-based interventions - such as horticulture, sport and learning - can increase social networks and reduce social isolation. The review also found that befriending may be beneficial to peoples’ mental health, but that there is inconclusive evidence on the impact of peer support.

HenPower

Equal Arts

“I’ve made some great friends through HenPower. What I like about HenPower is that you’re not entertained, you’re involved” (Tommy Appleby, 91, Hensioner, member of HenPower). HenPower was developed by Equal Arts in 2011 as a pilot project, funded by the Big Lottery Silver Dreams Programme with clear outcomes: to both assist and improve the health and wellbeing, and reduce the loneliness of thirty older people, specifically men. These activities were coupled by the project aiming to demonstrate the benefits of keeping hens in care homes alongside taking part in creativity and as ‘Hensioners’, introduce the hen-related activities and arts sessions to the wider community, such as school children. A Hensioner, like Tommy Appleby, fulfils the role of an active HenPower volunteer who can their use existing skills and knowledge to develop an expertise in hen-keeping. When the project was piloted, the eligibility of recruiting each Hensioner was that they had an interest to help others, who are less able then themselves. As champions of HenPower, the project established in care settings through volunteers, artists and project workers meeting with each of the care staff, residents and relatives to introduce creativity and hen-keeping in north-east England.

Music In Mind Camerata in the Community

Manchester Camerata

Manchester Camerata’s involvement with older members of the community began almost ten years ago, in which they ran music composition sessions for people living in care homes alongside Age Friendly Manchester. Since 2012, Camerata runs a programme entitled ‘Music in Mind’, a music-therapy based project for people living with dementia and their carers. This was in response to a growing number of people living with dementia in Greater Manchester, and an interest from Camerata orchestral musicians to deliver this work in partnership with Music Therapists.

Stockton Borough Council's Multi-Disciplinary Service

Stockton Borough Council

Stockton Borough Council established a Multi-Disciplinary Service (MDS) in October 2015, as part of their Better Care Fund plan. The process of designing and implementing the service was through creating a partnership with all key stakeholders in across health, social care and the voluntary sector: Hartlepool and Stockton-on-Tees CCG - Health Commissioners; Stockton-on-Tees Borough Council - Social Care; North Tees and Hartlepool FT - Acute and Community Health; Tees Esk and Wear Valleys FT - Mental Health Trust; and the Voluntary Community and Social Enterprise sector. The executive management teams of all partner organisations signed up to the MDS and have continued to support its development though regular updates at the Joint Health and Wellbeing Board.

ExtraCare's Wellbeing Programme

The ExtraCare Charitable Trust

ExtraCare’s Wellbeing Programme was developed in 2002, in partnership with older people who live at ExtraCare’s Schemes and Villages. The concept was launched following a survey, which highlighted that 75% of residents at one location had not accessed any health screening via their GPs or the NHS. A pilot screening scheme subsequently identified 122 previously undetected conditions amongst a population of just 136, highlighting a clear need for the Programme.

Care Homes Reading Project

University of Exeter

The Exeter Care Homes Reading Project began in the English Department at Exeter University in October 2011. Pioneered by Dr Johanna Harris and strongly supported by the student-led English Society, the project quickly became one of the University’s most successful student volunteer initiatives. The project aim is to strengthen links between young adults and older people, and to promote understanding, recognising that positive intergenerational relationships are key to a healthy community. Through a shared love of stories and poems, the conversations they spark and the human emotions they speak of and into, common ground is found.

Stay Up Late

Stay Up Late

Stay Up Late initiated as a campaign, set up by the punk band Heavy Load who played at many learning disability social clubs and discos, but were frustrated seeing the venues empty at around 9pm. They wanted to challenge and transform the practice of care homes and support workers operating strict rotas, thus excluding a whole population from enjoying late evenings socialising.

Mates 'n Dates

Guideposts Trust

"Before I joined Mates and Dates I didn’t go out in the evening unless it was a family occasion. Now I can look forward to going out once a month and to dates with my girlfriend in-between. It gives me something to look forward to.”

North and South London Cares. Evaluation and development through the Centre for Social Action Innovation Fund

RENAISI
2016

This report presents the findings from research and impact measurement of key projects undertaken by the North London Cares and South London Cares, demonstrating how the charities meet their core objectives of reducing isolation and loneliness amongst older people (and young professionals alike); improving the wellbeing, skills, resilience and connection of all participants; and bridging social and generational divides. The main projects comprise: Love Your Neighbour, supporting one-to-one friendships across social and generational divides; Social Clubs, aimed at older people who can still get out of the house, and want to interact with other older neighbours as well as local young people; Winter Wellbeing, a pro-active outreach effort that helps older neighbours to stay warm, active, healthy and connected during the most isolating time of year; and Community Fundraising, involving volunteers in major community fundraising effort through a ‘networked approach’. Drawing from the responses to a survey of new members (and follow up surveys), the report shows that there were little change for the scores for wellbeing for those who answered all surveys, except for an increase in anxiety. When looking at all responses, regardless of whether they stayed in contact for 12 months, the happiness score appears to be increasing, suggesting that some of those who were least happy dropped out of the survey. In the loneliness questions there was a decrease in the computed social loneliness score (questions about other people), but an increase in the emotional loneliness (questions about their sense of loneliness). The report also develops a new theory of change for the organisation, and sets out how to go about measuring impact against theory. The theory is based on five outcomes, which apply equally to both volunteers and older neighbours, and include: reducing isolation, improving wellbeing, increasing the feeling of belonging in the local community, living richer lives, and building bridges across social and generational divides.

Results 1 - 10 of 20

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