#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#

Find prevention records by subject or service provider/commissioner name

  • Key to icons

    • Journal Prevention service example
    • Book Book
    • Digital media Digital media
    • Journal Journal article
    • Free resource Free resource

Results for 'community development'

Results 11 - 20 of 86

Evaluation of the H4All Wellbeing Service pilot: April 1st 2016 - January 31st 2017

JAMMU Dalvinder, BOND Andy
2017

An evaluation of the first 10 months of the Hillingdon H4All Wellbeing Service pilot, commissioned by Hillingdon CCG in April 2016. The service is a collaboration between 5 local third sector charities and provides older patients in Hillingdon with a range of services, including: information and advice, practical support, goal setting and ongoing support to manage LTCs, befriending and mentoring, and signposting and referral to voluntary and statutory services. During the evaluation period the H4All service supported 1,099 patients with 2,729 enquiries resulting in 11,675 contacts with/for patients. Analysis of completed Patient Activation Measure (PAM) outcome questionnaires found that most people accessing the service increased their PAM score, with an average movement of 8 points per patient in their individual scores. A total of 44 of the Hillingdon GP practices referred to the Wellbeing Service during the evaluation period in the first ten months and gave very positive feedback. The appendices include individual patient case studies highlight how they have benefitted from the service.

Systematic review of community business related approaches to health and social care

McCLEAN Stuart, et al
2019

This systematic review identifies evidence in relation to the impact of community business-related approaches to health and social care on outcomes for its users. In particular, the report asks how effective community businesses are in delivering outcomes for their users. In recent years community businesses which are rooted in a local area and led by the local community have emerged in the wider health and social care market to address factors in local communities that may benefit or harm health and wellbeing. The report demonstrates that the available evidence of varying quality and more research is needed. However, it found that community businesses related approaches such as ‘men’s sheds’ initiatives, village models for older people and community farms impact on a range of health and wellbeing outcomes, These include outcomes for social connectedness, self-esteem, physical health, mental wellbeing and quality of life. It concludes that community businesses deliver benefits for users that could be at least as effective as traditional models of health and social care but more research is needed to provide robust and evidence-based comparisons.

The key priorities to prevent and tackle loneliness and social isolation in Wales

WELSH NHS CONFEDERATION
2019

A briefing paper which outlines 20 key areas for the Welsh Government to consider during the consultation to build community resilience and support communities to combat loneliness and social isolation. The priority areas include responding into individual needs and developing a personalised response; supporting lonely individuals to access services, and providing differing levels of support - preventative, responsive and restorative support to help people re-engage with their communities. The priorities are endorsed by a wide group of health and care organisations.

What makes an age-friendly neighbourhood: briefing

AMBITION FOR AGEING
2018

Drawing on the findings from the Ambition for Ageing programme, this briefing explores what older people across Greater Manchester feel makes an age-friendly neighbourhood. Their responses covered six main themes that interlink to make an age-friendly neighbourhood: Community, integration and belonging; Meeting and participation opportunities; Community resources and spaces; Accessibility, transport and facilities; Feelings of safety and security; and Information and Communication. The Ambition of Ageing programme aimed to find out what works in reducing social isolation by taking an asset-based approach and creating age-friendly communities.

How we build age-friendly neighbourhoods: briefing

AMBITION FOR AGEING
2018

Drawing on the findings from the Ambition for Ageing programme in Manchester, this briefing offers practical guidance for practitioners on how to work with older people to build age-friendly communities using an asset-based approach. It highlights age-friendly activities taking place across Greater Manchester and explores successes and challenges encountered by the Ambition for Ageing programme. The briefing highlights the importance of events and activities being designed and led by older people, for activities to be inclusive and reflect the diversity of the population, the benefits of inter-generational work, and the need to re-thinking the use of community spaces.

Londoners said: an analysis of the Thrive LDN community conversations

DAVIE E., et al
2018

This report presents feedback from 17 community workshops, delivered by Thrive LDN in partnership with the Mental Health Foundation, which asked Londoners how they could be better supported to be mentally healthy. The workshops were attended by over 1,000 Londoners including those who commission, provide and use services. In the workshops Londoners gave their views on how Thrive LDN's six aspirations to improve mental health could be delivered. The report includes quotations from attendees. The solutions shared common themes of spreading knowledge, skills and support so that people can better look after themselves and their neighbours. It shows that as well as wanting access to services, Londoners want to be able to help themselves. The report makes recommendations based on the discussions. These include: the development of a network of community champions to tackle isolation; using technological platforms to inform people about support and activities in their community; supporting the development of non-clinical crisis and other wellbeing centres; and providing support for parents through peer-parenting groups.

The four essential elements of an asset-based community development process

McKNIGHT John, RUSSELL Cormac
2018

This paper provides an overview of Asset-Based Community Development (ABCD) and discusses the four essential elements of the (ABCD) process that make it distinct from other approaches. The paper describes these as: resources - the assets that communities create but services so often ignore, such as individual resident contributions, local groups and the natural and built environment; methods - the assumption that communities can and should drive change themselves; functions - the essential functions that communities can perform for themselves, such as enabling health, shaping local economies, and co-recreating; and evaluation - the questions that can be used to evaluate an ABCD process and assess the effectiveness of community life.

The neighbourhood asset mapping of greater Fishponds: a project delivered by BAB community researchers


2018

This report presents the findings of a neighbourhood asset-mapping by community researchers in one area of Bristol, and includes their reflections on the asset-mapping process itself. The mapping included a range of organisations, clubs and activities where older people might engage, either as participants or volunteers, some of which might not be expressly focused on older people. Assets identified ranged from churches and traditional service providers to bicycling and gardening clubs to cafes to individuals who were seen as important resources in their neighbourhoods. The mapping also identified some of the community deficits, which included poor public transportation, obstacles to walkability, and a basic lack of resources and facilities. An important insight from the asset mapping work was how boundaries of wards and neighbourhood partnership areas are artificial from the point of view of both many community groups and many older people, with older residents accessing various assets across ward and neighbourhood partnership boundaries.

A connected society. A strategy for tackling loneliness: laying the foundations for change

GREAT BRITAIN. Her Majesty's Government
2018

This strategy builds on the work of the Jo Cox Commission on Loneliness and sets out the government's approach to tackling loneliness in England. The strategy highlights the role that everyone can play in tackling loneliness, including government, communities and the individual. The government's work on loneliness is guided by three overarching goals: building the evidence base, embedding loneliness as a consideration across government policy, and building a national conversation on loneliness, to raise awareness of its impacts and to help tackle stigma. Chapter one provides a summary of the existing evidence base on loneliness, including its impacts and causes. The following three chapters set out government commitments and partnerships in three areas seen as crucial to build a connected society. These are: organisations and services - how government, working with local authorities, health bodies, businesses and the voluntary sector will introduce a range of new initiatives that enable the everyday services we use to connect those at risk of loneliness to support; community infrastructure – such as accessing community space, transport and well designed housing; and building a culture that encourages strong social relationships – including tackling stigma surrounding loneliness and supporting community groups. Chapter five sets out how government will take this agenda forward and sets out a commitment from the Loneliness Action Group to continue its work until at least the end of 2019. The document highlights examples from practice throughout.

Age-friendly and inclusive volunteering: review of community contributions in later life

JOPLING Kate, JONES Dan
2018

This review considers how to enable more people to contribute to their communities, in later life (defined as aged 50 and over), with a focus on increasing participation among underrepresented groups, especially those in poor health or living with long-term health conditions. It covers activities such as neighbourliness, helping in the community and volunteering. It draws on a range of sources including a call for evidence, a call for practice and seven roundtable meetings involving over 100 participants. The report looks at why people get involved with their communities and how contributing to communities can improve social connections, and lead to increased life satisfaction and wellbeing; how volunteering can change across the life course; and the practical, structural and emotional barriers to contributing to communities. It sets out a framework for age-friendly, inclusive volunteering, which includes for volunteering to: be flexible and to fit around life changes; to provide support and training needed; to provide opportunities to be sociable and feel connected; value volunteers; provide meaningful activity; and make good use of strengths and experiences. The review makes recommendations for the voluntary, public and private sectors on how to tackle the barriers to enable people to continue to volunteer throughout their lifetime. Case studies of good practice are included throughout the report.

Results 11 - 20 of 86

#EXCLUDE#
News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
View more: News
Related SCIE content
Related external content
Visit Social Care Online, the UK’s largest database of information and research on all aspects of social care and social work.
SEARCH NOW
Submit prevention service example
SUBMIT
What do you think about SCIE's work?
FEEDBACK
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#