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Results for 'case studies'

Results 1 - 10 of 92

10 tips to help your project reduce loneliness

KAZIMIRSKI Anne, ABRAMS Thomas, MAN Michelle
2019

This guide shares insights from the existing evidence base on promising approaches to delivering programmes to combat loneliness. It focuses on how services are delivered, rather than what they deliver, and provides tips on what is more likely to make interventions effective. The tips are grouped into four themes which cover: Involving users; Building new relationships; Reducing stigma; and Reducing barriers to access. It includes advice on: working with volunteers, building on local assets and strengths, using language carefully, focussing on the neighbourhood, facilitating transport, and using digital technology. Warnings are included where there are common pitfalls. Short practice examples and a list of additional resources are also included.

Briefing for the Cross-Party Group on Arts and Health

WELSH NHS CONFEDERATION
2019

Arts-based projects provide innovative, person-centred approaches to improving the health and wellbeing of the population. This briefing provides case studies to show how NHS organisations and others are working together use arts based initiatives to tackle loneliness and isolation in Wales. They include The Remote Choir, which allows people to participate from the comfort of their own homes; a Hidden Talents is a creative music project for adults who live with learning disabilities; and Story Care and Share which brings together lonely and isolated people together through storytelling.

Animal magic: the benefits of being around and caring for animals across care settings

CARE INSPECTORATE
2019

A collection of case studies which show how being around and caring for animals can benefit many children and adults using a range of care services. It shows how animals and pets can enhance the quality of life of children and adults by helping with relaxation, providing companionship, enhancing relationships, providing a positive focus to people's lives, and encouraging people to be active and making them feel happier. Contact with animals can also enhance relationships with their families, their friends and with care professionals - promoting a culture of kindness for people of all ages. The case studies include examples from very sheltered housing support, fostering services, homeless hostels, dementia care, and care homes. Each case study is annotated with details of relevant Scottish Health and Social Care Standards (Dignity and respect, Compassion, Be included, Responsive care and support, and Wellbeing) and Getting it Right for Every Child (GIRFEC) wellbeing indicators that apply to the example.

Raising the bar on strength and balance: the importance of community-based provision

CENTRE FOR AGEING BETTER
2019

This report draws on work from the University of Manchester Healthy Ageing Research Group, which worked with communities to better understand the challenges of delivering strength and balance programmes for older adults in the local community. These activities could include resistance training, aerobics classes and yoga groups. The report argues that NHS falls rehabilitation services often don’t have the funding or ability to provide sufficient strength and balance programmes to meet existing needs, which means an effective community-based response is essential. The report presents different models of delivery of community-based activities, barriers to delivery and examples of innovative solutions identified during the project. The findings cover five themes: raising awareness, encouraging uptake, exercise referral pathways that work, sticking to the evidence, and monitoring for outcomes and improvements. Each theme highlights five key points to ensure that strength and balance exercise programmes are delivered to the right people, at the right time, and by the right people, so that older adults achieve positive results. Recommendations for commissioners, providers and health care professionals are also included. These include for NHS and local authorities support evidence-based programmes and for improved collaboration between those referring people to programmes and those delivering them.

'What would life be: without a song or a dance, what are we?' A report from the Commission on Dementia and Music

BOWELL Sally, BAMFORD Sally-Marie
2018

This report examines the current landscape of using therapeutic music with people with dementia, outlines the value and benefits of music therapy, and looks at what needs to be done to ensure that everyone with dementia is able to access music. Informed by the Commission on Dementia and Music, the report brings together a wide range of evidence, including academic papers, written and oral evidence, and evidence from site visits. The evidence shows that music can help to minimise symptoms of dementia, such as agitation and can help tackle anxiety and depression. Evidence also shows that music can help improves the quality of life for people with dementia by increasing social interaction and decreasing stress. The report also shows that although the dementia and music environment is supported by a dedicated network of individuals and organisations, they work in a complex and poorly coordinate system. The field is also defined by sporadic access, with only relatively few people with dementia having access. It concludes that the sector would benefit from increased funding, further cost-effective research to boost recognition and funding, and increased public awareness about the benefits of music. The report includes recommendations to help improve access to music for people with dementia.

A mixed methods case study exploring the impact of membership of a multi-activity, multicentre community group on social wellbeing of older adults

LINDSAY-SMITH Gabrielle, et al
2018

Background: Social wellbeing factors such as loneliness and social support have a major impact on the health of older adults and can contribute to physical and mental wellbeing. However, with increasing age, social contacts and social support typically decrease and levels of loneliness increase. Group social engagement appears to have additional benefits for the health of older adults compared to socialising individually with friends and family, but further research is required to confirm whether group activities can be beneficial for the social wellbeing of older adults. Methods: This one-year longitudinal mixed methods study investigated the effect of joining a community group, offering a range of social and physical activities, on social wellbeing of adults with a mean age of 70. The study combined a quantitative survey assessing loneliness and social support (n = 28; three time-points, analysed using linear mixed models) and a qualitative focus group study (n = 11, analysed using thematic analysis) of members from Life Activities Clubs Victoria, Australia. Results: There was a significant reduction in loneliness (p = 0.023) and a trend toward an increase in social support (p = 0.056) in the first year after joining. The focus group confirmed these observations and suggested that social support may take longer than 1 year to develop. Focus groups also identified that group membership provided important opportunities for developing new and diverse social connections through shared interest and experience. These connections were key in improving the social wellbeing of members, especially in their sense of feeling supported or connected and less lonely. Participants agreed that increasing connections was especially beneficial following significant life events such as retirement, moving to a new house or partners becoming unwell. Conclusions: Becoming a member of a community group offering social and physical activities may improve social wellbeing in older adults, especially following significant life events such as retirement or moving-house, where social network changes. These results indicate that ageing policy and strategies would benefit from encouraging long-term participation in social groups to assist in adapting to changes that occur in later life and optimise healthy ageing.

Residents and volunteers: sharing the learning

ABBEYFIELD SOCIETY, AVISON Tracey Berridge, JARVIS Sunnie
2018

This good practice guide shares some of the practical learning from those involved in the Residents as Volunteers project, which supported older people aged over-75 years living in a residential home setting to volunteer. The project was delivered in partnership by Abbeyfield Society and NCVO, and funded by the Big Lottery fund. The guide summarises some of the emotional, social, mental and physical health benefits for residents involved in the project. It then provides advice for getting residents and staff ready to take part in volunteering initiatives; provides ideas to help overcome barriers to volunteering; and ways of identifying volunteering opportunities both inside and outside the home. Case studies from three sites who took part in the Residents as Volunteers project are included: Drake Lodge, Abbeyfield Tavistock Society, Abbeyfield The Dales Society, and Abbeyfield Retirement Living in Nottingham are also included.

Adapting for ageing: good practice and innovation in home adaptations

ADAMS Sue, HODGES Martin
2018

This report identifies examples of high-quality and innovative practice in the provision of home adaptations for older people and looks at key factors which constitute good practice. It draws on the results of a 'call for practice' from Care and Repair England to identify examples from local areas that are organising and delivering adaptations effectively. The report looks at why home adaptations are important and the evidence for them, what good and poor practice looks like, enablers and barriers to innovation and improvement; and what could help drive wider uptake of good practice. The report identifies a number of key features which could ensure an excellent home adaption service. These include: raising awareness of what is possible amongst older people and professionals, including the availability and benefits of home adaptations; helping older people navigate the system to access adaptations advice, funding, practical help and related services; speedy delivery of home adaptations; involving older people in home adaptation service design; including home adaptations in strategic planning; integration of home adaptations with health and care; linking adaptations with home repairs; working with handyperson services; involving social housing providers in adaptation provision; and taking a preventative approach.

TEC stories: how technology enabled care has transformed people's lives

TSA, THINK LOCAL ACT PERSONAL, ASSOCIATION OF DIRECTORS OF ADULT SOCIAL SERVICES
2018

This publication presents 10 individual stories which show how technology enabled care is transforming people’s lives. The stories are told from the individual’s perspective, using their experiences and their own unique circumstances to communicate what technology enabled care means to them. It shows how people are using technology from apps to smart sensors to enhance their independence, better manage long-term health conditions and enable a better quality of life. They include examples of how technology can help to tackle loneliness, provide reminders for people living with dementia, help children in local authority care to make their voices heard and help people to keep in touch with their friends. By giving a voice to people who are already using a wide range of technology, this resource offers political leaders, commissioners and practitioners a case for change.

Evaluation of Ageing Better in Birmingham year two report

MORETON Rachel, et al
2018

Evaluation of Ageing Better in Birmingham, part of a wider programme of 14 Ageing Better projects located across England taking an asset-based approach to tackle social isolation and loneliness in older people. The evaluation covers activities completed between May 2017 and April 2018. It reports on the range of activities delivered, which included exercise and arts activities; key characteristics of successful activity; how networks are working to make their activities sustainable; and the ways in which activities are attracting male participants. Short case studies of the groups delivered are included throughout. Key findings show that Ageing Better in Birmingham is successfully engaging ethnically and age diverse participants and older adults who are the most-lonely. This has been achieved by mainly working through established voluntary and community groups, which it is noted may not always effective in those areas where the voluntary and community sector is less well developed. The evaluation found Network Leads play an important role in making a successful Network and that Networks involving physical activity appear to be associated with greater wellbeing gains for participants. The report makes recommendations for the future development of the programme.

Results 1 - 10 of 92

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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