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Results for 'care reform'

Results 1 - 4 of 4

Place-based health: a position paper

STUDDERT Jessica, STOPFORTH Sarah
2015

This position paper sets out some of the challenges in achieving a fundamental structural shift in the health system, citing new evidence from health and local government professionals. The paper sets out the potential of reimagining health as place-based, taking an asset-based approach and focusing on shaping demands in the longer term and ultimately producing better health and wellbeing outcomes. Underpinning this approach is the recognition of the wider determinants of health, where fewer health outcomes result from clinical treatment and the majority are determined by wider factors such as lifestyle choices, the physical environment and family and social networks. Place-based health would mean reconceptualising ‘health’ from something that happens primarily within institutions, to involve all local assets and stakeholders in a shift towards something that all parts of the community, and individuals themselves, recognise and feel part of. This would mean the individual would move from being a recipient of interventions from separate institutions to being at the heart of place-based health. The paper intends to lay out the challenge for the Place-Based Health Commission, which will report in March 2016 and recommend practical steps for professionals in health and care to overcome organisational barriers – real and perceived – and make a fundamental shift towards an integrated system that puts people at the heart of it.

Creating a better care system: setting out key considerations for a reformed, sustainable health, wellbeing and care system of the future

ERNST AND YOUNG
2015

In this report, commissioned by the Local Government Association, a journey towards better health and care for individuals is set out; driven by local system leaders and supported by a more empowering and enabling system. The report has been developed through: a review of existing literature published by partners, charities and research organisations; four workshops with the LGA and partners to define the vision, understand the system barriers from a range of perspectives and describe the required changes; and further discussion with regional contacts and the Health Transformation Task Group to sense check that barriers and key considerations are locally relevant and reflect the experience in local areas. Section 1 sets out a vision for better care and support, arguing that a reformed system needs to deliver: better health and wellbeing more equally enjoyed; better choice and control for all; better quality care, tailored for each person; and better outcomes for each pound spent. Section 2 focuses on key barriers preventing the achievement of a reformed system. These include: creating dependency through the way treatment is provided; chronic underfunding of the system and a lack of capacity to transform; fragmented commissioning incentivising treatment over demand management; and national regulations that disempower local areas. Section 3 sets out four steps to better care, which are: put people in control; fund services adequately and in an aligned way; devolve power to join up care, support and wellbeing; and free the system from national constraints. The report concludes that collectively these steps will enable localities to address challenges, deliver a better system and ultimately drive better outcomes and greater sustainability for all.

The bigger picture: policy insights and recommendations

LLOYD James
2014

This report evaluates the performance of government policy on care and support of older people who struggle with day-to-day activities in England during the period 2011 to 2013, using the data and insights from ‘The bigger picture: understanding disability and care in England’s older population’. Part 1 of this report examines the reach of publicly funded support; the unmet need in the older population; and variation and consistency of care and support. Part 2 considers the implications of the Care Act implementation and looks at policy development beyond 2016, focusing on eligible needs after the Act, financial eligibility and the means test after 2016 and mapping, identifying and engaging older population groups. The report concludes that given the feasibility and budget challenges implied by the sheer numbers of older people experiencing difficulties with activities of daily living, a rethink and revolution is required among national and local policymakers around how individuals and families are engaged and supported. This will mean revisiting the balance between consistency and variation in services organised by local authorities, as well as fully integrating and exploiting the different ‘touch points’ and ‘gateways’ available for engaging the older population. It will also mean evaluating which aspects of the vision of the Care Act need to be fulfilled by local authorities directly, or can be devolved to empowered, third-party charities and organisations at a local level.

Local area coordination: from service users to citizens

BROAD Ralph
2012

An exploration of how local area coordination can support people to pursue their vision for a good life, build stronger communities and help reform care services in England and Wales. Local area coordinators, from within their own local communities, provide information, advice and support to help people to solve their own problems. Instead of focusing on deficits, they help people focus on their own vision for a good life, building on their own assets and relationships and acting as a bridge to communities. The model is built on seven key principles, which include: citizenship; relationships; information; the gifts that each member of the community can bring; expertise; leadership; and services as a back up to natural support. The report argues that local area coordination offers the chance for the whole service system to rebalance itself and to focus on local solutions and stronger communities, whilst also offering a powerful catalyst to wider social care system reform.

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