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Results for 'community care'

Results 1 - 10 of 31

ConnectWELL

ConnectWELL

Introducing ConnectWELL - a social prescribing service – initially funded and piloted in 2014 by NHS Rugby CCG, which aims to improve health and wellbeing for patients and clients. ConnectWELL provides Health Professionals with just one, straightforward referral route to the many Voluntary and Community Sector organisations, groups and activities that can address underlying societal causes, manage or prevent compounding factors of ill-health. ConnectWELL has over 900 organisations and activities, ranging from Carers’ support, community groups, disability services, Faith / Religious / Cultural Activities, Housing / Homelessness Support, Mentoring, Music Groups, and volunteering opportunities.

Facilitators and barriers of implementing and delivering social prescribing services: a systematic review

PESCHENY Julia Vera, PAPPAS Yannis, RANDHAWA Gurch
2018

Background: Social Prescribing is a service in primary care that involves the referral of patients with non-clinical needs to local services and activities provided by the third sector (community, voluntary, and social enterprise sector). Social Prescribing aims to promote partnership working between the health and the social sector to address the wider determinants of health. To date, there is a weak evidence base for Social Prescribing services. The objective of the review was to identify factors that facilitate and hinder the implementation and delivery of SP services based in general practice involving a navigator. Methods: The search included eleven databases, the grey literature, and the reference lists of relevant studies to identify the barriers and facilitators to the implementation and delivery of Social Prescribing services in June and July 2016. Searches were limited to literature written in English. No date restrictions were applied. Findings were synthesised narratively, employing thematic analysis. The Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool Version 2011 was used to evaluate the methodological quality of included studies. Results: Eight studies were included in the review. The synthesis identified a range of factors that facilitate and hinder the implementation and delivery of SP services. Facilitators and barriers were related to: the implementation approach, legal agreements, leadership, management and organisation, staff turnover, staff engagement, relationships and communication between partners and stakeholders, characteristics of general practices, and the local infrastructure. The quality of most included studies was poor and the review identified a lack of published literature on factors that facilitate and hinder the implementation and delivery of Social Prescribing services. Conclusion: The review identified a range of factors that facilitate and hinder the implementation and delivery of Social Prescribing services. Findings of this review provide an insight for commissioners, managers, and providers to guide the implementation and delivery of future Social Prescribing services. More high quality research and transparent reporting of findings is needed in this field.

Community services: what do we know about quality? Briefing

O'DOWD Nora Cooke, DORNING Holly
2017

This briefing looks at trends in national measures in English community trusts to try to gain a view of quality in community services more generally. The analysis examines trends in routinely collected national quality measures in 18 community trusts in England, which account for a quarter of all community health services delivered in the NHS. Some of the key findings are: care in community trusts was predominantly delivered by professionally qualified clinical staff such as community health nurses, allied health professionals and community health visitors – staff numbers in the 18 trusts stayed roughly stable between late 2013 and 2016, although demand has almost certainly increased; these staff were roughly as satisfied with their jobs as staff in all NHS trusts, although they were less likely to recommend their trust as a place to work; the median waiting time for an outpatient appointment was three days longer in the community than across all trusts in England; patients using services offered by community trusts would generally recommend them to a friend and were less likely to experience harm compared to those using services provided by non-community trusts. The briefing concludes that the difficulties experienced in gathering useful information on community services indicate that the national lack of community data needs to be resolved before questions of quality can be meaningfully answered.

Herts Independent Living Service

Hertfordshire Independent Living Service

Hertfordshire Independent Living Service (HILS) was established with support from Hertfordshire County Council in 2007 to provide a meals on wheels service. HILS has developed over the last ten years to provide a range of caring services to support vulnerable and older people to live happily, healthily, and independently at home. HILS supports local statutory health and social care partners by offering much-needed services to some of the most vulnerable living independently in Hertfordshire, which are easily accessed by professionals through established referral processes.

Cambridgeshire Community Navigators

Cambridgeshire County Council

The Community Navigator (CN) project began in 2012 as a key response to the views expressed by Cambridgeshire residents and stakeholders through the Ageing Well programme. From these events it was clear that there is a wealth of community and voluntary activity that supports older and vulnerable adults in the county, but what was missing was a countywide infrastructure, which at a local level, linked and supported people to access these activities.

ExtraCare's Wellbeing Programme

The ExtraCare Charitable Trust

ExtraCare’s Wellbeing Programme was developed in 2002, in partnership with older people who live at ExtraCare’s Schemes and Villages. The concept was launched following a survey, which highlighted that 75% of residents at one location had not accessed any health screening via their GPs or the NHS. A pilot screening scheme subsequently identified 122 previously undetected conditions amongst a population of just 136, highlighting a clear need for the Programme.

Integrated care for older people with frailty: innovative approaches in practice

ROYAL COLLEGE OF GENERAL PRACTITIONERS, BRITISH GERIATRICS SOCIETY
2016

Joint report showing how GPs and geriatricians are collaborating to design innovative schemes to improve the provision of integrated care for older people with frailty. The report highlights 13 case studies from across the UK which show what an integrated health and social care system looks like in practice and the positive impact it can have. The case studies are grouped into three areas: schemes to help older people remain active and independent, extending primary and community support to provide better services in the community, and integrated care to support patients in hospital. The examples cover a range of locations across the UK, including urban and rural populations, and a range of settings, including services based in the community, in GP practices, in care homes and in hospitals. Whilst the majority of the initiatives led by GPs or geriatricians, they illustrate the vital role that many other professionals play, including nurses, therapists, pharmacists and social workers. The report also outlines some common themes from the case studies, which include person-centred care, multidisciplinary working, taking a proactive approach and making use of resources in the community.

Harnessing social action to support older people: evaluating the Reducing Winter Pressures Fund

GEORGHIOU Theo, et al
2016

Presents the findings of an evaluation of seven social action projects funded by the Cabinet Office, NHS England, Monitor, NHS Trust Development Authority and the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services. The aim of the Reducing Winter Pressures Fund was to scale up and test projects that used volunteers to support older people to stay well, manage health conditions or recover after illness, and thereby reduce pressure on hospitals. The organisations supported by the fund comprised a range of national and local charities. These projects fell into three broad categories: community-based support, supporting discharge from hospital wards, and supporting individuals in A&E department to avoid admissions. Between them, the projects offered a wide range of services to older people – both direct (for example help with shopping or providing transport) and indirect (linking with other services). The evaluation resulted in a mixed set of findings. From the interviews with staff, volunteers and local stakeholders, there was evidence of services that had made an impact by providing practical help, reassurance and connection with other services that could reduce isolation and enable independence. Those involved with the projects felt that volunteers and project staff could offer more time to users than pressurised statutory sector staff, which enabled a fuller understanding of a person’s needs while also freeing up staff time. However, the analysis of hospital activity data in the months that followed people's referral into the projects did not suggest that these schemes impacted on the use of NHS services in the way that was assumed, with no evidence of a reduction in emergency hospital admissions, or in costs of hospital care following referral to the social action projects. The one exception was the project based in an A&E department, which revealed a smaller number of admissions in the short term. The report questions whether these sorts of interventions can ever be fully captured solely using hospital-based data and conceptualising reduced or shortened admissions as a key marker of success.

Making it happen: take action to get people with a learning disability, autism and/or challenging behaviour out of inpatient units. A guide for campaigners about Transforming Care Partnerships

MENCAP, CHALLENGING BEHAVIOUR FOUNDATION, NATIONAL AUTISTIC SOCIETY
2016

Guide to help local groups and individuals campaign for change to enable people with a learning disability, autism and/or challenging behaviour to move from inpatient units into the community. The guide highlights NHS England's promise in 'Building the Right Support' to close 35-50 per cent of inpatient beds and develop the right support in the communities by March 2019. It sets out the scale of the challenge and outlines the role of the 48 Transforming Care Partnerships, set up to implement NHS England's plans. The guide then provides advice on how campaigning groups and individuals can contact local Transforming Care Partnerships to find out more about their plans and find out what is being done to develop the right support. It includes a template letter to help contact local Partnerships; a checklist of key principles that should be included in Transforming Care Partnership plans; and a list organisations that can provide further support.

Evaluation of Prevention Matters

APTELIGEN, et al
2015

An evaluation of Prevention Matters, a whole county change programme designed to facilitate access to frontline community services and groups in Buckinghamshire. The programme targets those whose needs are below the substantial need threshold for adult social care, building on a referral system, rather than on direct support. Fourteen Community Practice Workers (CPWs) are aligned to the seven GP localities in Buckinghamshire, and lead on the referral process, from first contact with the users to final review and exit. The CPWs are supported by seven Community Links Officers who ensure that the necessary resources are available in the community to meet users’ needs, including identification of opportunities to build new capacity. A wide network of frontline community services and groups provides direct face-to-face support to users through activities such as befriending, transport, fitness, and lunch clubs. The evaluation found that the potential to maintain independence and delay access to adult social care may be less than originally intended as a result of the complexity of the needs and frailty of some programme users. Nonetheless, nearly half of all programme users reported improvement in their satisfaction with the level of social contact they had and a third of programme users reported that their quality of life was better at the review stage compared to the time of their baseline assessment. In addition, the evaluation concluded that the programme has been particularly successful at facilitating access to information. The analysis indicates that the benefits associated with the programme are £1,000 per user per year, including the value of the improvements in health suggested by the impact evaluation (£500), and estimated spill-over effects on the need for informal social care (£492). The report also highlights the positive impact on organisations and systems, and increased volunteering capacity and sets out a series of recommendations to strengthen the delivery of the programme.

Results 1 - 10 of 31

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News

My Guide: new case example

My Guide: new case example My Guide is a sighted guiding service, started by The Guide Dogs for the Blind Association (Guide Dogs), in which trained volunteers assist blind and partially sighted adults to get out and about, thus helping to prevent social isolation.
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