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Results for 'dementia'

Results 1 - 10 of 61

Non-pharmacological interventions for people with dementia: a review of reviews

MEYER Claudia, O'KEEFE Fleur
2018

Objective: Aged care services increasingly respond to the needs of people with dementia. Non-pharmacological approaches are preferable to reduce responsive behaviours, improve/maintain functional capacity and reduce emotional disorders. This rapid review of systematic reviews aimed to consolidate the evidence for non-pharmacological interventions and determine outcome effectiveness. Methods: Systematic review literature was comprehensively searched for non-pharmacological interventions for dementia in residential care. Quality ratings used adapted GRADE methodology, and ease of implementation assessed. Results: Of 629 abstracts screened, 81 full-text articles were retrieved, 38 articles included. The strongest evidence for reducing responsive behaviours was music, sensory stimulation, simulated presence and validation therapies. Exercise and light therapy improved/maintained activities of daily living, while cognitive stimulation and reminiscence improved cognition. Strongest evidence for reducing emotional disorders was music, psychological interventions and reminiscence. Conclusion: Much evidence of varying quality exists, with resource-constrained residential care providers now able to make evidence-based decisions about non-pharmacological interventions.

‘Now he sings’. the my musical memories reminiscence programme: personalised interactive reminiscence sessions for people living with dementia

EVANS Simon C., GARABEDIAN Claire, BRAY Jennifer
2019

This paper explores the impact of the My Musical Memories Reminiscence Programme (MMMRP), an innovative intervention that adopts a music-based reminiscence approach. MMMRP builds on the format of the popular Singing for the Brain sessions with the aim of increasing opportunities for interaction and reminiscence amongst people living with dementia. Data were collected pre- and post-intervention and three months later using structured observation, interviews and focus groups. Results suggest that the programme had a positive impact on participants by promoting engagement, reminiscence and social interaction. For some individuals the impacts continued beyond their participation in the programme. A range of key facilitators for successful implementation of this approach were identified including the Session Leader role, the involvement of informal carers and the input of volunteers.

A menu of interventions for productive healthy ageing: for pharmacy teams working in different settings

PUBLIC HEALTH ENGLAND
2019

This guide lists interventions that pharmacy teams working in different healthcare settings can use to support older people to improve the quality of their lives. It includes evidence-based interventions on: preventing and reducing falls; increasing levels of physical activity; maintaining a healthy weight and preventing malnutrition; reducing the risk of social isolation and loneliness; reducing the risk of dementia; supporting people diagnosed with dementia; delaying the progress of dementia and reducing the need for medicines. For each area the guide includes the rationale for intervention, a list of suggested interventions and evidence of impact. The guidance will also be useful for pharmaceutical and medical committees, local authorities, clinical commissioning groups and local NHS England teams.

Animal magic: the benefits of being around and caring for animals across care settings

CARE INSPECTORATE
2019

A collection of case studies which show how being around and caring for animals can benefit many children and adults using a range of care services. It shows how animals and pets can enhance the quality of life of children and adults by helping with relaxation, providing companionship, enhancing relationships, providing a positive focus to people's lives, and encouraging people to be active and making them feel happier. Contact with animals can also enhance relationships with their families, their friends and with care professionals - promoting a culture of kindness for people of all ages. The case studies include examples from very sheltered housing support, fostering services, homeless hostels, dementia care, and care homes. Each case study is annotated with details of relevant Scottish Health and Social Care Standards (Dignity and respect, Compassion, Be included, Responsive care and support, and Wellbeing) and Getting it Right for Every Child (GIRFEC) wellbeing indicators that apply to the example.

The impact of attending day care designed for home-dwelling people with dementia on nursing home admission: a 24-month controlled study

ROKSTAD Anne Marie Mork, et al
2018

Background: Day care services offer meaningful activities, a safe environment for attendees and respite for family caregivers while being expected to delay the need for nursing home (NH) admission. However, previous research has shown inconsistent results regarding postponement of NH admission. The objective of the study was to explore the influence of a day care programme designed for home-dwelling people with dementia on NH admission. Method: A quasi-experimental trial explored the proportion of patients permanently admitted to nursing homes after 24 months as the main outcome by comparing a group of day care attendees (DG) and a group of participants without day care (CG). In all, 257 participants were included (181 in DG and 76 in CG). A logistic regression model was developed with NH admission as the outcome. Participant group (DG or CG) was the main predictor, baseline patient and family caregiver characteristics and interactions were used as covariates. Results: The mean age of participants was 81.5 (SD 6.4), 65% were women and 53% lived alone. The mean MMSE score was 20.4 (SD 3.5). In all, 128 (50%) of the participants were admitted to a nursing home by the 24-month follow-up, 63 participants (25%) completed the follow-up assessment and 66 (26%) dropped out due to death (8%) and other reasons (18%). In the logistic unadjusted regression model for NH admission after 24 months, participant group (DG or CG) was not found to be a significant predictor of NH admission. The results from the adjusted model revealed that the participant group was associated with NH admission through the interactions with age, living conditions, affective symptoms, sleep symptoms and practical functioning, showing a higher probability for NH admission in DG compared to CG. Conclusion: The study reveals no evidence to confirm that day care services designed for people with dementia postpone the need for NH admission. Admission to nursing homes seems to be based on a complex mix of personal and functional characteristics both in the person with dementia and the family caregivers. The findings should be considered in accordance with the limitation of inadequate power and the high drop-out rate.

A feasibility study of facilitated reminiscence for people living with dementia: report

RYAN Assumpta, et al
2018

Reports on a feasibility study to investigate the effects of a home based, individual reminiscence intervention using an iPad app for people living with dementia and their family carers. The study design had three phases. Phase 1: A User Development Group comprising a paired sample of 6 people living with dementia and their family carers who worked with the research team to design and test the technology; Phase 2: Testing of the developed app with a paired sample of 30 people living with mild to moderate dementia and their family carers (n=60). Participants used the app for 12 weeks at home. Questionnaires which examined the impact of reminiscence on mutuality, wellbeing, quality of life and quality of the relationship between participants living with dementia and their family carers were collected at the beginning, middle and end points of the study. Health economics data were also collected to understand cost effectiveness. Phase 3: Individual interviews with a sample of participants (n=32) to explore their experience of the intervention. The results found that people living with dementia used the app independently and more frequently than their carers. They also showed an increase in the quality of caregiving relationships and emotional well‐being for people living with dementia. Although there was no significant change for carers over the course of the study, the intervention improved the caring relationship and was seen as an enjoyable way to care for themselves and their loved one.

'What would life be: without a song or a dance, what are we?' A report from the Commission on Dementia and Music

BOWELL Sally, BAMFORD Sally-Marie
2018

This report examines the current landscape of using therapeutic music with people with dementia, outlines the value and benefits of music therapy, and looks at what needs to be done to ensure that everyone with dementia is able to access music. Informed by the Commission on Dementia and Music, the report brings together a wide range of evidence, including academic papers, written and oral evidence, and evidence from site visits. The evidence shows that music can help to minimise symptoms of dementia, such as agitation and can help tackle anxiety and depression. Evidence also shows that music can help improves the quality of life for people with dementia by increasing social interaction and decreasing stress. The report also shows that although the dementia and music environment is supported by a dedicated network of individuals and organisations, they work in a complex and poorly coordinate system. The field is also defined by sporadic access, with only relatively few people with dementia having access. It concludes that the sector would benefit from increased funding, further cost-effective research to boost recognition and funding, and increased public awareness about the benefits of music. The report includes recommendations to help improve access to music for people with dementia.

Live music in care: the impact of music interventions for people living and working in care home settings

TAPSON Christine, et al
2018

An evaluation of a music intervention in five care homes in the UK in order to investigate the impact on older residents, staff and the care home environment. The programme, which was delivered by Live Music Now, consisted of an 11-session interactive weekly music programme focussed on singing and the use of voice, and involved training of care staff. For the evaluation, data were drawn from 15 observations of the music sessions, reflective interviews with members of the care teams, staff questionnaires and online questionnaires for those musicians taking part. Thematic analysis of the results identified six themes: the need for collaboration between care home managers, musicians and care staff in delivering music sessions; differing responses to the intervention; empowering the residents and nurturing their identity; the integral part staff, musicians and the researcher played in the success of the intervention and its evaluation; the effect of the intervention on wellbeing; and residents, care staff and managers desire to continue the sessions in the future. The report found that carefully delivered music can provide significant benefits for older people, care staff and care settings, contributing to person-centred care. It found that regular music making can improve the working and living environment for care home residents and staff, and can provide positive social experiences. Music interventions can also play a key role in awakening a sense of identity and empowerment for care home residents. The report makes several recommendations, including that regular participatory music programmes be considered essential for all UK care homes.

A society of readers

HILHORST Sacha, LOCKEY Alan, SPEIGHT Tom
2018

This report, commissioned by The Reading Agency, assesses the potential of reading to tackle the issues of loneliness, mental health problems, dementia and lack of social mobility. It looks at evidence in three short literature reviews and highlights findings from reading initiatives. It also forecasts the scale of the challenge posed by an increase in loneliness, mental health problems and dementia over the next decade without effective intervention. Findings from literature reviews suggest that reading can help to combat the growing issue of loneliness, as well as acting as a tool to protect future generations from the loneliness and can also improve common symptoms of both depression and dementia. It concludes by setting out thirteen practical reading-based policies that suggest how the Government can make the most of readings potential. These include for the Government to invest £200 million in using reading to combat loneliness and for more book-based interventions as part of a social prescribing strategy for mental health and dementia.

Dementia-friendly Brent: a model of community

TILKI Mary
2018

Report on the London borough of Brent's dynamic social movement helping to make the borough dementia friendly. Community Action on Dementia Brent (CADBrent) is a dynamic social movement that aims to make the London borough dementia friendly, accessible and inclusive of black and minority ethnic (BME) communities. Much has been achieved since the movement began five years ago. Some of the schemes discussed in the article include: Dementia peer support project; dementia friendly Mapesbury; The De-Cafe - memory cafe; Whole street of support; The Shed and Parnerships in Innovative Education.

Results 1 - 10 of 61

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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