#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#

Find prevention records by subject or service provider/commissioner name

  • Key to icons

    • Journal Prevention service example
    • Book Book
    • Digital media Digital media
    • Journal Journal article
    • Free resource Free resource

Results for 'costs'

Results 1 - 10 of 19

Evaluation of the Homeshare pilots: final report

TRAVERSE, MACMILLAN Tarran, et al
2018

The final evaluation report of Homeshare pilots programme (HSP), which looks at what works to develop a sustainable Homeshare scheme. Homeshare schemes bring together older people who need support to stay in their homes, with young people who provide companionship and low level support in return for an affordable place to live. The evaluation, commissioned by SCIE and conducted by Traverse, identifies which approaches and activities work best, barriers to successful schemes, cost and benefits, and identifies factors that to be used by commissioners to assess bids for Homeshare schemes. It draws on qualitative interviews with pilot leads and staff, local authority stakeholders, referral agencies and with householders and homesharers from the first matches achieved in three HSP sites. It covers experiences of living in a Homeshare, operating a sustainable Homeshare scheme, referral and sustainability, and highlights broader learning for the social care and housing sectors. The results show how that Homeshare can reduce loneliness and improve wellbeing by offering companionship and facilitating inter-generational relationships, as well as addressing the lack of affordable housing options. The report concludes that the programme has been successful in supporting the development of Homeshare sites and provided learning in what works in supporting innovation within delivery of social and housing support.

Quantifying the benefits of peer support for people with dementia: a social return on investment (SROI) study

WILLIS Elizabeth, SEMPLE Amy C., de WAAL Hugo
2018

Objective: Peer support for people with dementia and carers is routinely advocated in national strategies and policy as a post-diagnostic intervention. However there is limited evidence to demonstrate the value these groups offer. This study looked at three dementia peer support groups in South London to evaluate what outcomes they produce and how much social value they create in relation to the cost of investment. Methods: A Social Return on Investment (SROI) analysis was undertaken, which involves collecting data on the inputs, outputs and outcomes of an intervention, which are put into a formula, the end result being a SROI ratio showing how much social value is created per £1 of investment. Results: Findings showed the three groups created social value ranging from £1.17 to £5.18 for every pound (£) of investment, dependent on the design and structure of the group. Key outcomes for people with dementia were mental stimulation and a reduction in loneliness and isolation. Carers reported a reduction in stress and burden of care. Volunteers cited an increased knowledge of dementia. Conclusions: This study has shown that peer groups for people with dementia produce a social value greater than the cost of investment which provides encouraging evidence for those looking to commission, invest, set up or evaluate peer support groups for people with dementia and carers. Beyond the SROI ratio, this study has shown these groups create beneficial outcomes not only for the group members but also more widely for their carers and the group volunteers.

Investing to tackle loneliness: a discussion paper

SOCIAL FINANCE
2015

This paper describes work undertaken with Age UK Herefordshire and Worcestershire to design a service that addresses loneliness, particularly among older people. The first half of the paper examines the potential costs of loneliness and the potential value to the public sector of reducing loneliness. The second half of the paper describes the outcomes-based model used in Worcestershire and sets out initial findings of the service. The service uses a model of commissioning services through a Social Impact Bond (SIB), a contract in which commissioners commit to pay investors for an improvement in social outcomes. The paper sets out some of the benefits of using social investment to fund the upfront cost of delivering a service to reduce loneliness. It also discusses the following elements of the model: measuring loneliness and additional outcomes, delivering support to the population most at risk, considering social investment and agreeing a payment mechanism.

Social prescribing: less rhetoric and more reality. A systematic review of the evidence

BICKERDIKE Liz, et al
2017

Objectives: Social prescribing is a way of linking patients in primary care with sources of support within the community to help improve their health and well-being. Social prescribing programmes are being widely promoted and adopted in the UK National Health Service and this systematic review aims to assess the evidence for their effectiveness. Setting/data sources: Nine databases were searched from 2000 to January 2016 for studies conducted in the UK. Relevant reports and guidelines, websites and reference lists of retrieved articles were scanned to identify additional studies. All the searches were restricted to English language only. Participants: Systematic reviews and any published evaluation of programmes where patient referral was made from a primary care setting to a link worker or facilitator of social prescribing were eligible for inclusion. Risk of bias for included studies was undertaken independently by two reviewers and a narrative synthesis was performed. Primary and secondary outcome measures: Primary outcomes of interest were any measures of health and well-being and/or usage of health services. Results: A total of 15 evaluations of social prescribing programmes were included. Most were small scale and limited by poor design and reporting. All were rated as a having a high risk of bias. Common design issues included a lack of comparative controls, short follow-up durations, a lack of standardised and validated measuring tools, missing data and a failure to consider potential confounding factors. Despite clear methodological shortcomings, most evaluations presented positive conclusions. Conclusions: Social prescribing is being widely advocated and implemented but current evidence fails to provide sufficient detail to judge either success or value for money. If social prescribing is to realise its potential, future evaluations must be comparative by design and consider when, by whom, for whom, how well and at what cost.

The social value of sheltered housing: briefing paper

WOOD Claudia
2017

Drawing on the findings from a review of evidence on the impact of sheltered housing for older people, this briefing paper provides estimates of the cost savings sheltered housing can achieve for health and social care. The paper gives a conservative estimate of a social value saving made by sheltered housing of nearly half a billion pounds. This figure takes into account costs saved through a reduction in the number of falls by older people, the time spent in hospital, combating loneliness, as well as fewer unnecessary call-outs to emergency services. The paper was commissioned to help Anchor, Hanover and Housing & Care 21 consider the future of sheltered housing.

A very general practice: how much time do GPs spend on issues other than health

CAPER Kathleen, PLUNKETT James
2015

Drawing on the results of interviews with 824 general practitioners (GPs) in England carried out in 2015, this briefing looks at the amount of time and money GPs spend dealing with non-health issues. GPs responding to the survey report spending almost a fifth of their time on social issues that are not principally about health, including relationship problems, housing, unemployment and social isolation. This time has an implied cost to the health service of almost £400 million a year. Although approximately half the GPs surveyed said that time spent on non-health issues helped them understand their local community, this can leave less time for other patients' health care needs. In addition, many issues raised with GPs, require specialist knowledge that many GPs do not have. Whist the report acknowledges that discussion of non-health issues can be helpful in developing GP-patient relationships, it concludes that finding other ways to meet some of the non-health demand facing GPs would free up time and money to be reinvested in patient care. Possible suggestions put forward include the co-locating of non-health services and advice services in GP surgeries and ensuring GPs know how to best signpost patients to other local services in the community.

Does integrated care reduce hospital activity for patients with chronic diseases? An umbrella review of systematic reviews

DAMERY Sarah, FLANAGAN Sarah, COMBES Gill
2016

Objective: To summarise the evidence regarding the effectiveness of integrated care interventions in reducing hospital activity. Design: Umbrella review of systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Setting: Interventions must have delivered care crossing the boundary between at least two health and/or social care settings. Participants: Adult patients with one or more chronic diseases. Data sources: MEDLINE, Embase, ASSIA, PsycINFO, HMIC, CINAHL, Cochrane Library (HTA database,DARE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews), EPPI-Centre, TRIP, HEED, manual screening of references. Outcome measures: Any measure of hospital admission or readmission, length of stay (LoS), accident and emergency use, healthcare costs. Results: 50 reviews were included. Interventions focused on case management (n=8), chronic care model (CCM) (n=9), discharge management (n=15), complex interventions (n=3), multidisciplinary teams (MDT) (n=10) and self-management (n=5). 29 reviews reported statistically significant improvements in at least one outcome. 11/21 reviews reported significantly reduced emergency admissions (15–50%); 11/24 showed significant reductions in all-cause (10–30%) or condition-specific (15–50%) readmissions; 9/16 reported LoS reductions of 1–7 days and 4/9 showed significantly lower A&E use (30–40%). 10/25 reviews reported significant cost reductions but provided little robust evidence. Effective interventions included discharge management with post-discharge support, MDT care with teams that include condition-specific expertise, specialist nurses and/or pharmacists and self-management as an adjunct to broader interventions. Interventions were most effective when targeting single conditions such as heart failure, and when care was provided in patients’ homes. Conclusions: Although all outcomes showed some significant reductions, and a number of potentially effective interventions were found, interventions rarely demonstrated unequivocally positive effects. Despite the centrality of integrated care to current policy, questions remain about whether the magnitude of potentially achievable gains is enough to satisfy national targets for reductions in hospital activity.

The homecare deficit 2016: a report on the funding of older people’s homecare across the United Kingdom

UNITED KINGDOM HOMECARE ASSOCIATION
2016

Drawing on data obtained from freedom of information requests, this report analyses average prices paid by councils for home care services across all four administrations of the United Kingdom. It also provides a breakdown by England’s nine government regions. The data were obtained during a sample week in April 2016 following the introduction of the new National Living Wage. The analysis found that only one in ten authorities paid an average price at or above UKHCA’s minimum price of £16.70 per hour. It also found that seven authorities paid average prices which the UKHCA believe are unlikely even to cover care workers’ wages and on-costs of £11.94 per hour. Only 24 councils had completed calculations for the costs of home care. The report highlights the low rates that many councils are paying independent and voluntary homecare providers. It argues that this underfunding is a root cause of the instability of local homecare markets and the low pay and conditions of the homecare workforce. The analysis also exposes the level of risk that councils place on a system intended to support older and disabled people. The report makes a number of recommendations, which include the need for local authorities to provide calculations of their costs of homecare.

Implementing the Five Year Forward View for Mental Health

NHS ENGLAND
2016

Implementation plan which outlines a roadmap for delivering the commitments made in the Five Year Forward View for Mental Health to people who use services and the public in order to improve care. It prioritises objectives for delivery by 2020/21 and is intended as a blueprint for the changes that NHS staff, other organisations and other parts of the system can make. Key principles of the plan include co-production, working in partnership with local public, private and voluntary sector organisations; early interventions and delivering person-centred care. The plan also gives a clear indication to the public and people who use services what they can expect from the NHS, and when. It also outlines future funding commitments, shows how the workforce requirements will be delivered in these priority areas, and how data and payment will support transparency. Separate sections cover: children and young people’s mental health; perinatal mental health; adult mental health – including community, acute, crisis care and secure care; mental health and justice, and suicide prevention. These individual chapters set out national-level objectives, costs and planning assumptions. Chapters also describe cross-cutting work to help sustain transformation, including testing new models of care and ensuring the health and wellbeing of the NHS workforce.

The economic value of Dorset POPP services. A focus on two significant issues: malnutrition and fire safety

HARFLETT Naomi, et al
2016

An economic analysis of three schemes from Dorset Partnership for Older People Projects (POPP), focusing on their value and effectiveness in preventing malnutrition and preventing fire related injuries. Dorset POPP schemes use a community led preventative approach and aim to improve the quality of life of older people and to save money by preventing ineffective use of publicly funded services. The report uses published figures of the costs of malnutrition and the economic value of preventing fire injuries and applies the figure to contact monitoring and costs data from three of the Dorset POPP projects to provide an estimate of the potential economic value. The schemes are: the Wayfinder Programme, which provides signposting and support on services such as welfare benefits and pensions, retaining independent living, social activities, telecare and lunch clubs; the Community Initiatives Commissioning Fund (CICF), which funds initiatives identified by local people such as lunch clubs, social clubs, and neighbourcare schemes; and Safe And Independent Living (SAIL) multi-agency referral scheme, which provides a multi-agency referral approach to enabling access to signposting, support, and services. For all of the interventions included in the analysis, just a very small proportion (often less than one per cent) of the contacts or referrals made would be needed to prevent malnutrition or fire related injuries, in order to save money.

Results 1 - 10 of 19

#EXCLUDE#
Ask about support on integration, STPs and transformation
ENQUIRE
News

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project New practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
View more: News
Related SCIE content
Related external content
Visit Social Care Online, the UK’s largest database of information and research on all aspects of social care and social work.
SEARCH NOW
Submit prevention service example
SUBMIT
What do you think about SCIE's work?
FEEDBACK
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#