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Results for 'case studies'

Results 1 - 10 of 98

Going the extra step: a compendium of best practice in dementia care. Preventing unwanted isolation and loneliness for people with dementia living in housing with care

TWYFORD Katey, WELLS Wendy
2019

A collection of examples of extra care schemes and other housing related community services that support people with dementia to develop meaningful relationships, helping to reduce social isolation and loneliness. They include examples of personalised support that can be arranged for residents; examples of groups and social activities; and different organisational and community-based approaches that have been adopted. The examples range from informal arrangements supported by staff or other residents to formal service provision.

The best of both worlds: a closer look at creating spaces that connect young and old

GOYER Amy
2019

This report explores the barriers and opportunities to the development and expansion of intergenerational shared sites, focusing on the experience of sites in the United States. It builds on an earlier report 'All In Together', which identified the positive benefits that intergenerational shared sites could have for older people, young people and children. Interviews with staff and board members at intergenerational shared sites, national policy and program experts identified four key phases in the development and operation of shared sites. These are: Creating the vision, which included nurturing champions and building partnerships; Making it work, from finding resources to designing the space to navigating regulations; Building intergenerational relationships; and Maintaining momentum. The report discusses each of these phases and strategies to address them, drawing on practice from the shared sites. It is hoped that by developing a better understanding of these pivotal phases, organisations and communities will be able to make further progress and further develop intergenerational shared sites.

Bringing people together: how community action can tackle loneliness and social isolation

ANDERSON Zoe, et al
2019

Learning and examples from a range of community and voluntary sector projects tackling social isolation and loneliness in the UK. Drawing on the work of charities, the report considers the causes of loneliness, looks at 'what works' to prevent it and suggests ways to offer support to those who are isolated or lonely. Preventative initiatives include giving something back through volunteering, helping people to take on new interests, and investing in community spaces to help people share interests together. Examples to support those who are lonely or isolated include giving people choices in how to get involved and to make steps manageable, simple solutions such as befriending and peer support, tailoring solutions for different age groups, and using technology such as such as social media and computer tablets to widen access to support. The report shows that supporting people to improve their mindset, building new connections with others, building confidence and developing a new sense of purpose, can have a big impact in reducing feelings of loneliness and isolation. The report is based on interviews with funded organisations and staff in The National Lottery Community Fund staff.

Embedding community circles in support for older people living in residential care homes or extra care: a practical resource

ROUTLEDGE Martin, BARTON Cath, WILTON Sharon
2019

Based upon the first two years of experience developing Community Circles in Wigan, this resource shares learning and progress to date. It also outlines the key roles and activities to consider when setting up Community Circles in residential care homes and extra care housing. It will be useful for anyone wanting to include Community Circles as part of the offer of support for older people in residential care or extra care. It will also be of wider use to those looking to embed a range of person and community centred approaches in these types of support. Links to additional guides, reports, tools and materials are included throughout.

Review of key mechanisms in intergenerational practices, and their effectiveness at reducing loneliness/social isolation

BRYER Nia, OWNES Janine
2019

This review examines enablers and barriers to successful intergenerational activities and interventions effectiveness at reducing loneliness and social isolation. It also examines whether there are particular subgroups for whom intergenerational programmes are particularly effective. The review was carried out by researchers at OB3 Research and the Centre for Loneliness Studies at University of Sheffield. It included a literature review, and field work to identify intergenerational interventions and case studies from Wales and the wider UK. The review identified a range of interventions from low level interventions such as raising awareness of ageing issues through to high level intervention where intergenerational activities are embedded into community settings. The findings also indicate that intergenerational practice does more to reduce social isolation and lack of social connections than loneliness. The review identified different benefits for the three groups involved - children/young people, adults and older people. The review also identified a number of enablers that contribute to effective operation of IP (e.g. a visionary leader, a focused perspective) and barriers that hinder action (e.g. time, planning, logistics). The review makes eight recommendations for the Welsh Government to consider in terms of future policy relating to intergenerational practice.

Social infrastructure: how shared spaces make communities work

YARKER Sophie
2019

This report, from the Ambition for Ageing project, identifies how social infrastructure in neighbourhoods can promote social interaction and reduce social isolation for older people. Social infrastructure provides spaces and opportunities for people to have social interactions and build connections. The report argues there needs to be a diversity of social infrastructure to support different types and levels of social connection, and considers the importance of the connections made between diverse groups of people - also known as bridging capital. It also looks at the types of social infrastructure that facilitate this, which tend to be places that the majority of the community would have the opportunity to visit, such as public libraries, cafes and parks and open public spaces. Key points include: that shared spaces within neighbourhoods are vital for reducing social isolation for older people; that different kinds of social infrastructure help support different types and levels of social capital; and the need for social infrastructure that supports intergenerational and intercultural encounters. Despite its often informal nature, social infrastructure is not naturally occurring and therefore The report highlights the need for direct investment and support to help the development of the social infrastructure and the creation of third places.

10 tips to help your project reduce loneliness

KAZIMIRSKI Anne, ABRAMS Thomas, MAN Michelle
2019

This guide shares insights from the existing evidence base on promising approaches to delivering programmes to combat loneliness. It focuses on how services are delivered, rather than what they deliver, and provides tips on what is more likely to make interventions effective. The tips are grouped into four themes which cover: Involving users; Building new relationships; Reducing stigma; and Reducing barriers to access. It includes advice on: working with volunteers, building on local assets and strengths, using language carefully, focussing on the neighbourhood, facilitating transport, and using digital technology. Warnings are included where there are common pitfalls. Short practice examples and a list of additional resources are also included.

Briefing for the Cross-Party Group on Arts and Health

WELSH NHS CONFEDERATION
2019

Arts-based projects provide innovative, person-centred approaches to improving the health and wellbeing of the population. This briefing provides case studies to show how NHS organisations and others are working together use arts based initiatives to tackle loneliness and isolation in Wales. They include The Remote Choir, which allows people to participate from the comfort of their own homes; a Hidden Talents is a creative music project for adults who live with learning disabilities; and Story Care and Share which brings together lonely and isolated people together through storytelling.

Animal magic: the benefits of being around and caring for animals across care settings

CARE INSPECTORATE
2019

A collection of case studies which show how being around and caring for animals can benefit many children and adults using a range of care services. It shows how animals and pets can enhance the quality of life of children and adults by helping with relaxation, providing companionship, enhancing relationships, providing a positive focus to people's lives, and encouraging people to be active and making them feel happier. Contact with animals can also enhance relationships with their families, their friends and with care professionals - promoting a culture of kindness for people of all ages. The case studies include examples from very sheltered housing support, fostering services, homeless hostels, dementia care, and care homes. Each case study is annotated with details of relevant Scottish Health and Social Care Standards (Dignity and respect, Compassion, Be included, Responsive care and support, and Wellbeing) and Getting it Right for Every Child (GIRFEC) wellbeing indicators that apply to the example.

Raising the bar on strength and balance: the importance of community-based provision

CENTRE FOR AGEING BETTER
2019

This report draws on work from the University of Manchester Healthy Ageing Research Group, which worked with communities to better understand the challenges of delivering strength and balance programmes for older adults in the local community. These activities could include resistance training, aerobics classes and yoga groups. The report argues that NHS falls rehabilitation services often don’t have the funding or ability to provide sufficient strength and balance programmes to meet existing needs, which means an effective community-based response is essential. The report presents different models of delivery of community-based activities, barriers to delivery and examples of innovative solutions identified during the project. The findings cover five themes: raising awareness, encouraging uptake, exercise referral pathways that work, sticking to the evidence, and monitoring for outcomes and improvements. Each theme highlights five key points to ensure that strength and balance exercise programmes are delivered to the right people, at the right time, and by the right people, so that older adults achieve positive results. Recommendations for commissioners, providers and health care professionals are also included. These include for NHS and local authorities support evidence-based programmes and for improved collaboration between those referring people to programmes and those delivering them.

Results 1 - 10 of 98

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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