#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#

Find prevention records by subject or service provider/commissioner name

  • Key to icons

    • Journal Prevention service example
    • Book Book
    • Digital media Digital media
    • Journal Journal article
    • Free resource Free resource

Results for 'cost effectiveness'

Results 31 - 40 of 53

Health and digital: reducing inequalities, improving society. An evaluation of the Widening Digital Participation programme

TINDER FOUNDATION
2016

Evaluation of the Tinder Foundation and NHS England Widening Digital Participation programme, which set out to improve the digital health skills of people in hard-to-reach communities in order to help them take charge of their own heath. It aimed to ensure that health inequalities resulting from digital exclusion do not become more pronounced. The programme involved: building a Digital Health Information network of local providers who provided face-to-face support to help people improve their skills; developing digital health information; supporting people to access health information online and learn how to complete digital medical transactions; and funding Innovation Pathfinder organisations to test innovative approaches to help people improve their digital health skills. This report evaluates the key figures and learning from the final year of the project and also provides a summary of the key findings across the three-year programme. It discusses the scale and impact of behaviour change on frontline services; priority audiences participating, including people with dementia and people with learning disabilities; and new models of care. The evaluation found that during the duration of the project 221,941 people were trained to use digital health resources. This has resulted in more people using the internet as their first port of call for information, and potential savings from reduced GP and A&E visits. The report estimates that the combined annual cost savings of reduced visits to GPs and A&E comes to approximately £6 millon against an NHS investment of £810,000 in year three.

The economic value of Dorset POPP services. A focus on two significant issues: malnutrition and fire safety

HARFLETT Naomi, et al
2016

An economic analysis of three schemes from Dorset Partnership for Older People Projects (POPP), focusing on their value and effectiveness in preventing malnutrition and preventing fire related injuries. Dorset POPP schemes use a community led preventative approach and aim to improve the quality of life of older people and to save money by preventing ineffective use of publicly funded services. The report uses published figures of the costs of malnutrition and the economic value of preventing fire injuries and applies the figure to contact monitoring and costs data from three of the Dorset POPP projects to provide an estimate of the potential economic value. The schemes are: the Wayfinder Programme, which provides signposting and support on services such as welfare benefits and pensions, retaining independent living, social activities, telecare and lunch clubs; the Community Initiatives Commissioning Fund (CICF), which funds initiatives identified by local people such as lunch clubs, social clubs, and neighbourcare schemes; and Safe And Independent Living (SAIL) multi-agency referral scheme, which provides a multi-agency referral approach to enabling access to signposting, support, and services. For all of the interventions included in the analysis, just a very small proportion (often less than one per cent) of the contacts or referrals made would be needed to prevent malnutrition or fire related injuries, in order to save money.

What role can local and national supportive services play in supporting independent and healthy living in individuals 65 and over?

WINDLE Karen
2015

This report explores the evidence base around effective and cost-effective preventative services and the role that they can play in supporting older people’s independence, health and wellbeing. It looks at the available evidence to support the benefits of preventative services in mitigating social inclusion and loneliness and improving physical health. It also highlights evidence on the effectiveness of information, advice and signposting in helping people access preventative services and the benefits of providing practical interventions such as minor housing repairs. It considers a wide range of primary and secondary preventative services, including: health screening, vaccinations, day services, reablement, and care coordination and management. It then outlines two teritary prevention services which aim to prevent imminent admission to acute health settings. These are community based rapid response services and ambulatory emergency care units, which operation within the secondary care environment. The report then highlights gaps in the evidence base and and looks at what is needed to develop preventative services to achieve health and independent ageing by 2013. It looks at the changes needed in service funding and commissioning, the balance between individual responsibility and organisational support, and how preventative services should be implemented.

Evidence to inform the commissioning of social prescribing

UNIVERSITY OF YORK. Centre for Reviews and Dissemination
2015

Summarises the findings of a rapid appraisal of available evidence on the effectiveness of social prescribing. Social prescribing is a way of linking patients in primary care with sources of support within the community, and can be used to improve health and wellbeing. For the review searches were conducted on the databases: DARE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and NHS EED for relevant systematic reviews and economic evaluations. Additional searches were also carried out on MEDLINE, ASSIA, Social Policy and Practice, NICE, SCIE and NHS. Very little good quality evidence was identified. Most available evidence described evaluations of pilot projects but failed to provide sufficient detail to judge either success or value for money. The briefing calls for better evaluation of new schemes. It recommends that evaluation should be of a comparative design; examine for whom and how well a scheme works; the effect it has and its costs.

Prevention: a shared commitment: making the case for a Prevention Transformation Fund

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2015

This document identifies and collates key pieces of evidence about the cost effectiveness of prevention in order to make the case for greater investment in prevention interventions. The report recommends that the Government should introduce a Prevention Transformation Fund, worth at least £2 billion annually. This would enable some double running of new investment in preventative services alongside ‘business as usual’ in the current system, until savings can be realised and reinvested into the system – as part of wider local prevention strategies. Based on the analysis of an extensive range of intervention case studies that have provided a net cost benefit, the report suggests that investment in prevention could yield a net return of 90 per cent.

Peer support for people with dementia: a social return on investment (SROI) study

SEMPLE Amy, WILLIS Elizabeth, de WAAL Hugo
2015

Reports on a study using Social Return on Investment (SROI) analysis to examine the impact and social value of peer support groups as an intervention for people with dementia. Three peer support groups in South London participated in the study. A separate SROI analysis was carried out for each individual group to find out what people valued about the groups and how they helped them. The report presents the outcomes for each group, the indicators for evidencing these outcomes and the quality and duration of outcomes experienced. It then provides detail on the methodology used to calculate the impact and the social return on investment. Overall, the study found that peer support groups provide positive outcomes for people with dementia, their carers and the volunteers who support the groups. The benefits of participating in peer support groups included: reduced isolation and loneliness; increased stimulation, including mental stimulation; and increased wellbeing. Carers experienced a reduction in carer stress, carer burden and reduction in the feeling of loneliness. Volunteers had an increased sense of wellbeing through their engagement with the group, improved knowledge of dementia and gained transferrable skills. Overall the study found that for every pound (£) of investment the social value created by the three groups evaluated ranged from £1.17 to £5.18.

Creating a better care system: setting out key considerations for a reformed, sustainable health, wellbeing and care system of the future

ERNST AND YOUNG
2015

In this report, commissioned by the Local Government Association, a journey towards better health and care for individuals is set out; driven by local system leaders and supported by a more empowering and enabling system. The report has been developed through: a review of existing literature published by partners, charities and research organisations; four workshops with the LGA and partners to define the vision, understand the system barriers from a range of perspectives and describe the required changes; and further discussion with regional contacts and the Health Transformation Task Group to sense check that barriers and key considerations are locally relevant and reflect the experience in local areas. Section 1 sets out a vision for better care and support, arguing that a reformed system needs to deliver: better health and wellbeing more equally enjoyed; better choice and control for all; better quality care, tailored for each person; and better outcomes for each pound spent. Section 2 focuses on key barriers preventing the achievement of a reformed system. These include: creating dependency through the way treatment is provided; chronic underfunding of the system and a lack of capacity to transform; fragmented commissioning incentivising treatment over demand management; and national regulations that disempower local areas. Section 3 sets out four steps to better care, which are: put people in control; fund services adequately and in an aligned way; devolve power to join up care, support and wellbeing; and free the system from national constraints. The report concludes that collectively these steps will enable localities to address challenges, deliver a better system and ultimately drive better outcomes and greater sustainability for all.

Making the case for public health interventions: public health spending and return on investment

KING'S FUND, LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2014

These infographics from the King's Fund and the Local Government Association set out key facts about the public health system and the return on investment for some public health interventions. They show the changing demographics with a growing ageing population and the impact of social and behavioural determinants on people’s health. The document also highlights the costs of key health and social services and estimates the potential returns on investment on preventative interventions. For instance, Birmingham’s Be Active programme of free use of leisure centres and other initiatives returned an estimated £23 in quality of life, reduced NHS use and other gains for every £1 spent. Every £1 spent on improving homes saves the NHS £70 over 10 years. Befriending services have been estimated to pay back around £3.75 in reduced mental health service spending and improvements in health for every £1 spent. Every £1 spent on drugs treatment saves society £2.50 in reduced NHS and social care costs and reduced crime.

Micro-enterprises: small enough to care?

NEEDHAM Catherine, et al
2015

Outlines the findings of an evaluation of micro-enterprises in social care in England, which ran from 2013 to 2015. The report focuses on very small organisations, here defined as having five members of staff or fewer, which provide care and support to adults with an assessed social care need. The research design encompassed a local asset-based approach, working with co-researchers with experience of care in the three localities. Twenty seven organisations took part in the study overall, including 17 micro-providers, whose performance was compared to that of 4 small, 4 medium and 2 large providers. A total of 143 people were interviewed for the project. The study found that: micro-providers offer more personalised support than larger providers, particularly for home-based care; they deliver more valued outcomes than larger providers, in relation to helping people do more of the things they value and enjoy; they are better than larger providers at some kinds of innovation, being more flexible and able to provide support to marginalised communities; and they offer better value for money than larger providers. Factors that help micro-providers to emerge and become sustainable include: dedicated support for start-up and development, strong personal networks within a localities, and balancing good partnerships (including with local authorities) with maintaining an independent status. Inhibiting factors, on the other hand, include a reliance on self-funders and the financial fragility of the organisation. The report makes the following recommendations: commissioners should develop different approaches to enable micro-enterprises to join preferred provider lists; social care teams should promote flexible payment options for people wanting to use micro-enterprises, including direct payments; social workers and other care professionals need to be informed about micro-enterprises operating close-by so that they can refer people to them; regulators need to ensure that their processes are proportional and accessible for very small organisations; and micro-enterprises need access to dedicated start-up support, with care sector expertise, as well as ongoing support and peer networks.

Going home alone: counting the cost to older people and the NHS

ROYAL VOLUNTARY SERVICE
2014

Assesses the impact of home from hospital services, which focus on supporting older people in their homes following a stay in hospital and seek to reduce the likelihood that they will need to be readmitted to hospital. The report brings together the findings of a literature review (as well as discussions with relevant experts), the results of the survey of 401 people aged 75 or over who had spent at least one night in hospital on one or more occasions within the past five years, and the outputs from a cost-impact analysis using national data and results from the survey. It sets out the policy context in England, Scotland and Wales, with its focus on preventive care, better integration of health and care services, and on shifting care away from the hospital into homes and communities. It then discusses the demand drivers for these schemes, including the ageing population, the growth in hospital readmissions, and decreasing length of stay. The report examines the experiences of older people after leaving hospital, looking at admissions, discharge, need for support following discharge, and type and duration of support. It suggests that home from hospital schemes can help to improve the well-being of their users and to reduce social isolation and loneliness and the number of hospital readmissions, as well as demand for other health and care services. The results of the cost-impact analysis suggest that, were home from hospital schemes appropriately targeted and effective in addressing ‘excess admissions’, they may produce a saving for the NHS of £40.4m per year.

Results 31 - 40 of 53

#EXCLUDE#
Ask about support on integration, STPs and transformation
ENQUIRE
News

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project New practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
View more: News
Related SCIE content
Related external content
Visit Social Care Online, the UK’s largest database of information and research on all aspects of social care and social work.
SEARCH NOW
Submit prevention service example
SUBMIT
What do you think about SCIE's work?
FEEDBACK
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#