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Results for 'communities'

Results 1 - 10 of 47

Being well together: the creation of the Co-op Community Wellbeing Index

HILL-DIXON Amanda, SOLLEY Suzanne, BYNON Radhika
2019

This report presents the Co-op Community Wellbeing Index (CWI), the first measure of community wellbeing at a neighbourhood level across the UK. The index aims to help understand what community wellbeing means to people across the UK and what communities need to help people to get involved and make communities stronger. The report outlines the conceptual model, methodology, and evidence it is based on. Based on the findings from a literature review and research with communities, a model of community wellbeing was developed, which underpins the Community Wellbeing Index. In the model is based on three key pillars: people, place, and relationships. Within these three pillars there are 9 domains of community wellbeing: relationships and trust; equality; voice and participation; health; education and learning; economy, work and employment; culture, leisure and heritage; housing, space and environment; and transport, mobility and connectivity. The complete Index includes an explanation which reflects the aspirations of communities for each domain and related indicators. The report has been written for anybody interested in community wellbeing and will be of particular interest to community sector organisations and practitioners, policymakers, researchers, and funders.

Heritage and wellbeing. The impact of historic places and assets on community wellbeing: a scoping review

PENNINGTON Andy, et al
2019

A scoping review of evidence on the impact of heritage places, interventions, and assets – things like historic objects, monuments or buildings – to discover how they impact individual and community wellbeing. The primary focus of the review was on impacts of historic places and assets set within the ‘living environment’ of communities, but it also considers evidence from projects that used historic objects/artefacts, for example, in the care of people with dementia in care homes and other healthcare settings. The review looked at 75 papers and reports. It found higher and lower quality evidence that historic places, assets and associated activities and interventions can have a wide range of beneficial impacts on the physical, mental and social wellbeing of individuals and communities. These include increased life satisfaction and social connectivity for individuals and positive effects on community wellbeing such as social relationships, sense of belonging, pride of place, ownership and collective empowerment. It also identifies important gaps in the research, and highlights potential negative wellbeing impacts of participating in heritage-based interventions, or living in historic areas. Potential negative impacts of interventions appear to be related to how well the design and delivery of interventions considered the needs of specific individuals and groups.

Systematic review of community business related approaches to health and social care

McCLEAN Stuart, et al
2019

This systematic review identifies evidence in relation to the impact of community business-related approaches to health and social care on outcomes for its users. In particular, the report asks how effective community businesses are in delivering outcomes for their users. In recent years community businesses which are rooted in a local area and led by the local community have emerged in the wider health and social care market to address factors in local communities that may benefit or harm health and wellbeing. The report demonstrates that the available evidence of varying quality and more research is needed. However, it found that community businesses related approaches such as ‘men’s sheds’ initiatives, village models for older people and community farms impact on a range of health and wellbeing outcomes, These include outcomes for social connectedness, self-esteem, physical health, mental wellbeing and quality of life. It concludes that community businesses deliver benefits for users that could be at least as effective as traditional models of health and social care but more research is needed to provide robust and evidence-based comparisons.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme

The Chatty Cafe Scheme supports cafes to designate a 'Chatter & Natter' table where customers can sit if they are happy to talk to other customers. The scheme aims to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together from mums with their babies to older people.

Building age-friendly neighbourhoods in Greater Manchester: evidence from the Ambition for Ageing programme

THORLEY Jessica
2018

This report draws on research and learning gathered from the Ambition for Ageing programme, which aimed to help to create more age-friendly places and empower people to live fulfilling lives as they age. Using data and information collected from the programme, the report looks at what older people across Greater Manchester thinks makes a neighbourhood age-friendly. It draws on the: event feedback, participant and volunteer survey responses and a snapshot of case studies. The programme identified key themes for building age-friendly neighbourhoods. These are: the need for positive social connections and community cohesion; participation and meeting opportunities; good accessibility, facilities and transport; community spaces and resources; feelings of safety and security; and available information with effective communication.

What makes an age-friendly neighbourhood: briefing

AMBITION FOR AGEING
2018

Drawing on the findings from the Ambition for Ageing programme, this briefing explores what older people across Greater Manchester feel makes an age-friendly neighbourhood. Their responses covered six main themes that interlink to make an age-friendly neighbourhood: Community, integration and belonging; Meeting and participation opportunities; Community resources and spaces; Accessibility, transport and facilities; Feelings of safety and security; and Information and Communication. The Ambition of Ageing programme aimed to find out what works in reducing social isolation by taking an asset-based approach and creating age-friendly communities.

How we build age-friendly neighbourhoods: briefing

AMBITION FOR AGEING
2018

Drawing on the findings from the Ambition for Ageing programme in Manchester, this briefing offers practical guidance for practitioners on how to work with older people to build age-friendly communities using an asset-based approach. It highlights age-friendly activities taking place across Greater Manchester and explores successes and challenges encountered by the Ambition for Ageing programme. The briefing highlights the importance of events and activities being designed and led by older people, for activities to be inclusive and reflect the diversity of the population, the benefits of inter-generational work, and the need to re-thinking the use of community spaces.

The four essential elements of an asset-based community development process

McKNIGHT John, RUSSELL Cormac
2018

This paper provides an overview of Asset-Based Community Development (ABCD) and discusses the four essential elements of the (ABCD) process that make it distinct from other approaches. The paper describes these as: resources - the assets that communities create but services so often ignore, such as individual resident contributions, local groups and the natural and built environment; methods - the assumption that communities can and should drive change themselves; functions - the essential functions that communities can perform for themselves, such as enabling health, shaping local economies, and co-recreating; and evaluation - the questions that can be used to evaluate an ABCD process and assess the effectiveness of community life.

A connected society. A strategy for tackling loneliness: laying the foundations for change

GREAT BRITAIN. Her Majesty's Government
2018

This strategy builds on the work of the Jo Cox Commission on Loneliness and sets out the government's approach to tackling loneliness in England. The strategy highlights the role that everyone can play in tackling loneliness, including government, communities and the individual. The government's work on loneliness is guided by three overarching goals: building the evidence base, embedding loneliness as a consideration across government policy, and building a national conversation on loneliness, to raise awareness of its impacts and to help tackle stigma. Chapter one provides a summary of the existing evidence base on loneliness, including its impacts and causes. The following three chapters set out government commitments and partnerships in three areas seen as crucial to build a connected society. These are: organisations and services - how government, working with local authorities, health bodies, businesses and the voluntary sector will introduce a range of new initiatives that enable the everyday services we use to connect those at risk of loneliness to support; community infrastructure – such as accessing community space, transport and well designed housing; and building a culture that encourages strong social relationships – including tackling stigma surrounding loneliness and supporting community groups. Chapter five sets out how government will take this agenda forward and sets out a commitment from the Loneliness Action Group to continue its work until at least the end of 2019. The document highlights examples from practice throughout.

Age-friendly and inclusive volunteering: review of community contributions in later life

JOPLING Kate, JONES Dan
2018

This review considers how to enable more people to contribute to their communities, in later life (defined as aged 50 and over), with a focus on increasing participation among underrepresented groups, especially those in poor health or living with long-term health conditions. It covers activities such as neighbourliness, helping in the community and volunteering. It draws on a range of sources including a call for evidence, a call for practice and seven roundtable meetings involving over 100 participants. The report looks at why people get involved with their communities and how contributing to communities can improve social connections, and lead to increased life satisfaction and wellbeing; how volunteering can change across the life course; and the practical, structural and emotional barriers to contributing to communities. It sets out a framework for age-friendly, inclusive volunteering, which includes for volunteering to: be flexible and to fit around life changes; to provide support and training needed; to provide opportunities to be sociable and feel connected; value volunteers; provide meaningful activity; and make good use of strengths and experiences. The review makes recommendations for the voluntary, public and private sectors on how to tackle the barriers to enable people to continue to volunteer throughout their lifetime. Case studies of good practice are included throughout the report.

Results 1 - 10 of 47

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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