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Results for 'communities'

Results 1 - 10 of 40

The four essential elements of an asset-based community development process

McKNIGHT John, RUSSELL Cormac
2018

This paper provides an overview of Asset-Based Community Development (ABCD) and discusses the four essential elements of the (ABCD) process that make it distinct from other approaches. The paper describes these as: resources - the assets that communities create but services so often ignore, such as individual resident contributions, local groups and the natural and built environment; methods - the assumption that communities can and should drive change themselves; functions - the essential functions that communities can perform for themselves, such as enabling health, shaping local economies, and co-recreating; and evaluation - the questions that can be used to evaluate an ABCD process and assess the effectiveness of community life.

A connected society. A strategy for tackling loneliness: laying the foundations for change

GREAT BRITAIN. Her Majesty's Government
2018

This strategy builds on the work of the Jo Cox Commission on Loneliness and sets out the government's approach to tackling loneliness in England. The strategy highlights the role that everyone can play in tackling loneliness, including government, communities and the individual. The government's work on loneliness is guided by three overarching goals: building the evidence base, embedding loneliness as a consideration across government policy, and building a national conversation on loneliness, to raise awareness of its impacts and to help tackle stigma. Chapter one provides a summary of the existing evidence base on loneliness, including its impacts and causes. The following three chapters set out government commitments and partnerships in three areas seen as crucial to build a connected society. These are: organisations and services - how government, working with local authorities, health bodies, businesses and the voluntary sector will introduce a range of new initiatives that enable the everyday services we use to connect those at risk of loneliness to support; community infrastructure – such as accessing community space, transport and well designed housing; and building a culture that encourages strong social relationships – including tackling stigma surrounding loneliness and supporting community groups. Chapter five sets out how government will take this agenda forward and sets out a commitment from the Loneliness Action Group to continue its work until at least the end of 2019. The document highlights examples from practice throughout.

Age-friendly and inclusive volunteering: review of community contributions in later life

JOPLING Kate, JONES Dan
2018

This review considers how to enable more people to contribute to their communities, in later life (defined as aged 50 and over), with a focus on increasing participation among underrepresented groups, especially those in poor health or living with long-term health conditions. It covers activities such as neighbourliness, helping in the community and volunteering. It draws on a range of sources including a call for evidence, a call for practice and seven roundtable meetings involving over 100 participants. The report looks at why people get involved with their communities and how contributing to communities can improve social connections, and lead to increased life satisfaction and wellbeing; how volunteering can change across the life course; and the practical, structural and emotional barriers to contributing to communities. It sets out a framework for age-friendly, inclusive volunteering, which includes for volunteering to: be flexible and to fit around life changes; to provide support and training needed; to provide opportunities to be sociable and feel connected; value volunteers; provide meaningful activity; and make good use of strengths and experiences. The review makes recommendations for the voluntary, public and private sectors on how to tackle the barriers to enable people to continue to volunteer throughout their lifetime. Case studies of good practice are included throughout the report.

Connecting communities to tackle loneliness and social isolation: learning report

JOPLING Kate, HOWELLS Anna
2018

Summarises findings from a learning programme, looking at how connector services across the UK help reconnect people who are experiencing loneliness back to their communities. The learning events enabled detailed conversations between service providers, and provided an opportunity to share and reflect on challenges facing services. Four common challenges emerged: reaching those most in need; connecting people; knowing what interventions are out there; and measuring outcomes. While there is no easy solution to any of these, the report outlines possible approaches for overcoming these barriers, including: linking with health professionals can be helpful in reaching the most isolated people; go to everyday places such as supermarkets, libraries, pubs, taxi services; adopting an asset-based approach to working with individuals; using local knowledge and connections to find the right support for people in all their diversity; and ensuring frontline staff have access to training and support to use measurement tools effectively.

The association between physical activity and social isolation in community-dwelling older adults

ROBINS Lauren M., et al
2018

Objectives: Social isolation is an increasing concern in older community-dwelling adults. There is growing need to determine effective interventions addressing social isolation. This study aimed to determine whether a relationship exists between physical activity (recreational and/or household-based) and social isolation. An examination was conducted for whether group- or home-based falls prevention exercise was associated with social isolation. Methods: Cross-sectional analysis of telephone survey data was used to investigate relationships between physical activity, health, age, gender, living arrangements, ethnicity and participation in group- or home-based falls prevention exercise on social isolation. Univariable and multivariable ordered logistic regression analyses were conducted. Results: Factors found to be significantly associated with reduced social isolation in multivariable analysis included living with a partner/spouse, reporting better general health, higher levels of household-based physical activity (OR = 1.03, CI = 1.01–1.05) and feeling less downhearted/depressed. Being more socially isolated was associated with symptoms of depression and a diagnosis of congestive heart failure (pseudo R2 = 0.104). Discussion: Findings suggest that household-based physical activity is related to social isolation in community-dwelling older adults. Further research is required to determine the nature of this relationship and to investigate the impact of group physical activity interventions on social isolation.

Health matters: community-centred approaches for health and wellbeing

PUBLIC HEALTH ENGLAND
2018

This resource focuses on the concept and practice of community-centred approaches for health and wellbeing and outlines how to create the conditions for community assets to thrive. It looks at the benefits of working with communities, in terms of improved outcomes and potential savings. It also outlines the range of community-centred approaches that can be used to improve community health and wellbeing. These include initiatives to strengthen communities; volunteering and peer support; collaborations and partnerships; and access to community resources. It highlights evidence, key policy documents and includes links to resources and case studies.

Building bridges: bringing councils, communities and independent funders into dialogue

GILBERT Abigail
2017

This report highlights the need for collaboration between local organisations and local government in order to secure the wellbeing of communities at a time of increasing pressure facing local government budgets and increasing demand for services. The report found that councils need to work more closely with other funders of civil society, and communities, to enable change. It shows that effective collaboration between independent funders and local government can result in more intelligent, inclusive commissioning, more innovation at scale, better distribution and use of assets within localities, and more participation and engagement with communities. It also identifies potential barriers to collaboration, which include: a lack of a shared sense of purpose; a lack of consensus on what effective prevention looks like; and both councils and funders wanting to maintain their independence and reputation. The report makes a number of recommendations to improve collaboration. These include: for local authorities to have a senior officer responsible for developing funding; for elected members to building bridges between the council and independent funders; and for independent funders, such as charitable trusts, to work collaboratively with councils in order to define what ‘good’ service delivery looks like. Although the evidence for this report is focused on London, many of the findings and messages will be relevant to a wider audience.

Understanding local needs for wellbeing data measures and indicators

BROWN Helen, ADBALLAH Saamah, TOWNSELY Ruth
2017

This report presents a new Local Wellbeing Indicator set for local authorities, public health leaders and Health and Wellbeing boards to help local decision-makers better understand the wellbeing of their local populations, and how they can act to improve it. The set is the product of a six-month scoping project co-commissioned by the Office for National Statistics (ON) and Public Health England (PHE), in collaboration with the What Works Centre for Wellbeing and Happy City. The report outlines the rationale for the selection of indicators, details the methodology used, and presents the indicators. The final framework consists of an ‘ideal’ set and a ‘currently available’ set of Local Wellbeing indicators, recognising that some of the indicators proposed in the ideal set are not yet available at the local authority level. The ‘ideal’ set is based on a core of 26 indicators of individual wellbeing and its determinants. The ‘currently available’ set contains 23 indicators. Both the ‘ideal’ and ‘currently available’ sets are built around seven domains: personal wellbeing, economy, education and childhood, equality, health, place and social relationships. The report also includes recommendations for additional ‘deeper dive’ support indicators that provide more detailed insight in specific areas and contexts. The indicators aim to meet the need for a practical local translation of the Measuring National Wellbeing programme Office, introduced by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) in 2011.

Enabling change through communities of practice: Wellbeing Our Way

KOUSSA Natalie
2017

Summarises learning from a National Voices programme, Wellbeing Our Way, which aimed to explore how communities of practice could contribute to large-scale change across the health and care voluntary and community sector. The programme brought together people from charities, community organisations and people with experience of using health and care services to enable people to increase their knowledge and skills around a range of person- and community-centred approaches. The report provides an overview and learning from the national communities of practice and from two place-based communities of practice in Greater Manchester, which focused on peer support and self-management. Key learning for facilitating change through communities of practice identified includes: the importance of co-design; good facilitation; identifying specific expertise within the community of practice; having a clear area of focus of the community; having a clearly defined goal when looking to enable organisational change; and involving senior leaders to increase the chance of encouraging change. Individuals involved in the programme also explain how it has helped them initiate change in their practice and organisation. Results from the programme evaluation found that 79 per cent of participants were able to increase their knowledge and skills and 64 per cent were enabled, partly enabled, to create change in their organisation.

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