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Results for 'care homes'

Results 1 - 10 of 33

Adopt a Care Home: an intergenerational initiative bringing children into care homes

DI BONA Laura, KENNEDY Sheila, MOUNTAIN Gail
2019

Dementia friendly communities, in which people living with dementia actively participate and those around them are educated about dementia, may improve the wellbeing of those living with dementia and reduce the associated stigma. The Adopt a Care Home scheme aims to contribute towards this by teaching schoolchildren about dementia and linking them with people living with dementia in a local care home. Forty-one children, 10 people living with dementia and 8 school/care home staff participated in a mixed methods (questionnaires, observations, interviews and focus groups) evaluation to assess the scheme’s feasibility and impact. Data were analysed statistically and thematically. The scheme was successfully implemented, increased children’s dementia awareness and appeared enjoyable for most participants. Findings, therefore, demonstrate the scheme’s potential to contribute towards dementia friendly communities by increasing children’s knowledge and understanding of dementia and engaging people living with dementia in an enjoyable activity, increasing their social inclusion.

How do “robopets” impact the health and well‐being of residents in care homes? A systematic review of qualitative and quantitative evidence

ABBOTT Rebecca, et al
2019

BACKGROUND: Robopets are small animal-like robots which have the appearance and behavioural characteristics of pets. OBJECTIVE(S): To bring together the evidence of the experiences of staff, residents and family members of interacting with robopets and the effects of robopets on the health and well-being of older people living in care homes. DESIGN: Systematic review of qualitative and quantitative research. DATA SOURCES: This study searched 13 electronic databases from inception to July 2018 and undertook forward and backward citation chasing. METHOD(S): Eligible studies reported the views and experiences of robopets from residents, family members and staff (qualitative studies using recognised methods of qualitative data collection and analysis) and the effects of robopets on the health and well-being of care home residents (randomised controlled trials, randomised crossover trials and cluster randomised trials). Study selection was undertaken independently by two reviewers. This study used the Wallace criteria and the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool to assess the quality of the evidence. This study developed a logic model with stakeholders and used this as a framework to guide data extraction and synthesis. Where appropriate, meta-analysis were used to combine effect estimates from quantitative studies. RESULT(S): Nineteen studies (10 qualitative, 2 mixed methods and 7 randomised trials) met the inclusion criteria. Interactions with robopets were described as having a positive impact on aspects of well-being including loneliness, depression and quality of life by residents and staff, although there was no corresponding statistically significant evidence from meta-analysis for these outcomes. Meta-analysis showed evidence of a reduction in agitation with the robopet "Paro" compared to control (-0.32 [95% CI -0.61 to -0.04, p = 0.03]). Not everyone had a positive experience of robopets. CONCLUSION(S): Engagement with robopets appears to have beneficial effects on the health and well-being of older adults living in care homes, but not all chose to engage. Whether the benefits can be sustained are yet to be investigated. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Robopets have the potential to benefit people living in care homes, through increasing engagement and interaction. With the robopet acting as a catalyst, this engagement and interaction may afford comfort and help reduce agitation and loneliness.

Giving medicines covertly: A quick guide for care home managers and home care managers providing medicines support

SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE, NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR HEALTH AND CARE EXCELLENCE
2019

This quick guide will help care home and home care managers to ensure that decisions about giving medicines covertly are made in the person’s best interests. It covers: capacity and consent; making a decision to give medicines covertly; urgent decisions; and involving others. It has been co-produced by NICE and SCIE and is based on NICE’s guidelines and quality standards.

The best of both worlds: a closer look at creating spaces that connect young and old

GOYER Amy
2019

This report explores the barriers and opportunities to the development and expansion of intergenerational shared sites, focusing on the experience of sites in the United States. It builds on an earlier report 'All In Together', which identified the positive benefits that intergenerational shared sites could have for older people, young people and children. Interviews with staff and board members at intergenerational shared sites, national policy and program experts identified four key phases in the development and operation of shared sites. These are: Creating the vision, which included nurturing champions and building partnerships; Making it work, from finding resources to designing the space to navigating regulations; Building intergenerational relationships; and Maintaining momentum. The report discusses each of these phases and strategies to address them, drawing on practice from the shared sites. It is hoped that by developing a better understanding of these pivotal phases, organisations and communities will be able to make further progress and further develop intergenerational shared sites.

Embedding community circles in support for older people living in residential care homes or extra care: a practical resource

ROUTLEDGE Martin, BARTON Cath, WILTON Sharon
2019

Based upon the first two years of experience developing Community Circles in Wigan, this resource shares learning and progress to date. It also outlines the key roles and activities to consider when setting up Community Circles in residential care homes and extra care housing. It will be useful for anyone wanting to include Community Circles as part of the offer of support for older people in residential care or extra care. It will also be of wider use to those looking to embed a range of person and community centred approaches in these types of support. Links to additional guides, reports, tools and materials are included throughout.

Animal magic: the benefits of being around and caring for animals across care settings

CARE INSPECTORATE
2019

A collection of case studies which show how being around and caring for animals can benefit many children and adults using a range of care services. It shows how animals and pets can enhance the quality of life of children and adults by helping with relaxation, providing companionship, enhancing relationships, providing a positive focus to people's lives, and encouraging people to be active and making them feel happier. Contact with animals can also enhance relationships with their families, their friends and with care professionals - promoting a culture of kindness for people of all ages. The case studies include examples from very sheltered housing support, fostering services, homeless hostels, dementia care, and care homes. Each case study is annotated with details of relevant Scottish Health and Social Care Standards (Dignity and respect, Compassion, Be included, Responsive care and support, and Wellbeing) and Getting it Right for Every Child (GIRFEC) wellbeing indicators that apply to the example.

The impact of attending day care designed for home-dwelling people with dementia on nursing home admission: a 24-month controlled study

ROKSTAD Anne Marie Mork, et al
2018

Background: Day care services offer meaningful activities, a safe environment for attendees and respite for family caregivers while being expected to delay the need for nursing home (NH) admission. However, previous research has shown inconsistent results regarding postponement of NH admission. The objective of the study was to explore the influence of a day care programme designed for home-dwelling people with dementia on NH admission. Method: A quasi-experimental trial explored the proportion of patients permanently admitted to nursing homes after 24 months as the main outcome by comparing a group of day care attendees (DG) and a group of participants without day care (CG). In all, 257 participants were included (181 in DG and 76 in CG). A logistic regression model was developed with NH admission as the outcome. Participant group (DG or CG) was the main predictor, baseline patient and family caregiver characteristics and interactions were used as covariates. Results: The mean age of participants was 81.5 (SD 6.4), 65% were women and 53% lived alone. The mean MMSE score was 20.4 (SD 3.5). In all, 128 (50%) of the participants were admitted to a nursing home by the 24-month follow-up, 63 participants (25%) completed the follow-up assessment and 66 (26%) dropped out due to death (8%) and other reasons (18%). In the logistic unadjusted regression model for NH admission after 24 months, participant group (DG or CG) was not found to be a significant predictor of NH admission. The results from the adjusted model revealed that the participant group was associated with NH admission through the interactions with age, living conditions, affective symptoms, sleep symptoms and practical functioning, showing a higher probability for NH admission in DG compared to CG. Conclusion: The study reveals no evidence to confirm that day care services designed for people with dementia postpone the need for NH admission. Admission to nursing homes seems to be based on a complex mix of personal and functional characteristics both in the person with dementia and the family caregivers. The findings should be considered in accordance with the limitation of inadequate power and the high drop-out rate.

Creativity in care: evaluation report

CITY ARTS
2014

An evaluation of Creativity in Care, a programme commissioned by Nottinghamshire County Council which explored creative approaches to promoting well-being for older people in care and ways of overcoming the barriers that face staff, carers and homes in trying to provide creative and imaginative environments for older people. This report reviews the outcomes of three aspects of the programme: the artist residency, creative mentoring and training. It also sets out recommendations based on the findings. The evaluation identifies the main learning outcomes of the programme as: learning – new approaches were developed by staff resulting in improved motivation and engagement of residents; social skills – positive interaction between residents increased, with one to one work supporting social engagement for the more isolated residents; and value – an improved sense of wellbeing was gained through participation in the arts, with improved levels of confidence and increased decision making; Legacy - the programme led to improved communication, networking and sharing between care homes. Training was also accessed by residential care staff to put into practice beyond the life of the programme.

Residents and volunteers: sharing the learning

ABBEYFIELD SOCIETY, AVISON Tracey Berridge, JARVIS Sunnie
2018

This good practice guide shares some of the practical learning from those involved in the Residents as Volunteers project, which supported older people aged over-75 years living in a residential home setting to volunteer. The project was delivered in partnership by Abbeyfield Society and NCVO, and funded by the Big Lottery fund. The guide summarises some of the emotional, social, mental and physical health benefits for residents involved in the project. It then provides advice for getting residents and staff ready to take part in volunteering initiatives; provides ideas to help overcome barriers to volunteering; and ways of identifying volunteering opportunities both inside and outside the home. Case studies from three sites who took part in the Residents as Volunteers project are included: Drake Lodge, Abbeyfield Tavistock Society, Abbeyfield The Dales Society, and Abbeyfield Retirement Living in Nottingham are also included.

Residents as volunteers: final evaluation report

NATIONAL COUNCIL FOR VOLUNTARY ORGANISATIONS, HORNUNG Lisa
2018

An evaluation of the Residents as Volunteers project, which aimed to support older people aged over-75 years living in a residential home setting to volunteer and to measure the impact of volunteering on well-being and quality of life. The project was delivered in partnership by Abbeyfield Society and NCVO, and funded by the Big Lottery fund. A total of 110 residents volunteered during the project. Those participating felt that volunteering had a positive impact on their emotional and social well-being and many also reported that volunteering helped them to stay physically and mentally active. The evaluation identified a number of barriers to volunteering faced by care home residents. These included feeling too old, having a health condition, lack of confidence, narrow views of volunteering or anti-volunteering sentiment. The project also found it was far more difficult to reach residents that had never volunteered before. It also identified barriers for staff and care homes themselves, including existing social interactions, staff to resident ratio, existing volunteering culture and non-supportive environment or lack of management buy-in. The report makes some suggestions to overcome these barriers.

Results 1 - 10 of 33

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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