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Results for 'community development'

Results 1 - 10 of 84

An evidence summary of health inequalities in older populations in coastal and rural areas: full report

PUBLIC HEALTH ENGLAND
2019

A rapid evidence review on the health inequalities experienced by older people in coastal and rural areas, supplemented with case studies. The review aimed to identify key determinants of health inequalities experienced by older populations in coastal and rural areas; looks at the strengths and assets of ageing populations in these areas; reviews the effectiveness health and social care system interventions and whole system approaches; and assess the opportunities for using digital technology. In addition to a rapid review of the national literature (covering the UK and Ireland), a search of international literature focusing on interventions to reduce health inequalities was also carried out. It is intended for local authorities, clinical commissioning groups and other health and care organisations to inform strategic planning, service design and commissioning, as well as the development of local community infrastructure. It also provides summary of key considerations in taking an asset-based approach in reducing inequalities and promoting productive healthy ageing in these areas. Two accompanying reports have also been published, an executive summary with main messages and an annex of included studies.

An evaluation of Rainbow Services community builder project: the Senior Safe and Social Programme

HAINES Sarah
2018

An evaluation of the Senior Safe and Social Project in Harlow, a project to reduce loneliness and social isolation in older people. The evaluation aims to provide an insight into why the model is working well, whether it could be applied to other demographics, how the approach compares with similar models, and the sustainability of the project. The project, based on an Asset Based Community Development (ABCD) model, provides weekly clubs and events in local communities, which are directed by older people themselves. The evaluation identified key factors identified that helped the model work. These included that social groups are design designed around the participants and give them control over what they do. Volunteers’ involvement in the project represents a reciprocal exchange, giving the volunteer the opportunity to socialise and sense of usefulness and connection in the local community. The evaluation suggests that the model could be applied to other locations and other age groups, such as young mothers and ‘empty nesters’. The report includes suggestions for the future development of the project.

It’s time for Local Area Coordination

COMMUNITY CATALYSTS
2019

The report provides information on the Local Area Coordination and highlights the positive impact it has had on communities in England and Wales. Drawing on the experience of the 11 current members of the Local Area Coordination Network, who are local authorities or health services, the report shares stories to show how the model can: make local communities better places to live; improve the health and wellbeing of local people; integrate health and social care; co-produce change with local people; reform the front door to services; and create social value and reduce costs.

Agents for change: an evaluation of the Somerset Village Agents programme

COMMUNITY COUNCIL FOR SOMERSET
2017

An evaluation of the Somerset Village Agents programme, which aims to reduce isolation and help connect excluded and vulnerable people with services that support them to improve their independence, health and wellbeing. It uses locally based staff who act as first point of contact for people needing information and support. The evaluation, undertaken jointly by South West Forum and Clarity CiC with support from University of Gloucestershire, included analysis of client data, interviews with clients and discussions with locally based staff. Analysis was carried out between October 2016 and February 2017. The results of the evaluation found that the Somerset Village Agents programme is highly regarded by clients, statutory agencies and voluntary and public organisations who have a connection with the programme. It is also helping the most isolated, lonely and vulnerable people in the community, especially older people and those with disabilities and/or long-term health conditions. Areas for potential improvement identified by the evaluation included expanding reach of the programme to reach more younger people and more work to build community capacity. A cost benefit analysis of the programme estimates that for the 21-month period reviewed the Village Agents programme cost £646,000 to deliver and generated £2.5 million in direct savings to the state and a further £2.74 million in wider social value. The report makes recommendations for the future development of the programme.

Bringing people together: how community action can tackle loneliness and social isolation

ANDERSON Zoe, et al
2019

Learning and examples from a range of community and voluntary sector projects tackling social isolation and loneliness in the UK. Drawing on the work of charities, the report considers the causes of loneliness, looks at 'what works' to prevent it and suggests ways to offer support to those who are isolated or lonely. Preventative initiatives include giving something back through volunteering, helping people to take on new interests, and investing in community spaces to help people share interests together. Examples to support those who are lonely or isolated include giving people choices in how to get involved and to make steps manageable, simple solutions such as befriending and peer support, tailoring solutions for different age groups, and using technology such as such as social media and computer tablets to widen access to support. The report shows that supporting people to improve their mindset, building new connections with others, building confidence and developing a new sense of purpose, can have a big impact in reducing feelings of loneliness and isolation. The report is based on interviews with funded organisations and staff in The National Lottery Community Fund staff.

Social infrastructure: how shared spaces make communities work. Briefing

AMBITION FOR AGEING
2019

This briefing highlights the importance of shared spaces to help reduce social isolation amongst older people as the population ages and austerity leads to more and more state responsibilities falling to civil society. Shared spaces could be public libraries, commercial spaces such as cafes or leisure facilities and parks and green spaces. The briefing explains how different kinds of shared spaces help support different types and levels of social capital. This can be between people who share a common bond as well as connections between diverse groups of people. The ability to build even weak social ties with a diversity of people can help provide bridges to new social worlds, helping older people feel more connected to the places in which they live and improving resilience. The briefing summarises findings from the report, 'Social Infrastructure: how shared spaces make communities work' produced by MICRA as part of the Ambition for Ageing programme.

Social infrastructure: how shared spaces make communities work

YARKER Sophie
2019

This report, from the Ambition for Ageing project, identifies how social infrastructure in neighbourhoods can promote social interaction and reduce social isolation for older people. Social infrastructure provides spaces and opportunities for people to have social interactions and build connections. The report argues there needs to be a diversity of social infrastructure to support different types and levels of social connection, and considers the importance of the connections made between diverse groups of people - also known as bridging capital. It also looks at the types of social infrastructure that facilitate this, which tend to be places that the majority of the community would have the opportunity to visit, such as public libraries, cafes and parks and open public spaces. Key points include: that shared spaces within neighbourhoods are vital for reducing social isolation for older people; that different kinds of social infrastructure help support different types and levels of social capital; and the need for social infrastructure that supports intergenerational and intercultural encounters. Despite its often informal nature, social infrastructure is not naturally occurring and therefore The report highlights the need for direct investment and support to help the development of the social infrastructure and the creation of third places.

Working inclusively to make communities age-friendly: briefing

AMBITION FOR AGEING
2019

This briefing paper looks at how to design effective and inclusive ways of working to reach more older people in minority or marginalised communities. It argues that equality, diversity and inclusivity are central to understanding and reducing social isolation, and looks at key ways to embed inclusion in building age-friendly communities. These include: having a good understanding of communities themselves; designing genuinely inclusive opportunities, as well delivering targeted approaches; and working with an equalities mindset. The briefing draws on learning from research and reflection by the Ambition for Ageing Equalities Board. This briefing will be of interest to those working to tackle loneliness and social isolation of older people from marginalised communities, and those concerned that community and neighbourhood-level work reaches people in marginalised communities.

Evaluation of the H4All Wellbeing Service pilot: April 1st 2016 - January 31st 2017

JAMMU Dalvinder, BOND Andy
2017

An evaluation of the first 10 months of the Hillingdon H4All Wellbeing Service pilot, commissioned by Hillingdon CCG in April 2016. The service is a collaboration between 5 local third sector charities and provides older patients in Hillingdon with a range of services, including: information and advice, practical support, goal setting and ongoing support to manage LTCs, befriending and mentoring, and signposting and referral to voluntary and statutory services. During the evaluation period the H4All service supported 1,099 patients with 2,729 enquiries resulting in 11,675 contacts with/for patients. Analysis of completed Patient Activation Measure (PAM) outcome questionnaires found that most people accessing the service increased their PAM score, with an average movement of 8 points per patient in their individual scores. A total of 44 of the Hillingdon GP practices referred to the Wellbeing Service during the evaluation period in the first ten months and gave very positive feedback. The appendices include individual patient case studies highlight how they have benefitted from the service.

Systematic review of community business related approaches to health and social care

McCLEAN Stuart, et al
2019

This systematic review identifies evidence in relation to the impact of community business-related approaches to health and social care on outcomes for its users. In particular, the report asks how effective community businesses are in delivering outcomes for their users. In recent years community businesses which are rooted in a local area and led by the local community have emerged in the wider health and social care market to address factors in local communities that may benefit or harm health and wellbeing. The report demonstrates that the available evidence of varying quality and more research is needed. However, it found that community businesses related approaches such as ‘men’s sheds’ initiatives, village models for older people and community farms impact on a range of health and wellbeing outcomes, These include outcomes for social connectedness, self-esteem, physical health, mental wellbeing and quality of life. It concludes that community businesses deliver benefits for users that could be at least as effective as traditional models of health and social care but more research is needed to provide robust and evidence-based comparisons.

Results 1 - 10 of 84

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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