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Results for 'carers'

Results 11 - 20 of 33

The state of Shared Lives in England: report 2016

SHARED LIVES PLUS
2016

This report draws on a survey of Shared Lives Plus members across the country to provide an analysis of services across England, covering the period 2014/15. The report includes figures on numbers of people using Shared Lives services, the number of carers, staff turnover and motivation, types of arrangement (live in, short breaks and day support) and numbers of users by region. The results show that the number of people using Shared Lives support is continuing to rise. In 2014/15 11,570 people were getting help from Shared Lives compared to 10,440 in 2013/14. People with learning disabilities remain the primary users of Shared Lives support, accounting for 76% of all users. The next largest group getting help via Shared Lives were people with mental health problems who made up 7% of users. The survey also reports a rise in both the number of older people and people with dementia using Shared Lives. There has also been an increase of over 50% in use of Shared Lives as day support. Projected cost savings are provided to show the total savings that could be made if Shared Lives reached its full potential. Short case studies are also included to illustrate the benefits of Shared Lives schemes.

People2People

Shropshire Council

People2People are an independent not-for-profit social work practice based in Shropshire who support older people and adults with disabilities to live as independently as possible and for as long as possible as part of their communities, leading active and fulfilled lives. They encourage people to draw on their own strengths, their natural supports and community assets first before considering paid support.

A shared life is a healthy life: how the Shared Lives model of care can improve health outcomes and support the NHS

SHARED LIVES PLUS
2015

Explains how Shared Lives schemes support people with health needs, making use of community based solutions which can be more cost effective than traditional institutional care. In Shared Lives, an adult (and sometimes a 16/17 year old) who needs support and/or accommodation moves in with or regularly visits an approved Shared Lives carer, after they have been matched for compatibility. Together they share family and community life. Half of the 12,000 UK citizens using Shared Lives are living with their carer as part of a supportive household; half visit their carer for day support or overnight breaks. Shared Lives is also used as a stepping stone for an individual to possibly become fully independent. The report demonstrates that this approach can provide care at lower cost; improves people’s health; reduces pressure on health services; and reduces inequalities in health service provision.

Prevention: a shared commitment: making the case for a Prevention Transformation Fund

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2015

This document identifies and collates key pieces of evidence about the cost effectiveness of prevention in order to make the case for greater investment in prevention interventions. The report recommends that the Government should introduce a Prevention Transformation Fund, worth at least £2 billion annually. This would enable some double running of new investment in preventative services alongside ‘business as usual’ in the current system, until savings can be realised and reinvested into the system – as part of wider local prevention strategies. Based on the analysis of an extensive range of intervention case studies that have provided a net cost benefit, the report suggests that investment in prevention could yield a net return of 90 per cent.

Peer support for people with dementia: a social return on investment (SROI) study

SEMPLE Amy, WILLIS Elizabeth, de WAAL Hugo
2015

Reports on a study using Social Return on Investment (SROI) analysis to examine the impact and social value of peer support groups as an intervention for people with dementia. Three peer support groups in South London participated in the study. A separate SROI analysis was carried out for each individual group to find out what people valued about the groups and how they helped them. The report presents the outcomes for each group, the indicators for evidencing these outcomes and the quality and duration of outcomes experienced. It then provides detail on the methodology used to calculate the impact and the social return on investment. Overall, the study found that peer support groups provide positive outcomes for people with dementia, their carers and the volunteers who support the groups. The benefits of participating in peer support groups included: reduced isolation and loneliness; increased stimulation, including mental stimulation; and increased wellbeing. Carers experienced a reduction in carer stress, carer burden and reduction in the feeling of loneliness. Volunteers had an increased sense of wellbeing through their engagement with the group, improved knowledge of dementia and gained transferrable skills. Overall the study found that for every pound (£) of investment the social value created by the three groups evaluated ranged from £1.17 to £5.18.

Ageing in the UK: trends and foresight: report 7

FLATTERS Paul, JOHNSON Tom, O'SHEA Ruairi
2015

Presents key information and data on the UK ageing population, including an analysis of current trends and the implications for the future. The report sets out the national picture, focusing on the demographic context, the state of income, pensions and retirement arrangements, and health issues. In addition, the report considers a range of aspects associated with old age, including: loneliness, dementia, older carers, volunteering, and digital inclusion. The report indicates that the population of the UK is set to increase significantly over the next decade, with much of this growth driven by an ageing population and sustained increases in the number of people over 65 years old. While the number of older people living in relative or absolute poverty has not increased since the start of the economic downturn, the minimum income standard for pensioners has risen and many of those on low incomes have trouble meeting everyday expenditure. The report suggests that higher dependency ratios will place huge demand on already strained public services, requiring greater support from the charitable sector. The impact of dementia will be a significant area of need in the future: even if incidence rates remain stable, the growth in the population of people over the age of 65 will see the number affected more than double from c.800,000 in 2012 to 2.2m in 2051. However, the report concludes that it is likely that incidence rates for dementia will increase as longevity continues to increase and diagnosis improves.

Social care for marginalised communities: balancing self-organisation, micro-provision and mainstream support

CARR Sarah
2014

This briefing reviews recent research on social care support provision for certain people with protected characteristics under the Equality Act 2010, who are often seldom heard in mainstream services. It draws out messages for social care micro-providers and social care commissioners, focusing on two areas: the marginalising dynamics in mainstream, statutory social care support provision for certain people with protected characteristics; and how local community, specialist or small-scale services are responding to unmet need for support and advice among marginalised groups. The majority of research identified looked at issues and experiences of black and minority ethnic (BME) communities, with a large number of studies dedicated to understanding the role of family carers, particularly from South Asian backgrounds. A smaller body of work on lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) older people and carers was found. Similarly, a number of research studies on support for and by refugees and asylum seekers were identified. Some research on the role of faith was also found. By comparing research findings across several groups, common issues about engagement with mainstream services and the function of community based and specialist support became apparent. The main themes and messages coming from the research for commissioners and providers focus on: strategies for responding to marginalisation from the mainstream, including assets and community mobilisation, reciprocity and social inclusion, informal networks and self-organisation; accessing and engaging with mainstream provision, highlighting issues of fear of discrimination, uniformity and homogenisation, language and communication; relationship dynamics between large, traditional mainstream and small, specialist community, including capacity building and partnerships, advocacy and accessing mainstream support, choice and voice; understanding informal support in diverse communities, in which a key role is played by culture, stigma and shame, well-being, identity and resilience, and faith; and effective approaches, including emotional and social support, and non-conventional, networked and holistic support.

The liveable lives study: understanding everyday help and support: report

ANDERSON Simon, BROWNLIE Julie, MILNE Elisabeth-Jane
2015

This study highlights an overlooked component of social cohesion – everyday acts of informal help and support within communities. While such acts are often mundane and practical - small loans, lifts, help with shopping - they can also have a significant emotional dimension. Although these acts are often simple, navigating them is not: the researchers find that opposing moral forces complicate this picture. Concepts of the ‘deserving’, of stoicism and the imperative to help others all feature in this study. Key points include: the character of informal support among family, friends and even strangers is shaped by the social and physical characteristics of areas but also by the narratives that attach to them; in the often unspoken moral framework underpinning these interactions, both reciprocity (giving back) and mutuality (where both parties benefit from the interaction) are important elements; public policy needs to recognise both the interactional complexity and the emotional significance of everyday help and support. In the context of political debate around austerity and the scope of the state, the infrastructural qualities of such relationships need to be recognised. While such support makes possible other aspects of social life, it also requires maintenance and repair in its own right.

Understanding everyday help and support: summary

ANDERSON Simon, BROWNLIE Julie, MILNE Elisabeth-Jane
2015

A summary of a study examining low-level or everyday help and support and the role it can play in allowing people to lead ‘liveable’ lives. The study explored the ways in which the need for (and availability of) such support is shaped by social context, biography and relationships. It also looked at how support actually happens (or not) and how it is sustained over time. Key findings included: small acts of help, support and kindness were often mundane and barely noticed (even by those involved), but had fundamental consequences for individual and community well-being; although this everyday help was often practical, it could have important emotional consequences; individual circumstances, life stage and life events (e.g. parenting, ill health, retirement) created needs for informal help and support, but also ways of potentially meeting those needs; powerful emotions and moral considerations attached to these apparently straightforward acts, particularly notions of reciprocity and who should be considered deserving of help; many of the perceived risks of helping or being helped related to people’s concerns about their self-image or how others saw them; collectively, these acts and relationships of everyday help and support had an ‘infrastructural’ quality - they made possible other aspects of social life, but needed attention, maintenance and repair in their own right. The briefing concludes that while it is not possible to legislate for kindness, attempts should be made to avoid damaging – and, where possible, foster and extend – the conditions in which it occurs.

Revitalise Respite Holidays

Revitalise

Revitalise provides respite holidays with on-call nursing care for people with disabilities in the UK. Celebrating its 50th anniversary in 2014 its work is underpinned by the belief that everybody needs a break. It aims to improve the quality of life for those living with a disability and also their carers. By providing a guilt- and stress-free break, Revitalise breaks aim to ease the physical and emotional toll caring can take on carers.

Results 11 - 20 of 33

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