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Find prevention records by subject or service provider/commissioner name

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Results for 'commissioning'

Results 31 - 36 of 36

Technical guide: building a business case for prevention

SOCIAL FINANCE
2014

This guide sets out the issues that need to be considered when developing a business case to invest in preventive services and to ensure that any decision are based on robust and reliable data. The guide focuses on the following arguments: the importance of 'investing to save', arguing that prevention is cheaper in the long term; promotion of service innovation; placing the focus of commissioning on outcomes rather than outputs; and managing a shift in spending from acute to prevention to reduce demand over time. The guide outlines key four activities required to build a business case: understanding needs; understanding current costs; assessing possible interventions; and deciding how to measure the value and outcome of the interventions. It also provides a summary business case for prevention and using a Social Impact Bond (SBI) to finance a business case for prevention. An example case study of making a business case for prevention services in early years services in Greater Manchester is included.

Promising returns: a commissioners guide to investing in mentoring and befriending programmes

MENTORING AND BEFRIENDING FOUNDATION
2012

This guide aims to give an overview of the range, diversity and positive impact of mentoring and befriending activity. Using case studies and programme examples, it outlines a range of mentoring and befriending approaches and identifies the key potential outcomes, including reduced offending, improved community cohesion, improved access to employment, reduced social isolation, higher aspirations and increased independence. The document also explains how the Mentoring and Befriending Foundation can support commissioners identify effective programmes.

Beginning with the end in mind: how outcomes-based commissioning can help unlock the potential of community services

NHS CONFEDERATION. Community Health Services Forum
2014

Explains outcomes-based commissioning and outlines how it might help enable service transformation. Outcomes-based commissioning incentivises high-value interventions, shifting resources to services in the community, a focus on keeping people healthy and in their own homes, delivering outcomes that matter to people using the services, and coordinated care. It discusses the opportunities that outcomes-based commissioning gives for providers of community services, including the main technical considerations that will need to be addressed. Health outcomes have become the standard for measuring successful care. More and more people are living with long-term, and often multiple, conditions. This briefing argues that successful care for this group of people is not about providing a cure or a certain number of procedures, but about enabling and supporting them to live as well as possible with their conditions over the long term. Achieving this will involve transforming the system so that all of its parts work in an integrated way towards the outcomes people want and need most. Unlocking the unmet potential in community settings is crucial in both transforming care and improving efficiency. The briefing includes practical examples showcasing how community providers are using innovative ways of supporting and enabling people with high levels of clinical need to be cared for at home or more locally, and are working in partnership with other health and care providers. It will be of interest to all commissioners and providers considering developing an outcomes-based commissioning approach that includes community health services. It is particularly relevant to providers of community services.

Reablement: key issues for commissioners of adult social care

SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE, ASSOCIATION OF DIRECTORS OF ADULT SOCIAL SERVICES
2012

A short briefing paper which outlines research and practice evidence about reablement and describes what is required for successful implementation. Sections cover: setting up a reablement service, tips for commissioners, key considerations in providing an efficient and cost effective service. It also presents two case examples of the impact reablement can have on the population and on local authority budgets. Links are provided to freely available evidence and information.

Singing from the same hymn sheet? commissioning of preventative services from the third sector

MILLER Robin, et al
2013

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the delivery of preventative services for older people from third sector organisations (TSOs) and the extent to which current commissioning arrangements enables the aspirations of policy to be achieved. Design/methodology/approach: Semi-structured interviews with key-contacts within a sample of TSOs which had been identified by directors of Adult Social Services as delivering one of the top three preventative interventions in their local authority area. Findings: There was evidence of considerable trust between local authorities and TSOs and as a consequence TSOs were given autonomy to develop holistic and integrated models of delivery that supported rather than diverted the TSOs’ core missions. Both sectors found it difficult to set target outcomes and connected performance frameworks for preventative services. As a consequence a major element of the commissioning cycle is not being completed and TSOs cannot be confident that they are using their resources as effectively as possible. Research limitations/implications: This study was based in one English region, and would benefit from being extended to other English regions and home nations. Practical implications: Universities, policy makers, commissioners and the third sector need to work together to develop common outcome frameworks for preventative services and to gather consistent data sets that can be more easily synthesised to give a “realistic” understanding of the impact of different interventions and delivery models. Originality value: The paper contributes to the limited evidence bases of commissioning of TSOs and preventative services.

The economic impact of care in the home services: a report commissioned by the British Red Cross

DELOITTE
2012

This study estimates the economic benefits to commissioners of both health and social care across six British Red Cross schemes, two covering A&E hospital schemes, and four focused on community and individual resilience. Based on analysing these six schemes, BRC is found to be delivering substantial savings to health and social care commissioners, ranging from £168 to £704 per user relating to a rate of return between 40 to 280 per cent. Savings are realised through the prevention of hospital admission or reduced length of stay in hospital; reduced levels of hospital readmission; and preventing or minimising the use of expensive domiciliary and residential care. All the BRC schemes across the UK are estimated to have the potential to save commissioners £8m. This saving implies an overall return of 149 per cent on commissioner expenditure, suggesting that these schemes deliver material benefits and form a crucial element of care in the UK. In addition to savings there are a number of further benefits the schemes deliver, including service user benefits, signposting and assistance with access to additional services, reduction of social isolation and greater independence and wellbeing through the use of volunteers.

Results 31 - 36 of 36

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