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Results for 'building design'

Results 1 - 4 of 4

All those who wander are not lost: walking with purpose in extra care, retirement and domestic housing

BARRETT Julie, EVANS Simon, PRITCHARD-WILKES Vanessa
2020

Sets out the findings from a mixed methods study exploring walking with purpose in extra care, retirement and domestic housing settings, along with the perceptions and responses of staff and family carers. The term ‘wandering’ has become a label with negative overtones in the context of dementia care and suggests aimlessness, whereas in fact there is often a purpose or aim behind this activity. In recognition of this, the term ‘walking with purpose’ is used in this study while also acknowledging that this includes ‘wandering’ as a normal and valuable human activity. The study indicates that, although residents who walk with purpose constitute a minority of people living in retirement and extra care housing schemes, managing walking with purpose can be a challenge for management and staff and can occupy a disproportionate amount of their time. The findings emphasise the importance of: getting to know the resident, finding out their motivations and reasons for walking and trying to accommodate their wishes; ensuring staff receive appropriate training in understanding and addressing walking with purpose; ensuring the design of the physical environment supports the way-finding abilities of people living with dementia. Example design recommendations that emerged from this study include: gardens and outdoor spaces must be secure and enclosed; provide safe indoor and outdoor walking routes with frequent places to rest and interesting things to see and do along the way; design features to assist with way-finding. The paper also supports the use of assistive technology devices such as contact ID wrist bands, door sensors, speaking door sensors, GPS trackers and alarm mats.

Housing our ageing population: learning from councils meeting the housing needs of ageing population

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2017

The suitability of the housing stock is of critical importance to the health of individuals and also impacts on public spending, particularly social care and the NHS. This report sets out what is required to meet the housing needs and aspirations of an ageing population, outlines the current policy context and presents detailed case studies of good practice to show how councils are innovating to support older people to live in their homes for longer and promote positive ageing. They include examples of integrated approaches to health, housing and care to support older people at home; care and repair schemes to provide support for older people in mainstream housing, long term housing planning; and developing appropriate new housing for older people. The case studies are from Birmingham City Council, Central Bedfordshire Council, Essex County Council, Mansfield District Council, Newcastle City Council, North Somerset, Bristol, Bath and North-East Somerset Councils, and Worcestershire County Council. The report highlights key lessons from the case studies: having a clear vision, promoting awareness and changing attitudes; housing planning, which meets local need and involves older people; delivering and enabling new housing for older people across the public and private sector; developing integrated approaches to housing, health and care; and sustaining older people in mainstream housing. It also outlines recommendations for Government, policy makers, councils, and providers.

Transforming integrated care – using telecare as a catalyst for change

THOMPSON Frances
2012

This article discusses how to successfully mainstream telecare to transform service delivery and provide more preventative and personalised care for people of all ages and abilities. Based on experiences from the city of Wakefield, a metropolitan district of West Yorkshire, England, the article explores the use of technology and support systems, such as door sensors, smoke detectors or flood sensors, to assist vulnerable people by improving and improving well-being and maintaining independence, enabling individuals to live safely and securely at home for as long as possible. Alongside the management of adults and older people, telecare has also had a positive impact on the support of people with learning disabilities. The article concludes that to successfully integrate and mainstream telecare, there needs to be adequate training and assessment for all staff involved in the implementation in order to deliver a sustainable and deliverable telecare service. Overall, the cost efficiencies were crucial when considering the future of telecare and, with significant cost savings made over a relatively short period, the potential for future investments was a significant factor for the continuing delivery of services.

Well-being through design: transferability of design concepts for healthcare environments to ordinary community settings

BOEX Will, BOEX Sam
2012

The concept of well-being is now well established, both in ordinary language and in UK Government policy. There is now a growing interest in looking at the effects on environmental design on well-being. The aim of this paper is to explore current interest in the concept of well-being, and to trace the growing use of design ideas in healthcare settings to reduce stress and maximise efficiency. The potential in this approach is illustrated with some examples of design approaches applied in healthcare. The patient journey through the healthcare setting is considered in terms of ‘touch points’ such as the car park, the entrance, corridors, and the work area. These design concepts and approaches seem also to promise similar benefits in community settings where issues in managing the health and well-being of vulnerable individuals are equally relevant. They may be especially useful in current efforts towards creating dementia-friendly homes and communities, or ‘psychologically informed environments’ in services for marginalised and excluded individuals.

Results 1 - 4 of 4

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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