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Results for 'befriending schemes'

Results 11 - 20 of 20

Renew 37 - New Life Baptist Church

Nottinghamshire County Council

"Renewing community, renewing your mind, renewing spaces" - Drawing upon 5 ways to well-being' , which promote good mental and emotional health, Renew 37 is a well-being cafe project that is provided by the community for the community in the Nottinghamshire Area.

Sandwell Community Offers

Sandwell Metropolitan Borough Council

The Sandwell Community Offers are projects delivered by six lead organisations working in partnership across six localities in the Sandwell area, helping older people to stay well and healthy in their homes and communities. The Sandwell .Community Offers schemes were initially run as one pilot project, run within a single ward, which encouraged the growth of ‘friends and neighbours’ networks to support local vulnerable people. The limited resources within a single ward led Sandwell Council to commission Community Offer schemes within six localities, covering two to three wards each. Each of the localities chosen had already work ongoing whereby social work teams were reconfigured to match general practice catchment areas

More than medicine: new services for people powered health

LANGFORD Katharine, BAECK Peter, HAMPSON Martha
2013

Examines the constitutive elements of the ‘more than medicine’ approach, looking at social prescribing, signposting through link workers, health trainers and navigators, and community-based services. ‘More than medicine’ creates a set of tools for clinicians to use with patients to address the behavioural and social aspects of long term conditions. It connects the clinical consultation with interventions such as peer support groups, debt counselling, walking groups, befriending, one-to-one coaching and community cooking classes that help people to manage their long-term conditions and improve their health and wellbeing. These activities, places and people help service users and patients to live healthier lives, make friends and learn new skills. The report provides a description of each element of ‘more than medicine’ - social prescribing, signposting and community services - and illustrates the discussion with case studies and summaries of the evidence.

The social and economic impact of the Rotherham Social Prescribing Pilot: main evaluation report

DAYSON Chris, BASHIR Nadia
2014

Provides a detailed assessment of the social and economic impact of the Rotherham Social Prescribing Pilot from the perspective of key stakeholders. Social prescribing provides a way of linking patients in primary care and their carers with nonmedical sources of support within the community. Over the course of the pilot: 24 voluntary and community organisations (VCOs) received grants with a total value of just over £600,000 to deliver a menu of 31 separate social prescribing services; 1,607 patients were referred to the service, of whom 1,118 were referred on to funded VCS services; the five most common types of funded services referred to were information and advice, community activity, physical activities, befriending and enabling. The evaluation looked at the impact on the demand for hospital care and the economic and social benefits. The findings demonstrate that economic and social outcomes have been created for three main stakeholder groups: patients with LTCs and their carers, who have experienced improved mental health and greater engagement with the community; the local public sector, in particular health bodies, which have benefited from the reduced use of hospital resources; and the local voluntary and community sector, which has benefited from a catalytic investment in community level service provision.

Contact the Elderly Tea Parties

Contact the Elderly

Contact the Elderly organise monthly Sunday afternoon tea parties for small groups of older people , aged 75 and over, who live alone.

Commissioning befriending: a guide for adult social care commissioners

ASSOCIATION OF DIRECTORS OF ADULT SOCIAL SERVICES
2014

A guide developed to inform commissioners of adult social care about how befriending services are being delivered across the South West and how to effectively commissioning high quality befriending services. It describes what befriending is; the different ways it can be delivered; and the positive benefits it can have through improving health, well being and increasing independence. It also explains how people and communities can be involved in delivering and developing services through volunteering. Case study examples of current befriending practice are used throughout. The guide also draws upon materials and guidance produced by the Mentoring and Befriending Foundation (MBF) and feedback from commissioners and befriending providers through a series of consultations undertaken by the MBF.

Preventing loneliness and social isolation among older people

SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE, CONTACT THE ELDERLY
2012

This At a glance briefing explains the importance of tackling social isolation and loneliness, particularly among older people. It highlights the adverse effects of feeling isolated and describes a number of services that have been found to help reduce the problem. It draws on research evidence from SCIE's 'Research briefing 39: preventing loneliness and isolation: interventions and outcomes'. It also includes case study examples of two services - a befriending scheme and social group - that help to help mitigate loneliness and isolation and improve the wellbeing of older people.

Loneliness and isolation: evidence review

AGE UK
2012

Loneliness and isolation are not the same. The causes of loneliness are not just physical isolation and lack of companionship, but also sometimes the lack of a useful role in society. Estimates of prevalence of loneliness tend to concentrate on the older population and they vary widely, with reputable research coming up with figures of 6%-13% of the UK population being described as often or always lonely. This evidence review has been produced in order to provide evidence to underpin decision-making for people involved in commissioning, service development, fundraising and influencing. It discusses: the policy context; what is known about loneliness and isolation in older people; and what has been done (including one-to-one services, group services, and community involvement) and how effective they were. The key messages from the evidence are listed.

Ageing alone: loneliness and the 'oldest old'

KEMPTON James, TOMLIN Sam
2014

Loneliness occurs at all stages of life but little attention has been paid to its incidence and impact in the oldest old (85+), the fourth generation. This report begins by exploring: loneliness and why it matters; the incidence of loneliness in older people; and what is known about loneliness in the oldest old (85+). It then looks six contextual criteria that should be considered when initiating or commissioning interventions to tackle loneliness: rural and urban living; gender; health; living alone; community resilience; intergenerational interaction and ageism. Using case study analysis of projects that are tackling loneliness effectively, the report then explores practical steps that can be taken to reduce levels of loneliness among the oldest old. The case studies include one-to-one interventions, group services and building social networks; and encouraging wider community engagement. The case studies also illustrate the continued willingness of individuals of all ages to get involved in their local community. Whereas people might once have volunteered informally to help people they knew, ‘permission’ to initiate contact, through formalised and structured opportunities, is important. This is an important pointer as to how our modern society can organise itself to help address loneliness.

Promising returns: a commissioners guide to investing in mentoring and befriending programmes

MENTORING AND BEFRIENDING FOUNDATION
2012

This guide aims to give an overview of the range, diversity and positive impact of mentoring and befriending activity. Using case studies and programme examples, it outlines a range of mentoring and befriending approaches and identifies the key potential outcomes, including reduced offending, improved community cohesion, improved access to employment, reduced social isolation, higher aspirations and increased independence. The document also explains how the Mentoring and Befriending Foundation can support commissioners identify effective programmes.

Results 11 - 20 of 20

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