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Results for 'community development'

Results 11 - 20 of 52

Local community initiatives in Western Bay: formative evaluation summary report

SWANSEA UNIVERSITY
2016

An evaluation of the early implementation of Local Area Coordination (LAC) and Local Community Coordination (LCC) in Neath Port Talbot and Swansea, covering recruitment and initial delivery activities between July 2015 and April 2016. The initiative used both LAC and LCC coordinators to help communities to develop local relationships and support, reduce dependence on services and create conditions for long-term resilience. The evaluation identifies positive outcomes for people, communities and local finances; highlights factors which help create the conditions for good outcomes; and provides recommendations for the development and improvement of LAC. The report also contains case study examples to show how the initiative was able to help individuals. The results of the evaluation found good progress in both LAC and LCC areas, including community engagement, identifying community assets and individuals for support. It also found LAC helped development of strong and sustained personal networks for individuals and communities, reducing isolation and helping to build local resilience. The LAC implementation in Swansea demonstrated cost benefits of £800k - £1.2m, with expected benefits to rise when LAC is embedded more fully within communities. Findings and recommendations are listed across a number of key themes, including: strategy, funding, shared learning, leadership, information recording, recruitment and roles, cost benefits.

Public health working with the voluntary, community and social enterprise sector: new opportunities and sustainable change

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION, VOLUNTEERING MATTERS
2017

A collection of case study examples which show how public health and the voluntary, community and social enterprise sector (VCSE) are working together to improve people's health and wellbeing. The case studies cover the themes of: positive partnership and engagement between public health and the VCSE sector; commissioning and new delivery models; supporting a financially sustainable future; integrating services; and community-centred approaches. Case studies include an initiative to tackle social isolation and loneliness in older people; an integrated lifestyle and wellness support services for people at the greatest risk of poor health outcomes; and lonely, and socially isolated a marginalised people. Each case study includes an overview of the service, evaluation findings where available and key learning from the initiative. Suggestions for good practice in partnership working between public health and the VCSE sector are also included.

North London Cares and South London Cares

North London Cares and South London Cares

North London Cares (NLC) and South London Cares (SLC) are community networks mobilising young professionals to volunteer to spend time with and support their older neighbours in Camden and Islington (NLC) and Lambeth and Southwark (SLC), in order to reduce loneliness and isolation amongst older people (and young professionals alike); to improve the skills, confidence, wellbeing and resilience so that all participants can better navigate the rapidly changing modern world; and to reduce the division across social and generational divides in London.

Working with faith groups to promote health and wellbeing

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2017

This report, published in association with FaithAction, looks at how local authorities and faith groups can work together to improve the health and wellbeing outcomes of communities. It also highlights examples of good practice from across the country, and from different faiths, to demonstrate the wide range of activity taking place. The report covers how faith groups can improve health outcomes and tackle health inequalities; the benefits of joint working for councils, health organisations and faith groups; barriers to collaboration and what local authorities can do to make sure the widest range of groups are involved; and looks at ways of establishing effective partnerships and activities, including through adopting the national Faith Covenant. The report includes questions for councils and faith groups to assess whether there is more that can be done to work well together. It also signposts to useful resources for further learning and action.

No one should have no one: working to end loneliness amongst older people

MORTIMER Jill
2016

This report aims to raise awareness about the importance of addressing chronic loneliness amongst older people. It looks at recent initiatives of Age UK and includes early findings from ‘Testing Promising Approaches to Reducing Loneliness’, an Age UK programme with eight local Age UKs developed to services to find and help older people experiencing loneliness. Taking a community-based approach to combatting widespread loneliness the programme been successfully reduced isolation among the majority of trial participants. The programme identified learning in a number of areas, including: the benefits of building, developing and joining up local services rather than introducing a range of new services; the need for training to carry out guided conversations to identify people’s needs; that phone calls play an important role as part of a range of services; that there are costs involved in supporting networks and volunteers; and measuring levels and changes in loneliness. The report also highlights the action local councillors and MPs can take to prevent and tackle loneliness.

The community mapping toolkit: a guide to community asset mapping for community groups and local organisations

PRESTON CITY COUNCIL
2016

A toolkit to help community groups to map the individual, community and institutional assets in their local area. A community asset mapping can help to develop a picture of the community to shows its capacity and potential. This information can be used to gain a better understanding of community priorities and create neighbourhood action plans, which make the best use of the local assets. This toolkit explains the process behind asset mapping, looks at how to carry out a Community Street Audit, provides advice on making asset mapping meaningful and ensuring it leads to constructive action, and on involving different sections of the community - including community residents, elected councillors and representatives from local services. Finally it looks at the tools you may need, and how to keep community and local agencies informed of any action plans arising from the asset mapping.

Volunteering and social action and the Care Act: an opportunity for local government

VOLUNTEERING MATTERS
2016

This paper provides advice and guidance for councillors and chief officers to help them respond to the Care Act 2014 by working together with partners in their local communities to develop volunteering and social action. The paper identifies Care Act duties placed on local government and partner organisation, which are to promote wellbeing; prevent reduce or delay needs by building on the resources of the local community; the provision of information and advice; and shaping a diverse and sustainable local market of providers for care and support. It then highlights the role volunteering can play in helping to fulfil these duties; why the VCSE sector is a useful partner for local authorities seeking to deliver their Care Act responsibilities; and identifies Care Act duties where volunteers can make a contribution. It also identifies shared features of initiatives which are effective building community capacity and promoting voluntary action. These are that they are co-produced, respond to local context, human in scale, strength-based; build in learning; build in sustainability; and adaptive, able to learn from their experience. It concludes with the challenges that need to be addressed to make the most of community capacity and build services which are ‘prevention-focused’. These are to provide community leadership and strategic direction; replicate and scale up good practice; prioritisation versus competing demands; commissioning practice; facilitate choice and control through micro-commissioning; supplement not displace paid work; and measure the impact of volunteering. Includes links to additional resources and sources of information.

Ageing Better: social prescribing and older people: guide to developing development project plans

HOY Christine
2014

Developed as part of the Better Ageing project, this guide provides advice on developing social prescribing plans and approaches as a way of tackling loneliness in older people. It highlights the importance of ensuring that social prescribing initiatives sustainable by engaging the support of local groups such as general practices, voluntary and third sector organisations. It also highlights key stages of developing any plan. These include: the importance of empathy and awareness when holding initial conversations to link people with support; mapping local assets, groups and activities; developing ways to find and use information about local sources of support; the collection of evaluation data; use of digital technologies in social prescribing; and presenting local plans using appropriate language and vocabulary. It also suggests key areas that could be covered in social prescribing plans, such as governance and accountability, plan for local evaluation, local collaboration and training and support needs. Includes a list of useful links and resources.

Trapped in a bubble: an investigation into triggers for loneliness in the UK

CO-OPERATIVES UK, BRITISH RED CROSS
2016

This research investigates potential triggers for loneliness across life stages, focusing on the causes, experiences and impacts of loneliness for six selected groups. It also looks at the support available for people experiencing loneliness, the services people would like, and how they would like that support to be delivered. The research focuses on: young new mums; individuals with mobility limitations; individuals with health issues; individuals who are recently divorced or separated; individuals living without children at home ('empty-nesters') and retirees; and the recently bereaved. It also draws on the views of experts and public opinion on loneliness gathered through a survey. The research found that the causes of loneliness of often complex, stemming from a combination of personal, community, and UK-wide factors. It also confirmed that people experiencing life events which can disrupt existing connections or change their role in society are at risk of loneliness. Other factors contributing to loneliness included: difficulty in accessing statutory services and support, the rapid disappearance of social spaces, and inadequate transport infrastructure. Loneliness can have physical, psychological and social impacts which can negatively impact on communities and people’s ability to connect. Experts recommend a combination of the following three models of support to tackle loneliness, depending on individual circumstances: preventative; responsive, which is shaped by the needs of those already experiencing loneliness and restorative, helping people to rebuild connections and prevent people slipping into chronic loneliness. Participants experiencing loneliness had a preference for face-to-face services, with digital services seen as important but supplementary. All those involved in the research supported the need for small, personal steps to help build community connectedness.

Community action programme: literature search

NGUYEN Hong-Anh, MAGGS Deena
2015

This bibliography contains the results of a literature search on community action. The search used a wide range of search terms across a number of different sources of evidence, including health and social care databases, social sciences / social welfare, economics, public administration and relevant grey literature (including trade and mainstream press). The body of research on community action in public services covers a vast array of concepts involving and including community/user involvement and engagement; community empowerment; co-production, co-creation and collaboration in service design and delivery; how social networks and personal relationships contribute to community resilience; and the evaluation and assessment of these processes. The results of this literature search have been organised thematically to broadly reflect these issues and recent models of delivery, such as the Big Society or place-based services.

Results 11 - 20 of 52

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