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Results for 'care homes'

Results 1 - 10 of 22

'My nature' - an effective tool for residential care

BREWIN Wendy, ORR Noreen, GARSIDE Ruth
2018

Experiencing nature is increasingly recognised as having a positive impact on the health and wellbeing of older people living in care homes. This practice example of "My Nature" activities toolkit designed to solve the problem of access to green spaces, which can be difficult for older people with dementia in care homes. Sensory Trust and the University of Exeter collaborated on developing 'My Nature', an evidence based training toolkit to help care staff identify ways in which nature can not only play a role in a resident's care plan but also support them in their work. The toolkit consists of: evidence booklets, nature based activities and a wall chart. The toolkit was piloted and then evaluated to see how far it could achieve the health and wellbeing gains that access to nature can provide. Two care homes in Cornwall participated in the pilot. Activities demonstrated in the pilots include: nature palettes, nature mapping, painting by nature and a tea tasting party. Key findings from the evaluation: the activities succeeded in getting residents out into the gardens and also stimulated interaction, enjoyment and pleasure. For staff, the activities proved to be adaptable to different contexts, could be planned in advanced and person-centred. Challenges identified include: the activities did not appear to appeal to male residents and care home culture.

Experiences of being: the benefit of drama, music and dancing in improving the wellbeing of older people in care homes

NANDAKUMARA Reva
2017

This report highlights the benefits of using drama and creative techniques with older people, in particular those with dementia. It outlines the results of an initiative which ran drama workshops in 17 Anchor care homes, with the intention that they could become a sustainable part of the activities led by the care home staff to improve the lives of residents, both physically and mentally. A professional drama teacher worked collaboratively with the staff at each care home, and provided opportunities for staff to suggest modifications to the workshops. The results highlight the mental and physical health benefits of the creative activities for care home residents and the sustainability of the methods provided by the trainer at the various care homes. The report concludes that the workshops provide a simple and effective way of improving the experience of care home residents and can easily become part of the selection of regular activities available at care homes. They are inexpensive and scalable and, led to an improvement in residents level of self-esteem and self-worth. Care staff also found that the sessions enhanced communication, giving residents the opportunity to share their knowledge and experience and talk about their lives, homes and communities.

Arts in care homes: a rapid mapping of training provision

ALLEN Penny
2018

This report uses desk research, interviews and online searches to map creative training provision available to artists and staff working in care homes in the UK. The mapping took place in 2017 and identified examples of good practice, innovative delivery, and opportunities for growth and development. It total, 65 providers of training were identified, delivering training in person or online. Training was aimed at artists, health/care providers, volunteers, arts venues, activity coordinators and friends/family. Seven main types of training opportunity identified: toolkits; one-off workshops; whole home and leadership training; maintenance models; mentoring; networks and peer learning; and conferences. The results highlight the diverse nature of the sector and the multiple pathways for people to access training, which present both challenges and opportunities for training providers. The author also highlights variation in quality of provision and argues for a system of accreditation. Case study examples are included throughout the report, and appendices provide links to a range of toolkits and providers.

LAUGH research project

Cardiff Metropolitan University

The Ludic Artefacts Using Gesture & Haptics (LAUGH) research project was born out of an identified need for playful objects for people with advanced dementia and based on literature and previous research on the benefits to wellbeing of playfulness and hand-use. The aims of the project were to look at: How can handcraft and creative making inform the development of new devices and playful activities to promote individual and social wellbeing for people with dementia? And how might handcraft activities be augmented via new technologies and smart materials to produce new kinds of engaging, playful artefacts to amuse, distract, comfort, engage, bring joy, and promote ‘in the moment’ living for people with dementia?

LAUGH: playful objects in advanced dementia care

TREADAWAY Cathy
2018

The article reports on an international research project led by the Cardiff School of Art and Design at Cardiff Metropolitan University to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia. The aim of the project was to understand the best ways to design objects that can give pleasure and comfort to people in the advanced stages of dementia and to provide guidance for designers working in the sector. The article discusses the participatory approach to the research, testing and feedback and provides an example of one of the LAUGH objects that was found to have a significant impact on wellbeing - a comforting "Hug". The article also covers how the objects stimulate memories and some of the outcomes from the project and future direction.

Imagine Arts: how the arts can transform care homes

BROOME Emma
2018

Imagine Arts was a three year programme funded by Arts Council England and the Baring Foundation involving a collaboration between the national home care provider Abbeyfield, Nottingham council, local arts organisations and Nottingham University. The aim was to enrich the lives of older people in care homes. Residents in 17 care homes took part in the programme, many of whom had dementia. This article discusses the outcomes of an independent evaluation that looked at the impact of Arts on care homes. Findings suggest that the delivery of high quality arts activities in care homes is feasible. Overall, residents had positive reflections and socialisation seemed to improve as the series of arts sessions progressed. The article also discusses the culture shift that is needed to embed the arts fully in residential care. The article also comments on the project legacy and provides some recommendations for care homes looking to introduce arts programmes.

Homemade circus handbook

UPSWING
2018

Homemade Circus is a project that uses circus to improve the health and wellbeing of older people. This booklet enables care homes and day centres to try out some simple circus games themselves. It includes advice on running activities such as juggling games, push hands, scarf juggling and feather balancing. Each activity is described as a progression, starting with simple movements and actions that require very little verbal instruction. The guide also provides advice on opening and closing activity sessions. The activities provide an opportunity for residents and carers to have fun together, learn new skills and try something new. The activities also support the interaction and co-operation between participants and staff.

Staying on my feet. Falls prevention: best practice guide for care homes in Wales

MY HOME LIFE CYMRU
2018

This best practice guide, which has been funded by the Welsh Government, explores what works well in supporting care home residents to remain mobile and to reduce their risk of falling. It draws on the experiences of care home staff attending events in Wales to share their expertise and stories of good practice. The guide includes examples on how care home practitioners can support residents to navigate safely around the home; how they can help residents feel motivated to get out of their chair and engage in physical activity, and how they can encourage residents to drink or eat properly. It also shows how staff have to consider how they help get the balance between reducing the risks of falling with the rights of these individuals to make choices. The guide highlights a number of creative individual strategies. It also includes a Care Home Falls Prevention Wheel which identifies 8 key areas that together can support best practice.

Building relationships between the generations: the case of the co-located nursery

NIGHTINGALE HAMMERSON
2018

This case study describes the development of the UK’s first intergenerational nursery, a partnership between the Apples and Honey Nursery group and the Jewish elderly care home charity Nightingale Hammerson. It covers the different stages of the project, from the initial idea, building community support and setting up a weekly intergenerational baby and toddler group in January 2017, to opening a day nursery within the grounds in September 2017, where intergenerational sessions between nursery children and care home residents take place daily. The report includes feedback from the first year of the intergenerational programme, including the views of families who attend the baby and toddler group, residents of the care home, volunteers, physiotherapists, parents from the new nursery, and staff from both organisations. It also includes early lessons learned as a result of including nursery children into weekly exercise classes with residents and observations from early year's teachers as to the impact of intergenerational play on the very young and those with dementia.

Effectiveness of complex falls prevention interventions in residential aged care settings: a systematic review

FRANCIS-COAD Jacqueline, et al
2018

Objective: The objective of this review was to synthesize the best available evidence for the effectiveness of complex falls prevention interventions delivered at two or more of the following levels: resident, facility or organization, on fall rates in the residential aged care (RAC) population. Introduction: Preventing falls in the high risk RAC population is a common global goal with acknowledged complexity. Previous meta-analyses have not specifically addressed complexity, described as falls prevention intervention delivery at multiple levels of a RAC organization, to determine its effect on fall outcomes. Inclusion criteria: The current review considered studies that included participants who were aged 65 years and over residing in long-term care settings providing 24-hour supervision and/or care assistance. Studies that evaluated complex falls prevention interventions delivered by single discipline or multidisciplinary teams across at least two or all of the following levels: residents, RAC facility and RAC organization were eligible. Experimental study designs including randomized controlled trials, controlled clinical trials and quasi-experimental trials that reported on measures related to fall incidence were considered, namely, rate of falls (expressed as the number of falls per 1000 occupied bed days), the number of participants who became fallers (expressed as the number of participants who fell once or more) and the rate of injurious falls (expressed as the number of falls with injury per 1000 occupied bed days). Methods: A three-step search strategy was undertaken, commencing with an initial scoping search of MEDLINE and CINAHL databases prior to an extensive search of all relevant published literature, clinical trial registries and gray literature. Two independent reviewers assessed selected studies for methodological validity using the standardized critical appraisal instrument from the Joanna Briggs Institute System for the Unified Management, Assessment and Review of Information (JBI SUMARI). Data were extracted from the selected studies using the standardized data extraction tool from JBI SUMARI. Quantitative data were pooled in statistical meta-analysis for rate of falls, the number of participants who became fallers and the rate of injurious falls. Meta-analysis was conducted using a random-effect model with heterogeneity assessed using the standard Chi-squared and I2 index. Where statistical pooling was not possible, study findings were presented in narrative form. Results: Twelve studies were included in this review with seven being eligible for meta-analysis. Complex falls prevention interventions delivered at multiple levels in RAC populations did not show a significant effect in reducing fall rates (MD = −1.29; 95% CI [−3.01, 0.43]), or the proportion of residents who fell (OR = 0.76; 95% CI [0.42, 1.38]). However, a sensitivity analysis suggested complex falls prevention interventions delivered with additional resources at multiple levels had a significant positive effect in reducing fall rates (MD = −2.26; 95% CI [−3.72, −0.80]). Conclusions: Complex falls prevention interventions delivered at multiple levels in the RAC population may reduce fall rates when additional staffing, expertise or resources are provided. Organizations may need to determine how resources can be allocated to best address falls prevention management. Future research should continue to investigate which combinations of multifactorial interventions are effective.

Results 1 - 10 of 22

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LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project New practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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