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Results for 'community development'

Results 31 - 40 of 80

Developing an asset based approach within a learning community: using end of life care as an example

NATIONAL COUNCIL FOR PALLIATIVE CARE
2017

The aim of the report is to be a practical guide to help extend the asset based approach already existing in end of life care into a learning and development model. Part one forms a short summary of the findings of a project that looked at ways to build a more sustainable asset based approach to workforce development and provides detail on what an asset based approach can look like and what factors need to be in place, incorporating lessons learnt, case studies and tips from those who have already explored the approach. It also contains examples of innovative resources that can be used to support learning facilitators. Part two looks at the project brief from which the practical guide originated, the methodology and the underpinning literature. It provides additional case studies and further detail on the work of Dying Matters and Dementia Friends, both networks bringing together communities to support end of life care raising awareness activities, which also offer valuable opportunities for workforce learning and development.

Unlocking the value of VCSE organisations for improving population health and wellbeing: the commissioners role

ATTARD Jessica
2017

This commissioners guide sets out a variety of approaches to working with the voluntary, community and social enterprise sector in order to create additional capacity for improving health and care that is person-centred and community-based. These approaches include adapting current commissioning processes, engaging the VCSE sector to develop more sustainable business models, and creating an environment within which new VCSE organisations or initiatives can be further developed and ‘spun-out’ to fill unmet needs. Based on interviews and learning from across the health and care system, the guide draws together examples of where this is already working well including examples from across London. It is particularly relevant for commissioners and service transformation and improvement leads delivering place-based care, public health and prevention, social prescribing, asset-based approaches and community development.

Asset-based commissioning: better outcomes, better value

FIELD Richard, MILLER Clive
2017

This publication provides an overview of asset-based practice and looks at the development of asset-aware and asset-based commissioning. It makes the case for adopting asset-based commissioning to improve outcomes for individuals and the community and outlines the implications for stakeholders, systems, behaviours and relationships of making this change. Asset-based commissioning is an approach which enables people and communities to become equal co-commissioners and co-producers and make the best use of all assets. The publication includes many examples of past and current innovations and looks at how they could be further developed and implemented at scale to achieve improved, economic, environmental and social outcomes. Key sections: look at the development of asset-based practice, its key principles and the role played by user-led organisations, personalisation, co-production and self-help ; examine how commissioning has evolved over the last three decades and how the current model is moving towards asset-based commissioning; and describe the paradigm shift involved in moving from conventional to asset-based commissioning and synthesises a wide range of asset-based commissioning practices into a unified model. The final section provides a guide to where and how to get started in developing asset-based commissioning and explores how to do this at scale.

Building bridges: bringing councils, communities and independent funders into dialogue

GILBERT Abigail
2017

This report highlights the need for collaboration between local organisations and local government in order to secure the wellbeing of communities at a time of increasing pressure facing local government budgets and increasing demand for services. The report found that councils need to work more closely with other funders of civil society, and communities, to enable change. It shows that effective collaboration between independent funders and local government can result in more intelligent, inclusive commissioning, more innovation at scale, better distribution and use of assets within localities, and more participation and engagement with communities. It also identifies potential barriers to collaboration, which include: a lack of a shared sense of purpose; a lack of consensus on what effective prevention looks like; and both councils and funders wanting to maintain their independence and reputation. The report makes a number of recommendations to improve collaboration. These include: for local authorities to have a senior officer responsible for developing funding; for elected members to building bridges between the council and independent funders; and for independent funders, such as charitable trusts, to work collaboratively with councils in order to define what ‘good’ service delivery looks like. Although the evidence for this report is focused on London, many of the findings and messages will be relevant to a wider audience.

The place of kindness: combating loneliness and building stronger communities

FERGUSON Zoe
2017

Reports on the second stage of a project to explore what can encourage kinder communities at a time when isolation and loneliness are recognised as major challenges. The project was carried out by the Carnegie UK Trust with the support of Joseph Rowntree Foundation, It worked with seven organisations in Scotland over a period of nine months, exploring the importance of places and opportunities to connect, and the intrinsic values that underpin interactions and relationships. This report identifies examples which show how kindness and everyday relationships can affect change and support the wellbeing of individuals and communities. It also identifies key factors that get in the way of encouraging kindness both in individuals and organisations. These include real and imagined rules relating to risk; funders and policy makers valuing the formal and organisational over the informal and individual; and modern definitions of professionalism and good leadership obscuring every day and intuitive human interactions. Examples of the work carried out by the seven organisations are included in the appendices.

Flipping the narrative: essays on transformation from the sector's boldest voices

NEW PHILANTHROPY CAPITAL
2017

A compilation of 16 essays from innovative leaders in the charitable sector on how they are thinking about, and putting into action, new ways of achieving social change for the causes and beneficiaries their organisations. It includes contributions from leaders in national charities and smaller innovative organisations based in communities. The essays cover four key themes: strategy and governance – how organisational and governance change can support charities to deliver greater impact; the sector’s relationship with the public – the importance of trust and how charities can develop trust with the public; the sector’s relationship with the state – how to reframe interactions with the state and methods for forming more productive relationships, building on the strengths of the voluntary sector and their ability to understand the challenges of those accessing public services; and new networks and resources – building collaborations with new partners from different sectors and maximising the potential of new resources, such as digital technology and the voices and strengths of the communities they exist to serve.

Place-based approaches to joint planning, resourcing and delivery: an overview of current practice in Scotland

BACZYK Monika, et al
2016

Sets out the current landscape of place-based approaches to joint planning, resourcing and delivery across Scotland’s local authority areas. The report captures current place-based activities within 27 local authority areas and includes a synthesis of published materials on the subject. As well as undertaking a review of the literature on place-based approaches to service delivery in the UK, the Improvement Service conducted interviews with local authority areas to find out more about local approaches. Whilst there is evidence of a wide variety of approaches being undertaken, the research also highlights a range of common principles that feature across most areas. The study found that the majority of place-based approaches are adopting a holistic approach, focused on reducing inequalities and supporting people, families and communities to improve their life outcomes in the round. Others are focusing on a specific theme, such as family support, health inequalities, physical regeneration and access to services. The report includes a practical checklist that summarises key issues that partnerships may wish to consider, either when embarking upon a new place-based initiative or when reviewing existing activities.

Mobilising communities: insights on community action for health and wellbeing

KERN Ruth, HOLMAN Annette
2017

Summarises key insights from the Mobilising Communities programme, which explored ways of implementing ‘social movements' in health that bring together people's strengths and capacity, community resources and publicly funded services to improve health and wellbeing in communities. The three sites participating in the programme were: the Bromley by Bow Centre and Health Partnership; Spice and Lancashire County Council; and Horsham and Mid Sussex Clinical Commissioning Group. The report briefly summarises the approaches taken by the three sites, which include social prescribing, Time Banking and peer support. The three elements identified as the most important in supporting communities to develop social movements in health were: helping people help themselves; creating opportunities for people to help one another, and creating value between the professional and social spheres. The report shows how each of the three elements can be developed to support a social movement in health for people and communities. Appendices provide flow diagrams to illustrate how each of the three sites implemented the approach. The programme was funded by the government’s Social Action team and delivered by Nesta Health Lab and the Behavioral Insights Team (BIT).

Local community initiatives in Western Bay: formative evaluation summary report

SWANSEA UNIVERSITY
2016

An evaluation of the early implementation of Local Area Coordination (LAC) and Local Community Coordination (LCC) in Neath Port Talbot and Swansea, covering recruitment and initial delivery activities between July 2015 and April 2016. The initiative used both LAC and LCC coordinators to help communities to develop local relationships and support, reduce dependence on services and create conditions for long-term resilience. The evaluation identifies positive outcomes for people, communities and local finances; highlights factors which help create the conditions for good outcomes; and provides recommendations for the development and improvement of LAC. The report also contains case study examples to show how the initiative was able to help individuals. The results of the evaluation found good progress in both LAC and LCC areas, including community engagement, identifying community assets and individuals for support. It also found LAC helped development of strong and sustained personal networks for individuals and communities, reducing isolation and helping to build local resilience. The LAC implementation in Swansea demonstrated cost benefits of £800k - £1.2m, with expected benefits to rise when LAC is embedded more fully within communities. Findings and recommendations are listed across a number of key themes, including: strategy, funding, shared learning, leadership, information recording, recruitment and roles, cost benefits.

Public health working with the voluntary, community and social enterprise sector: new opportunities and sustainable change

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION, VOLUNTEERING MATTERS
2017

A collection of case study examples which show how public health and the voluntary, community and social enterprise sector (VCSE) are working together to improve people's health and wellbeing. The case studies cover the themes of: positive partnership and engagement between public health and the VCSE sector; commissioning and new delivery models; supporting a financially sustainable future; integrating services; and community-centred approaches. Case studies include an initiative to tackle social isolation and loneliness in older people; an integrated lifestyle and wellness support services for people at the greatest risk of poor health outcomes; and lonely, and socially isolated a marginalised people. Each case study includes an overview of the service, evaluation findings where available and key learning from the initiative. Suggestions for good practice in partnership working between public health and the VCSE sector are also included.

Results 31 - 40 of 80

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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