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Results for 'communities'

Results 1 - 10 of 52

Resilience: understanding the interdependence between individuals and communities

DAVIES Alisha R., et al
2019

Drawing on the results of a literature review, this report brings together evidence on individual and community resilience, and the interdependence between the two. It draws on examples of programmes to strengthen resilience across the life course and in communities, and looks at approaches to measuring change in resilience. The report highlights how people’s sense of wellbeing, how well they cope emotionally, and how they engage socially are the key factors for resilience, which in turn contribute to wider community resilience. Resilient communities can draw on the assets within people, place and wider economic factors. It also finds that resilience is not fixed but changes at different points in peoples' lives. The report highlights a range of activities that improve community and individual resilience, including: encouraging good relationships and connections with others; establishing a healthy family environment and early positive parent-child relationships; promoting good health and mental wellbeing in adulthood, including developing positive relationships and social capital through engaging with the community; and enhancing the resilience of older people though building positive relationships, strengthening social connections and meaningful engagement, alongside enhancing autonomy and independence. It concludes with a summary of the key messages.

Adopt a Care Home: an intergenerational initiative bringing children into care homes

DI BONA Laura, KENNEDY Sheila, MOUNTAIN Gail
2019

Dementia friendly communities, in which people living with dementia actively participate and those around them are educated about dementia, may improve the wellbeing of those living with dementia and reduce the associated stigma. The Adopt a Care Home scheme aims to contribute towards this by teaching schoolchildren about dementia and linking them with people living with dementia in a local care home. Forty-one children, 10 people living with dementia and 8 school/care home staff participated in a mixed methods (questionnaires, observations, interviews and focus groups) evaluation to assess the scheme’s feasibility and impact. Data were analysed statistically and thematically. The scheme was successfully implemented, increased children’s dementia awareness and appeared enjoyable for most participants. Findings, therefore, demonstrate the scheme’s potential to contribute towards dementia friendly communities by increasing children’s knowledge and understanding of dementia and engaging people living with dementia in an enjoyable activity, increasing their social inclusion.

It’s time for Local Area Coordination

COMMUNITY CATALYSTS
2019

The report provides information on the Local Area Coordination and highlights the positive impact it has had on communities in England and Wales. Drawing on the experience of the 11 current members of the Local Area Coordination Network, who are local authorities or health services, the report shares stories to show how the model can: make local communities better places to live; improve the health and wellbeing of local people; integrate health and social care; co-produce change with local people; reform the front door to services; and create social value and reduce costs.

Call&Check: a community service which disrupts the norm

DICKINSON Joe
2019

In this project presentation the author, inventor of Call&Check UK, describes the service which is designed to enable people to live independently and confidently in their own homes. Regular visits are made by a postman/postal operator and who asks five short questions to find out how the recipient is and if there is anything they need. Call&Check works not only for older people in communities but for many others who need that little extra support to live at home.

Bringing people together: how community action can tackle loneliness and social isolation

ANDERSON Zoe, et al
2019

Learning and examples from a range of community and voluntary sector projects tackling social isolation and loneliness in the UK. Drawing on the work of charities, the report considers the causes of loneliness, looks at 'what works' to prevent it and suggests ways to offer support to those who are isolated or lonely. Preventative initiatives include giving something back through volunteering, helping people to take on new interests, and investing in community spaces to help people share interests together. Examples to support those who are lonely or isolated include giving people choices in how to get involved and to make steps manageable, simple solutions such as befriending and peer support, tailoring solutions for different age groups, and using technology such as such as social media and computer tablets to widen access to support. The report shows that supporting people to improve their mindset, building new connections with others, building confidence and developing a new sense of purpose, can have a big impact in reducing feelings of loneliness and isolation. The report is based on interviews with funded organisations and staff in The National Lottery Community Fund staff.

Being well together: the creation of the Co-op Community Wellbeing Index

HILL-DIXON Amanda, SOLLEY Suzanne, BYNON Radhika
2019

This report presents the Co-op Community Wellbeing Index (CWI), the first measure of community wellbeing at a neighbourhood level across the UK. The index aims to help understand what community wellbeing means to people across the UK and what communities need to help people to get involved and make communities stronger. The report outlines the conceptual model, methodology, and evidence it is based on. Based on the findings from a literature review and research with communities, a model of community wellbeing was developed, which underpins the Community Wellbeing Index. In the model is based on three key pillars: people, place, and relationships. Within these three pillars there are 9 domains of community wellbeing: relationships and trust; equality; voice and participation; health; education and learning; economy, work and employment; culture, leisure and heritage; housing, space and environment; and transport, mobility and connectivity. The complete Index includes an explanation which reflects the aspirations of communities for each domain and related indicators. The report has been written for anybody interested in community wellbeing and will be of particular interest to community sector organisations and practitioners, policymakers, researchers, and funders.

Heritage and wellbeing. The impact of historic places and assets on community wellbeing: a scoping review

PENNINGTON Andy, et al
2019

A scoping review of evidence on the impact of heritage places, interventions, and assets – things like historic objects, monuments or buildings – to discover how they impact individual and community wellbeing. The primary focus of the review was on impacts of historic places and assets set within the ‘living environment’ of communities, but it also considers evidence from projects that used historic objects/artefacts, for example, in the care of people with dementia in care homes and other healthcare settings. The review looked at 75 papers and reports. It found higher and lower quality evidence that historic places, assets and associated activities and interventions can have a wide range of beneficial impacts on the physical, mental and social wellbeing of individuals and communities. These include increased life satisfaction and social connectivity for individuals and positive effects on community wellbeing such as social relationships, sense of belonging, pride of place, ownership and collective empowerment. It also identifies important gaps in the research, and highlights potential negative wellbeing impacts of participating in heritage-based interventions, or living in historic areas. Potential negative impacts of interventions appear to be related to how well the design and delivery of interventions considered the needs of specific individuals and groups.

Systematic review of community business related approaches to health and social care

McCLEAN Stuart, et al
2019

This systematic review identifies evidence in relation to the impact of community business-related approaches to health and social care on outcomes for its users. In particular, the report asks how effective community businesses are in delivering outcomes for their users. In recent years community businesses which are rooted in a local area and led by the local community have emerged in the wider health and social care market to address factors in local communities that may benefit or harm health and wellbeing. The report demonstrates that the available evidence of varying quality and more research is needed. However, it found that community businesses related approaches such as ‘men’s sheds’ initiatives, village models for older people and community farms impact on a range of health and wellbeing outcomes, These include outcomes for social connectedness, self-esteem, physical health, mental wellbeing and quality of life. It concludes that community businesses deliver benefits for users that could be at least as effective as traditional models of health and social care but more research is needed to provide robust and evidence-based comparisons.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme

The Chatty Cafe Scheme supports cafes to designate a 'Chatter & Natter' table where customers can sit if they are happy to talk to other customers. The scheme aims to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together from mums with their babies to older people.

Building age-friendly neighbourhoods in Greater Manchester: evidence from the Ambition for Ageing programme

THORLEY Jessica
2018

This report draws on research and learning gathered from the Ambition for Ageing programme, which aimed to help to create more age-friendly places and empower people to live fulfilling lives as they age. Using data and information collected from the programme, the report looks at what older people across Greater Manchester thinks makes a neighbourhood age-friendly. It draws on the: event feedback, participant and volunteer survey responses and a snapshot of case studies. The programme identified key themes for building age-friendly neighbourhoods. These are: the need for positive social connections and community cohesion; participation and meeting opportunities; good accessibility, facilities and transport; community spaces and resources; feelings of safety and security; and available information with effective communication.

Results 1 - 10 of 52

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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