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Results for 'dementia'

Results 1 - 10 of 49

The Me, Myself and I Club: Briton Ferry: a case study in warm humanity and meaningful co-production

ME MYSELF AND I CLUB
2018

Describes the development and achievements of the Me, Myself and I Club, an initiative based on co-production principles and designed to support people with dementia and their carers. The club offers carers and people with dementia the opportunity to meet up with other local people in their position, enjoy activities like bingo, baking and table tennis and access respite care services, including relationship-centred short breaks in the local community that do not require the separation of carers from the people they support. The ethos of the club is to challenge negative stereotypes of people with dementia and the traditional service culture which does to, rather than with people. Member of the club also recognise a need for greater understanding about dementia in the local community and are committed to raising awareness and understanding of what it feels like to be living with dementia, and how other people can be helpful not hurtful. The Club runs a Community Care Training and Volunteer Academy offering up to 12 weeks of training and 12 hours voluntary work for people considering employment in the care sector. Over the years, the Me, Myself and I Club has developed links and partnerships with a range of national and local initiatives, including the Dementia Engagement and Empowerment Project (DEEP).

Experiences of being: the benefit of drama, music and dancing in improving the wellbeing of older people in care homes

NANDAKUMARA Reva
2017

This report highlights the benefits of using drama and creative techniques with older people, in particular those with dementia. It outlines the results of an initiative which ran drama workshops in 17 Anchor care homes, with the intention that they could become a sustainable part of the activities led by the care home staff to improve the lives of residents, both physically and mentally. A professional drama teacher worked collaboratively with the staff at each care home, and provided opportunities for staff to suggest modifications to the workshops. The results highlight the mental and physical health benefits of the creative activities for care home residents and the sustainability of the methods provided by the trainer at the various care homes. The report concludes that the workshops provide a simple and effective way of improving the experience of care home residents and can easily become part of the selection of regular activities available at care homes. They are inexpensive and scalable and, led to an improvement in residents level of self-esteem and self-worth. Care staff also found that the sessions enhanced communication, giving residents the opportunity to share their knowledge and experience and talk about their lives, homes and communities.

Arts in care homes: a rapid mapping of training provision

ALLEN Penny
2018

This report uses desk research, interviews and online searches to map creative training provision available to artists and staff working in care homes in the UK. The mapping took place in 2017 and identified examples of good practice, innovative delivery, and opportunities for growth and development. It total, 65 providers of training were identified, delivering training in person or online. Training was aimed at artists, health/care providers, volunteers, arts venues, activity coordinators and friends/family. Seven main types of training opportunity identified: toolkits; one-off workshops; whole home and leadership training; maintenance models; mentoring; networks and peer learning; and conferences. The results highlight the diverse nature of the sector and the multiple pathways for people to access training, which present both challenges and opportunities for training providers. The author also highlights variation in quality of provision and argues for a system of accreditation. Case study examples are included throughout the report, and appendices provide links to a range of toolkits and providers.

Effect of horticultural therapy on wellbeing among dementia day care programme participants: a mixed-methods study

HALL Jodi, et al
2018

Fourteen people attending an adult day programme were recruited to a structured horticultural therapy programme which took place over 10 weeks. The effects were assessed using Dementia Care Mapping and questionnaires completed by family carers. High levels of wellbeing were observed while the participants were engaged in horticultural therapy, and these were sustained once the programme was completed. This study adds to the growing evidence on the benefits of horticultural therapy for people with dementia who have enjoyed gardening in the past.

Exposure to nature gardens has time-dependent associations with mood improvements for people with mid- and late-stage dementia

WHITE Piran CL., et al
2018

Exposure to green space and nature has a potential role to play in the care of people with dementia, with possible benefits including improved mood and slower disease progression. In this observational study at a dementia care facility in the UK, we used carer-assessed measures to evaluate change in mood of residents with mid- to late-stage dementia following exposure to a nature garden. We found that exposure to nature was associated with a beneficial change in patient mood. There was a non-linear relationship between time spent outdoors and mood outcome. Improvements in patient mood were associated with relatively short duration exposures to nature, and no additional measureable increases in mood were found with exposures beyond 80–90 minutes duration. Whilst further investigation is required before causality can be determined, these results raise important questions for policy about the integration of outdoor space into the design of dementia care facilities and programmes.

LAUGH research project

Cardiff Metropolitan University

The Ludic Artefacts Using Gesture & Haptics (LAUGH) research project was born out of an identified need for playful objects for people with advanced dementia and based on literature and previous research on the benefits to wellbeing of playfulness and hand-use. The aims of the project were to look at: How can handcraft and creative making inform the development of new devices and playful activities to promote individual and social wellbeing for people with dementia? And how might handcraft activities be augmented via new technologies and smart materials to produce new kinds of engaging, playful artefacts to amuse, distract, comfort, engage, bring joy, and promote ‘in the moment’ living for people with dementia?

Using dolls for therapeutic purposes: A study on nursing home residents with severe dementia

CANTARELLA A., et al
2018

Objectives: Among the psychosocial interventions intended to reduce the behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD), doll therapy (DT) is increasingly used in clinical practice. Few studies on DT have been based on empirical data obtained with an adequate procedure; however, none have assessed its efficacy using an active control group, and the scales used to assess changes in BPSD are usually unreliable. The aim of the present study was to measure the impact of DT on people with severe dementia with a reliable, commonly used scale for assessing their BPSD, and the related distress in formal caregivers. Effects of DT on the former's everyday abilities (i.e., eating behaviour) were also examined. Method: Twenty‐nine nursing home residents aged from 76 to 96 years old, with severe dementia (Alzheimer's or vascular dementia), took part in the experiment. They were randomly assigned to an experimental group that used dolls or an active control group that used hand warmers with sensory characteristics equivalent to the dolls. Benefits of DT on BPSD and related formal caregiver distress were examined with the Neuropsychiatric Inventory. The effects of DT on eating behaviour were examined with the Eating Behavior Scale. Results: Only the DT group showed a reduction in BPSD scores and related caregiver distress. DT did not benefit eating behaviour, however. Conclusions: This study suggests that DT is a promising approach for reducing BPSD in people with dementia, supporting evidence emerging from previous anecdotal studies.

LAUGH: playful objects in advanced dementia care

TREADAWAY Cathy
2018

The article reports on an international research project led by the Cardiff School of Art and Design at Cardiff Metropolitan University to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia. The aim of the project was to understand the best ways to design objects that can give pleasure and comfort to people in the advanced stages of dementia and to provide guidance for designers working in the sector. The article discusses the participatory approach to the research, testing and feedback and provides an example of one of the LAUGH objects that was found to have a significant impact on wellbeing - a comforting "Hug". The article also covers how the objects stimulate memories and some of the outcomes from the project and future direction.

The arts as a medium for care and self-care in dementia: arguments and evidence

SCHNEIDER Justine
2018

The growing prevalence of dementia, combined with an absence of effective pharmacological treatments, highlights the potential of psychosocial interventions to alleviate the effects of dementia and enhance quality of life. With reference to a manifesto from the researcher network Interdem, this paper shows how arts activities correspond to its definition of psycho-social care. It presents key dimensions that help to define different arts activities in this context, and illustrates the arts with reference to three major approaches that can be viewed online; visual art, music and dance. It goes on to discuss the features of each of these arts activities, and to present relevant evidence from systematic reviews on the arts in dementia in general. Developing the analysis into a template for differentiating arts interventions in dementia, the paper goes on to discuss implications for future research and for the uptake of the arts by people with dementia as a means to self-care.

Rethinking respite for people affected by dementia

OLDER PEOPLE'S COMMISSIONER FOR WALES
2018

This report provides evidence of how respite care for people affected by dementia can be positively transformed and aims to help policy makers, commissioners and providers to deliver change. It brings together the results of an engagement exercise with over 120 people affected by dementia, undertaken in partnership with My Home Life Cymru (Swansea University); a literature review by the University of Worcester Association for Dementia Studies; and a call for examples of practice. The report identifies key challenges facing people who need to accessing respite when they need it, covering the following themes: navigating the health and care system; availability; quality, flexibility and choice; information, advice and advocacy; meaningful occupation; home or away?; complex needs and keeping people active; safeguarding and positive risk taking; diversity; maintaining and building relationships; social inclusion and having an ‘ordinary’ life. Drawing on people’s experiences and examples from practice, it provides enablers to help overcome these barriers. The report shows that not all ‘routes to respite’ are clear to the public, there is uneven access across the country, many people feel that current options are not delivering the quality, flexibility or accessibility they need; and there were concerns that money is being spent on respite services that do not deliver meaningful outcomes. It concludes that there is a need to rethink the language and terminology around respite; make better use of the knowledge and experiences of people living with dementia and carers to develop new models of care and support; and to align the outcomes with the National Outcomes Framework. Whilst the report focuses specifically on people affected by dementia, many of the key messages will be relevant to other people who need respite.

Results 1 - 10 of 49

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LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project New practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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