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Results for 'community development'

Results 1 - 10 of 66

Dementia-friendly Brent: a model of community

TILKI Mary
2018

Report on the London borough of Brent's dynamic social movement helping to make the borough dementia friendly. Community Action on Dementia Brent (CADBrent) is a dynamic social movement that aims to make the London borough dementia friendly, accessible and inclusive of black and minority ethnic (BME) communities. Much has been achieved since the movement began five years ago. Some of the schemes discussed in the article include: Dementia peer support project; dementia friendly Mapesbury; The De-Cafe - memory cafe; Whole street of support; The Shed and Parnerships in Innovative Education.

Health 2020 priority area four: creating supportive environments and resilient communities: a compendium of inspirational examples


2018

Brings together innovative examples of actions taken in 13 countries to strengthen resilience and build supportive environments for population health and well-being. The examples show how building resilience can be achieved by developing and sustaining partnerships between institutions and communities; by community action and bottom-up efforts; at system level, both nationally and locally. The examples, primarily gathered from community initiatives, are linked to the four types of resilience capacities: adaptive, absorptive, anticipatory and transformative. Topics covered include the role of resilience building in addressing human rights, health inequities, environmental hazards, and health-related topics such as communicable and noncommunicable diseases. Examples from the UK include: Promoting social connections and community networks for older people through Better in Sheffield; Supporting local systems to tackle the social determinants of health inequalities; Strengthening resilience through the early intervention and prevention: breaking the generational cycle of crime project; and A social movement for health and resilience in Blackburn with Darwen. Each example attempts to describe: the action undertaken; the resilience-related issue that the action aimed to address; and the impact and lessons learnt in the process of strengthening resilience.

Interventions to reduce social isolation and loneliness among older people: an integrative review

GARDINER Clare, GELDENHUYS Gideon, GOTT Merryn
2018

Loneliness and social isolation are major problems for older adults. Interventions and activities aimed at reducing social isolation and loneliness are widely advocated as a solution to this growing problem. The aim of this study was to conduct an integrative review to identify the range and scope of interventions that target social isolation and loneliness among older people, to gain insight into why interventions are successful and to determine the effectiveness of those interventions. Six electronic databases were searched from 2003 until January 2016 for literature relating to interventions with a primary or secondary outcome of reducing or preventing social isolation and/or loneliness among older people. Data evaluation followed Evidence for Policy and Practice Information and Co‐ordinating Centre guidelines and data analysis was conducted using a descriptive thematic method for synthesising data. The review identified 38 studies. A range of interventions were described which relied on differing mechanisms for reducing social isolation and loneliness. The majority of interventions reported some success in reducing social isolation and loneliness, but the quality of evidence was generally weak. Factors which were associated with the most effective interventions included adaptability, a community development approach, and productive engagement. A wide range of interventions have been developed to tackle social isolation and loneliness among older people. However, the quality of the evidence base is weak and further research is required to provide more robust data on the effectiveness of interventions. Furthermore, there is an urgent need to further develop theoretical understandings of how successful interventions mediate social isolation and loneliness.

Asset based approaches and inequalities: briefing

AMBITION FOR AGEING
2018

Asset-based approaches can make significant and positive changes to people’s lives. However, if implemented without an understanding of marginalisation, asset-based approaches risk contributing to existing inequalities, excluding those who are the most socially isolated. Using learning from the Ambition for Ageing programme, this briefing highlights the need for recognition of the barriers faced by marginalised groups as a key part of asset-based work. It puts forward a number of solutions, such as supporting marginalised groups to be involved in genuine co-production and asset mapping, using targeted approaches to identify marginalised and social isolated groups, and well-planned processes for enhancing community capacity. It also includes case studies and key findings from the Ambition for Ageing programme in Greater Manchester.

Health matters: community-centred approaches for health and wellbeing

PUBLIC HEALTH ENGLAND
2018

This resource focuses on the concept and practice of community-centred approaches for health and wellbeing and outlines how to create the conditions for community assets to thrive. It looks at the benefits of working with communities, in terms of improved outcomes and potential savings. It also outlines the range of community-centred approaches that can be used to improve community health and wellbeing. These include initiatives to strengthen communities; volunteering and peer support; collaborations and partnerships; and access to community resources. It highlights evidence, key policy documents and includes links to resources and case studies.

Learning from the vanguards: supporting people and communities to stay well

NHS CONFEDERATION, et al
2018

This briefing explores how the care vanguard sites have sought to design health and care services around the needs of people who use them, focusing on the outcomes that matter to people and tailoring care to their needs and goals. It also explores how the vanguards have adopted community- and asset-based approaches to consider the broadest possible influencers on health and care. This new approach recognises that services should be designed to support people to be more involved in their own care, challenges the traditional divide between patients and professionals, and offers opportunities for better health through increased prevention and supported self-care. The briefing includes examples of practice from the vanguard sites. The briefing is part of a series developed by the NHS Confederation, NHS Clinical Commissioners, NHS Providers and Local Government Association.

Commissioning community development for health: a concise handbook

CHANAN Gabriel, FISHER Brian
2018

A practical guide to help Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs), sustainability and transformation partnerships (STPs) and local authorities to commission community development to support health and wellbeing. The guide looks at the role of community development in health and health policy, explains the main features of community development and the role community-based approaches can play in improving services. It includes a seven step framework for building community-led partnerships with local agencies and suggests key performance indicators that can be used to evaluate progress. It also provides a model contract for provision of the community development project and identifies the skill set for community development leaders and staff. The handbook is tailored to current policy in England, but the key principles have wider relevance.

People powered recovery: social action and complex needs. Findings from a call for evidence

TURNING POINT
2018

The UK All-Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) on complex needs and dual diagnosis was established in 2007 in recognition of the fact that people seeking help often have a number of over-lapping needs including problems around access to housing, social care, unemployment services, mental health provision or substance misuse support. This report sets out the findings from a call for evidence on how social action can improve outcomes and develop more responsive services for people with complex needs or a dual diagnosis. Social action is about people coming together to tackle an issue, support others or improve their local area, by sharing their time and expertise through volunteering, peer-led groups and community projects. The report provides examples of how social action can support recovery, self-worth and confidence, boost employment prospects and skills, reduce stigma, better shape services to meet people’s needs, contribute to better health and wellbeing and save money. It also looks at how to overcome some of the challenges and barriers to developing social action focused around complex needs. These include resources, stigma, procedural issues, leadership, commissioning structures and demonstrating benefits.

Connect for a kinder tomorrow: new approaches to loneliness

KENNEDY Seema, REEVES Rachel
2017

This report, from the Jo Cox Commission on Loneliness, argues that loneliness is everybody’s business and calls for every individual to make better connections in order to tackle the problem. It provides suggestions for individuals, voluntary and community groups, employers, local and central government on what they can do to tackle loneliness on a day to day basis. It also makes reference to examples of good practice throughout. In order to build a less lonely nation, it recommends people to adopt a ‘five a day’ rule and have a minimum of five conversations each day and take a ‘Connect 4’ approach, where individuals have four meaningful relationships they can count on.

Community development in health: a literature review


2016

This literature review offers a brief background to the current state of play in the NHS and statutory services, and ideas that services more flexible, place-based services are likely to offer more effective and efficient outcomes. It then provides an overview of the nature of community development, its relationship to community health and to enhancing the responsiveness of commissioning of services. It brings together evidence which shows how communities can be supported to develop their own strengths and their own trajectories of development. It also examines the health benefits of community engagement, and identifies the limitations of some studies and where evidence that suggests poor outcomes or risks. It looks developing a business case, and what is already known of costs and benefits of community development. It finds that although it is difficult to express costs and benefits of community development in monetary terms, some effective techniques do exist. The evidence shows that community development helps to strengthen and increase social networks and therefore build up social capital. Evidence shows that they to contribute significantly to individual and to community health and resilience. Existing data also suggests that community development in health is cost-effective and provides good value for money. The review includes definitions of community development and key related concepts, including as asset-based approaches, co-production, social networks, social capital, and community capital.

Results 1 - 10 of 66

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