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Results for 'commissioning'

Results 1 - 10 of 54

Handyperson services: defining the added value

FOUNDATIONS
2020

This report highlights the role of Handyperson Services in keeping people safe and healthy in their own homes. It looks at some of the main improvements services can carry out, which can include repairs, home safety checks and home adaptations. It also provides examples of services that provide added value. These include: Middlesbrough Staying Put, County Durham Handyperson Service and Manchester Care & Repair. Figures from a sample survey completed by 78 local authorities in England show that over half of local authorities either provide or commission handyperson services, with 45 percent providing services that aid timely discharge from hospital. The report concludes that the inclusion of Disabled Facilities Grant in the Better Care Fund provides a mechanism to improve the commissioning and targeting of Handyperson Services.

The older adults’ NHS and social care return on investment tool: final report

PUBLIC HEALTH ENGLAND
2020

This report summarises the evidence on nine identified interventions to support older people. It is the final report of a project to provide a return on investment (ROI) tool to help stakeholders and decision-makers to compare the cost-effectiveness of interventions to reduce the need for services in older adults. The focus is on the use of social care services, but the report also reviews interventions which also reduced the need for health services. The ROI includes nine interventions, identified though a literature review. They are: community singing; a help at home scheme; a befriending service; the WHELD intervention for people living with dementia in nursing home; the INTERCOM intervention providing hospital discharge support for COPD patients; voluntary and community sector (VCS) services aimed at patients with long-term conditions, which use social prescribing and other approaches to put patients in touch with services; health coaching; the BELLA intervention providing self-management support for COPD patients; and a home care reablement service. An accompanying technical report provides further detail of the literature review, selection of the interventions for inclusion in the tool and the modelling methods. The return investment tool is available to download. It can be adapted to local conditions and presents results showing the economic benefits of each intervention.

Commissioning for health and well-being: an introduction

GLASBY Jon
2012

Commissioning is now a key task for health and social care. While commissioning was important under New Labour, it seems set to be even more fundamental now as commissioners have to make decisions about future services in an era of austerity. This book explores what commissioning is, where it has come from, and where it might be going. It comprises a compilation of separate papers from a wide range of experts from fields including health care, social care, and local government. The book starts with an overview of policy and the history of commissioning. The next group of chapters takes the reader through key stages of the commissioning cycle, considering issues such as decision making and priority setting, procurement and market management, commissioning for service resilience, and commissioning for quality and outcomes. The final 4 chapters pick up on cross-cutting themes, such as the economics of commissioning, user involvement, joint commissioning and commissioning in an era of personalisation. The book is likely to be of interest to everyone involved in the planning and delivery of health and social care including social policy students, health and social care practitioners, managers and policy makers.

Evidence, insight, or intuition? Investment decisions in the commissioning of prevention services for older people

MILLER Robin, et al
2013

English adult social care commissioners are expected to make ‘evidence based’ decisions on how best to invest public sector funding. This study explores the types of evidence that commissioners use in relation to prevention services for older people and the other factors that influence their investment decisions. A study of local authority Directors of Adult Social Services (DASSs) was used to identify three local prevention interventions. Semi-structured interviews with leads for these interventions explored the evidence and other factors that influenced the investment process. Commissioners drew on a variety of published evidence, in particular that deriving from central government and its regional representative bodies, and third sector organizations with specialist knowledge. Local evidence was also generated through the undertaking of pilots and gathering of performance data. Alongside these ‘rational’ decision-making processes were strong political, personal, and relational dimensions related primarily to the influence of elected members and the hierarchical power of DASSs. Capturing experiential evidence and knowledge of service users and frontline practitioners, being clear about expected impacts and monitoring accordingly, and using recognized evaluation tools would provide further local evidence and enable better comparison and sharing across local authorities.

Public mental health: evidence, practice and commissioning

CAMPION Jonathan
2019

Based on a review of recent literature, this report summarises evidence around public mental health practice. Public mental health practice takes a population approach to mental health which includes three levels of mental disorder prevention and mental wellbeing promotion. The review covers: the impact of mental health problems and of mental wellbeing; risk factors for mental disorder and protective factors for mental wellbeing; groups at higher risk of poor mental health; effective interventions to treat mental disorder and to prevent associated impacts, preventing mental disorder from arising and promoting mental wellbeing; and economic savings of different public mental health interventions. It finds that despite the existence of cost-effective public mental health interventions, only a minority of people with a mental condition in England receive any treatment, receive interventions to prevent associated impacts or receive intervention to prevent mental conditions or promote mental wellbeing. It sets out a number of actions to improve coverage of evidence based interventions to reduce the population impact of mental disorder and promote population mental wellbeing. The report has been endorsed by the Association of Directors of Public Health, Faculty of Public Health, Health Education England, Local Government Association, Royal College of General Practitioners, Royal College of Psychiatrists and RSPH (Royal Society of Public Health).

Community commissioning: shaping public services through people power

LENT Adam, STUDDERT Jessica, WALKER Trinley
2019

This report argues that if there is to be a move to a preventative system in public services, communities need to take on more responsibility for their own health and well-being. The report makes the case for why the process of commissioning of public services needs to be led by citizens and service users, not public sector professionals. It also explains in detail how this shift is happening in practice. The report suggests four key questions that public sector organisations need to consider when moving to a model of community commissioning: the nature of the service - will it be a statutory or non-core service; the nature of the commissioning network - will it be open to all residents within a geographical area only to those with a particular need or interest; the method of power transfer - formal or informal; and the depth of participation. It includes recommendations for central government that would help bring about this transfer of power to communities in the commissioning process.

A toolkit to support the commissioning of targeted preventative services: South West regional commissioning

SOUTH WEST JOINT IMPROVEMENT PARTNERSHIP
2010

This toolkit was developed by the Institute of Public Care to help commissioners of adult social care and health services in the South West of England target prevention and early intervention services more effectively, given the prospect of severely limited resources and a significant projected rise in the region’s population of older people. With reduced expenditure per head therefore available, the toolkit aims to help local authorities assess existing services, identify shortcomings, and contribute to the development of new, more effective preventative services. There is a particular focus on identifying individuals likely to come to rely on high-intensity, high-cost services while they are still divertible from that path. This toolkit includes a series of tools templates and performance information frameworks that will help local authorities in the South West and their partners to: develop a more refined framework for understanding the distribution of prevention, early intervention, intervention and substitute support services; analyse the distribution of current services for older people across levels of need and identify where greater targeting of those in need might be effective; and plan how to refocus where greater targeting of those in need might be most effective.

Social prescribing and community-based support: summary guide

NHS ENGLAND
2019

A guide provides best practice advice for people and organisations leading local implementation of social prescribing. It describes what good social prescribing looks like and how it can improve outcomes for people, their families and carers, as well as achieving more value from the system. It considers what needs to be in place locally to implement social prescribing, commission local social prescribing connector schemes and enable agencies refer people with wider social needs to community-based support. It will enable collaborative working amongst local partners at a ‘place-based’ local level, to recognise the value of community groups and assets and to enable people to build or rebuild friendships, community connections and a sense of belonging, as well as accessing existing services. Includes a draft job description and person specification for a Social prescribing link worker.

Developing peer support in the community: a toolkit

SIDE BY SIDE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM
2017

A toolkit to help people to plan and run mental health peer support in the community. The toolkit will be especially useful for those wanting to set up new projects or those involved in commissioning peer support. It outlines the three main approaches to community-based peer support and lists a core set of values underpinning peer support, and make it different from other forms of mental health support. It also looks at how peer support might be organised and provides guidance on how to better understand and communicate the impact of groups. Sections of the toolkit include reflection questions and activities which were developed alongside more than 10 groups and projects. Links to useful resources are included. The toolkit is based upon research undertaken by the Side by Side evaluation partners, which included St George’s, University of London, the McPin Foundation, and the London School of Economics.

Evaluating the Side by Side peer support programme

BILLSBOROUGH Julie, et al
2017

An evaluation of the Side by Side programme, which aimed to increase the availability and quality of community based peer support for people experiencing mental health problems across England. The programme was led by the mental health charity Mind, in collaboration with Depression Alliance and Bipolar UK. The evaluation covered four areas: developing and testing a set of values and principles for peer support; examining the effectiveness of peer support, including changes in wellbeing; building capacity for peer support; and commissioning peer support. It also explored how peer support took place within Side by Side projects specifically aimed at peers from a Black and Minority Ethnic background. The evaluation found that peer support was valued and helpful to people involved. It also identified six core values that appeared to underpin all forms of peer support - experience in common, safety, choice and control, two way interactions, human connection, and freedom to be oneself. The findings suggest that peer support enabled people to recover a sense of personal agency and usefulness, which was beneficial to their wellbeing. The evaluation also suggests that peer support works best where commissioners, provider organisations and communities work together to develop a range of approaches to peer support and where people are enabled to take control of how and when they engage with the peer support. The evaluation team was a partnership that included a mental health research team from St George’s, University of London, the McPin Foundation.

Results 1 - 10 of 54

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
View more: News
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