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Results for 'community development'

Results 31 - 40 of 85

What works in community led support? Findings and lessons from local approaches and solutions for transforming adult social care (and health) services...

BROWN Helen, et al
2017

The first evaluation report of the Community Led Support (CLS) programme, which supported nine authorities across England, Wales and Scotland to develop and implement a new model of delivering community based care and support. The findings show what can be achieved when applying core principles associated with asset based approaches. CLS involves local authorities working collaboratively with their communities, partner organisations and staff to design a health and social care service that works for everyone. Its core principles include co-production; a focus on communities; preventing crises by enabling people to get support and advice when they need it; a culture based on trust and empowerment; and treating people as equals, and building on their strengths. The evaluation found evidence that CLS resulted in better experiences and outcomes for local people, improved access to services; greater efficiencies in services; reduced waiting times and lists; increased signposting and resolution through community services; improvement in staff morale; and a potential for cost savings. Sites achieved these changes by adopting a variety of approaches to implementing CLS - from implementing CLS across an entire authority area at the same time, to implementing in one innovation site and encouraging others to adopt aspects of the service. The report identifies six priority areas for action to further develop and embed community led support over the next 12-18 months.

The Kirklees Do Your Thing project

ALLEN Helen
2017

An evaluation of the Kirklees Do Your Thing project, delivered by Community Catalysts, to develop new innovative community-based activities for individuals with learning disabilities and/or autism. The two-year project, which employed a local catalyst, undertook a thorough community scoping exercise to identify organisations and people in Kirklees who might add value to the project; met people with a learning disability and/or autism interested in running an activity (called group leaders) and their supporters; supported group leaders to identify and connect with potential group members; identified community venues which could be used at no or little cost by group leaders to run their activities and formed strong working links with their managers; captured the journeys of the group leaders and showcased the outcomes of their work throughout the life of the project; established and strengthened a circle of formal and informal supports around each group leader to ensure the sustainability of their activity as the project came to end; and developed a set of ‘top tips’ for commissioners and other organisations keen to help other people with disabilities use their talents and interests to set up groups and make a contribution. The evaluation finds that with the right kind of help and support people with learning disabilities and/or autism will readily use their often-unappreciated gifts and talents to set up groups and activities that benefit other people. The project has also successfully challenged negative perceptions of people with learning disabilities and/or autism, helping professionals and families to recognise their strengths and gifts and the contribution they can make with the right kind of support. Key learning points include: it takes time to embed a project like this which brings radically new thinking into an area; some people prefer to work alone, and peer support groups may not work for everybody; establish the boundaries and be clear about the types of support that potential group leaders could or could not expect from the project; focus on the people who are really motivated; and work at people’s own pace.

Releasing Somerset's capacity to care: community micro-providers in Somerset. The impact and outcomes of the Community Catalysts project

COMMUNITY CATALYSTS
2017

An evaluation of the Community Catalysts project in Somerset. Community Catalysts is a social enterprise working across the UK to make sure that people who need care and support to live their lives can get help in ways, times and places that suit them, with real choice of attractive local options. In Somerset, the project aimed to increase the number of flexible, responsive, high quality local services and supports that can give people real choice and control over their care. As part of the project Community Catalysts has worked with partners to develop the Community Somerset Community Micro-enterprise Directory. The directory features 275 community-enterprises all of whom offer services linked to health, care or wellbeing. 223 offer help to older people to enable them to stay at home. 58% of these providers offer personal care services, including for people with more complex care needs. This care is often provided alongside home help, domestic and social support. 42% offer home help type services including support, companionship, domestic help, gardening, cleaning, trips out, transport. 3,500 hours of care a week are delivered by Community micro-enterprises in Somerset. Community Catalysts also undertook a survey of 45 families who have used both a micro-provider and a traditional domiciliary agency. The results showed that community micro-providers are able to deliver strong and valued outcomes for the people they support, and significantly outperform traditional domiciliary care delivery. The evaluation indicates that 32 community micro-enterprises in rural West Somerset are delivering £134,712 in annual savings. Projected across the 223 micro-enterprises supported by Community Catalysts in Somerset, the project delivers: £938,607 in annual savings; 56% of people supported use direct payments, showing £525,619 of direct and ongoing annual savings to the council.

Building bridges to a good life: a review of asset based, person centred approaches and people with learning disabilities in Scotland

McNEISH Di, SCOTT Sarah, WILLIAMS Jennie
2016

This review explores the potential to join up thinking on increased choice and control for people with learning disabilities and the principles of asset based working. Commissioned by the Scottish Commission for Learning Disability, it considers the efficacy of asset based approaches for people with learning disabilities, looks at evidence of the impact these approaches can have on people’s lives and also identifies examples of good practice in Scotland. The review draws on the results of a literature review; interviews with key informants involved in asset based working and learning disability services; and a mapping of projects using asset based principles with people with learning disabilities across Scotland. The results suggest that there are is reason why the focus of assets work cannot be broadened to include opportunities for people with learning disabilities. However it suggests that asset based approaches should be seen in the context of efforts to advance the personalisation and social integration agendas, and that if that they need to fit alongside services, support systems and initiatives. Examples included in the review illustrate how services can add to the assets of individuals and communities, provided they are willing and committed to relating to people and doing things differently. Factors identified that facilitate asset based approaches with people with learning disabilities, include: addressing wider inequalities and stigma; ensuring people with learning disabilities are active participants in place based community development; and tackling attitudinal barriers and established ways of doing things.

Due North: the report of the Inquiry on Health Equity for the North

INQUIRY PANEL ON HEALTH EQUITY FOR THE NORTH OF ENGLAND
2014

This inquiry report sets out a series of strategic and practical policy recommendations to address the social inequalities in health that exist both within the North of England, and between the North and the rest of England. The inquiry, commissioned by Public Health England, was led by an independent Review Panel of leading academics, policy makers and practitioners from the North of England. The report identifies the main causes of the of health inequalities within and between North and South to be differences in the: poverty, power and resources needed for health; exposure to health damaging environments, such as poorer living and working conditions and unemployment; chronic disease and disability; and differences in opportunities to enjoy positive health factors and protective conditions that help maintain health, such as good quality early years education; control over decisions that affect your life; social support and feeling part of the society. The report provides recommendations on what agencies and central government need to do to reduce these inequalities. They cover: tackling poverty and economic inequality; promoting healthy development in early childhood; sharing power over resources and increasing the influence that the public has on how resources are used to improve the determinants of health and developing the capacity of communities to participate in local decision-making; and strengthen the role of the health sector in promoting health equity.

Developing an asset based approach within a learning community: using end of life care as an example

NATIONAL COUNCIL FOR PALLIATIVE CARE
2017

The aim of the report is to be a practical guide to help extend the asset based approach already existing in end of life care into a learning and development model. Part one forms a short summary of the findings of a project that looked at ways to build a more sustainable asset based approach to workforce development and provides detail on what an asset based approach can look like and what factors need to be in place, incorporating lessons learnt, case studies and tips from those who have already explored the approach. It also contains examples of innovative resources that can be used to support learning facilitators. Part two looks at the project brief from which the practical guide originated, the methodology and the underpinning literature. It provides additional case studies and further detail on the work of Dying Matters and Dementia Friends, both networks bringing together communities to support end of life care raising awareness activities, which also offer valuable opportunities for workforce learning and development.

Unlocking the value of VCSE organisations for improving population health and wellbeing: the commissioners role

ATTARD Jessica
2017

This commissioners guide sets out a variety of approaches to working with the voluntary, community and social enterprise sector in order to create additional capacity for improving health and care that is person-centred and community-based. These approaches include adapting current commissioning processes, engaging the VCSE sector to develop more sustainable business models, and creating an environment within which new VCSE organisations or initiatives can be further developed and ‘spun-out’ to fill unmet needs. Based on interviews and learning from across the health and care system, the guide draws together examples of where this is already working well including examples from across London. It is particularly relevant for commissioners and service transformation and improvement leads delivering place-based care, public health and prevention, social prescribing, asset-based approaches and community development.

Asset-based commissioning: better outcomes, better value

FIELD Richard, MILLER Clive
2017

This publication provides an overview of asset-based practice and looks at the development of asset-aware and asset-based commissioning. It makes the case for adopting asset-based commissioning to improve outcomes for individuals and the community and outlines the implications for stakeholders, systems, behaviours and relationships of making this change. Asset-based commissioning is an approach which enables people and communities to become equal co-commissioners and co-producers and make the best use of all assets. The publication includes many examples of past and current innovations and looks at how they could be further developed and implemented at scale to achieve improved, economic, environmental and social outcomes. Key sections: look at the development of asset-based practice, its key principles and the role played by user-led organisations, personalisation, co-production and self-help ; examine how commissioning has evolved over the last three decades and how the current model is moving towards asset-based commissioning; and describe the paradigm shift involved in moving from conventional to asset-based commissioning and synthesises a wide range of asset-based commissioning practices into a unified model. The final section provides a guide to where and how to get started in developing asset-based commissioning and explores how to do this at scale.

Building bridges: bringing councils, communities and independent funders into dialogue

GILBERT Abigail
2017

This report highlights the need for collaboration between local organisations and local government in order to secure the wellbeing of communities at a time of increasing pressure facing local government budgets and increasing demand for services. The report found that councils need to work more closely with other funders of civil society, and communities, to enable change. It shows that effective collaboration between independent funders and local government can result in more intelligent, inclusive commissioning, more innovation at scale, better distribution and use of assets within localities, and more participation and engagement with communities. It also identifies potential barriers to collaboration, which include: a lack of a shared sense of purpose; a lack of consensus on what effective prevention looks like; and both councils and funders wanting to maintain their independence and reputation. The report makes a number of recommendations to improve collaboration. These include: for local authorities to have a senior officer responsible for developing funding; for elected members to building bridges between the council and independent funders; and for independent funders, such as charitable trusts, to work collaboratively with councils in order to define what ‘good’ service delivery looks like. Although the evidence for this report is focused on London, many of the findings and messages will be relevant to a wider audience.

The place of kindness: combating loneliness and building stronger communities

FERGUSON Zoe
2017

Reports on the second stage of a project to explore what can encourage kinder communities at a time when isolation and loneliness are recognised as major challenges. The project was carried out by the Carnegie UK Trust with the support of Joseph Rowntree Foundation, It worked with seven organisations in Scotland over a period of nine months, exploring the importance of places and opportunities to connect, and the intrinsic values that underpin interactions and relationships. This report identifies examples which show how kindness and everyday relationships can affect change and support the wellbeing of individuals and communities. It also identifies key factors that get in the way of encouraging kindness both in individuals and organisations. These include real and imagined rules relating to risk; funders and policy makers valuing the formal and organisational over the informal and individual; and modern definitions of professionalism and good leadership obscuring every day and intuitive human interactions. Examples of the work carried out by the seven organisations are included in the appendices.

Results 31 - 40 of 85

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
View more: News
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