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Results for 'dementia'

Results 1 - 10 of 33

Music In Mind Camerata in the Community

Manchester Camerata

Manchester Camerata’s involvement with older members of the community began almost ten years ago, in which they ran music composition sessions for people living in care homes alongside Age Friendly Manchester. Since 2012, Camerata runs a programme entitled ‘Music in Mind’, a music-therapy based project for people living with dementia and their carers. This was in response to a growing number of people living with dementia in Greater Manchester, and an interest from Camerata orchestral musicians to deliver this work in partnership with Music Therapists.

Stockton Borough Council's Multi-Disciplinary Service

Stockton Borough Council

Stockton Borough Council established a Multi-Disciplinary Service (MDS) in October 2015, as part of their Better Care Fund plan. The process of designing and implementing the service was through creating a partnership with all key stakeholders in across health, social care and the voluntary sector: Hartlepool and Stockton-on-Tees CCG - Health Commissioners; Stockton-on-Tees Borough Council - Social Care; North Tees and Hartlepool FT - Acute and Community Health; Tees Esk and Wear Valleys FT - Mental Health Trust; and the Voluntary Community and Social Enterprise sector. The executive management teams of all partner organisations signed up to the MDS and have continued to support its development though regular updates at the Joint Health and Wellbeing Board.

ExtraCare's Wellbeing Programme

The ExtraCare Charitable Trust

ExtraCare’s Wellbeing Programme was developed in 2002, in partnership with older people who live at ExtraCare’s Schemes and Villages. The concept was launched following a survey, which highlighted that 75% of residents at one location had not accessed any health screening via their GPs or the NHS. A pilot screening scheme subsequently identified 122 previously undetected conditions amongst a population of just 136, highlighting a clear need for the Programme.

Care Homes Reading Project

University of Exeter

The Exeter Care Homes Reading Project began in the English Department at Exeter University in October 2011. Pioneered by Dr Johanna Harris and strongly supported by the student-led English Society, the project quickly became one of the University’s most successful student volunteer initiatives. The project aim is to strengthen links between young adults and older people, and to promote understanding, recognising that positive intergenerational relationships are key to a healthy community. Through a shared love of stories and poems, the conversations they spark and the human emotions they speak of and into, common ground is found.

Evaluation of the Rotherham Carers Resilience Service: final report

DAYSON Chris, BENNETT Ellen
2016

An independent evaluation of the Rotherham Carers Resilience Service, which is delivered in partnership by Crossroads Care Rotherham, Rotherham and Doncaster Alzheimer's Society and Age UK Rotherham on behalf of NHS Rotherham Clinical Commissioning Group. The service provides information, advice and practical support to help carers of people living with dementia to care for the person with dementia at home for as long as possible. The evaluation looked at the impact of the service on carer health and well-being, the effect on patient and carer use of NHS care and resources, and views on the effectiveness of the service. It included interviews with stakeholders including five service staff, one GP, and one representative of the CCG; and questionnaires and interviews with carers using the service; and three in-depth client case studies. The evaluation reports that the service reached more than 330 carers during its first year, from February 2015 to March 2016. Successes of the service included linking carers in to other services from the statutory, voluntary and community sector; providing carers information about benefits entitlements; and access to home based support services. The service was highly valued by beneficiaries and there was evidence for improvement in key outcome measures. These included small numbers of carers reporting better general well-being, better health and improvements in their carer quality of life. There was insufficient evidence to confirm whether the service had reduced the demand for emergency care.

Policy briefing: music, singing and wellbeing in adults with diagnosed conditions or dementia

WHAT WORKS WELLBEING
2016

Drawing on the available evidence, this briefing examines what music and singing interventions work to improve wellbeing of adults living with diagnosed conditions or dementia. While there is ample evidence looking at the impact of music and singing on clinical outcomes such as pain management, coping with hospitalisation, coping with symptoms and managing symptoms of dementia, this new evidence focuses on wellbeing for those living with diagnosed conditions or dementia. Specifically, it focuses on self-reported measures of quality of life; life satisfaction; and anxiety or depression. The paper suggests that there is strong evidence that brief music therapy is an effective intervention to support wellbeing of palliative care patients in hospital settings and initial evidence that music therapy can contribute to improved spiritual wellbeing in hospice patients. There is strong evidence targeted, culturally relevant music interventions can decrease depression in nursing students in a college environment and initial evidence that music therapy can alleviate anxiety in undergraduate students. There is promising evidence that targeted, culturally relevant music and singing interventions can enhance mental wellbeing and decrease depression in older people with chronic conditions in residential and community settings and initial evidence that participation in individual personalised music listening sessions can reduce anxiety and/or depression in nursing home residents with dementia and that listening to music may enhance overall wellbeing for adults with dementia. There is initial evidence that participation in extended community singing programmes can improve quality of life and social and emotional wellbeing in adults living with chronic conditions.

Systematic review: music, singing and wellbeing for adults living with dementia

VICTOR Christina, et al
2016

A systematic review of the subjective, self-reported wellbeing outcomes of music and singing in adults living with dementia. The review encompasses data from 249 participants in quantitative and qualitative studies from Australia, Canada, Finland, France, and the United Kingdom. It encompasses interventions focusing upon singing or listening to music. Three key domains of wellbeing are reported: quality of life, depression and anxiety. Studies and findings where the methodology entails observation by a researcher or clinician of the effects of music and singing on the wellbeing of people with dementia were excluded. In addition, the review excluded studies where the outcome was defined in terms of dementia or clinical symptoms or where the focus was on outcomes for carers. Given these caveats the key findings are that for people with dementia music and signing are important aspects of subjective wellbeing that can promote domains of subjective wellbeing, social connections and maintenance of identity. Active participation seemed to be less beneficial than listening to music but this is only a very tentative finding which needs support by further research. On the current evidence base, the review supports the development of policy and practice of support for music and singing interventions for wellbeing outcomes for people with dementia but suggests that interventions should reflect both active and passive forms of engagement.

Review of the grey literature: music, singing and wellbeing

DAYKIN Norma, et al
2016

This report reviews evidence from the grey literature on wellbeing outcomes for music and singing for adults. The evidence was received through a call for evidence placed on the What Works Wellbeing website in 2016. A total of 51 reports were received, of which 32 met the inclusion criteria. These included: 12 reports on music and singing interventions with healthy adults; 12 reports on participants with a range of diagnosed conditions including COPD, Parkinson’s, stroke and mental health conditions; and eight reports on participants living with dementia. An additional five unpublished PhDs were also identified. The report summarises the evaluation methods used in the projects; quantitative and qualitative wellbeing outcomes identified; and process evaluations carried out. The review found evidence of improved mental wellbeing in evaluations of two singing interventions for people in the community experiencing, or at risk of, mental health problems. Two studies of music interventions for older participants in hospital also reported improvements in observed wellbeing. Qualitative findings also suggest that participants involved in singing and music projects report positive outcomes such as improved mood, purpose and social interaction. Adults with dementia also experienced increased engagement, relaxation, and better connection with others. Key issues reported from process evaluations included: barriers to activity, such as lack of accessible transport; institutional barriers, particularly in care home settings where projects rely on the support of care staff and managers. Limitations of the evidence are also briefly discussed.

Evaluation of Music in Mind: findings to date

NEW ECONOMY
2014

This report details the interim findings of the evaluation of the third phase of the Music in Mind (MiM) project. MiM is a music therapy group run by Manchester Camerata that offers free music therapy sessions for people with dementia (PWD) and their carers. The sessions aim to improve the quality of life and wellbeing of the attendees through music making. The report provides a brief introduction to the MiM project and summarises the findings of a literature review. It then presents the participants’ views of the MiM, as recorded in their diaries or communicated through interviews, and discusses key findings. The key themes that emerge from the evaluation are linked to the mood of the service users: feeling calmer, happier, energised and/or relaxed. Improvements were also noted in PWD’s memory and recollection, confidence levels and relationships with carers. However the extent of other benefits appears to vary greatly depending on the type of dementia the service users’ are living with and the severity of their symptoms. The findings of this evaluation seem to be in line with the literature, suggesting that MIM appears to promote general wellbeing amongst participants and have a positive impact on relationships.

Delivering a healthier future: how CCGs are leading the way on prevention and early diagnosis

NHS CLINICAL COMMISSIONERS
2016

Focusing on prevention and early diagnosis, the case studies in this publication demonstrate the impact clinical commissioning groups are making in a wide range of areas including mental health care, early diagnosis of cancer and stroke prevention. They show how CCGs are taking the lead in preventing illness and the causes of ill health – and working to keep people out of hospital where possible; how they are helping to ensure that people are diagnosed earlier and given the support that they need; and they are working across boundaries to build on what people want and need to help them lead longer, healthier lives. More specifically the case studies provide examples of: working proactively with older people living with frailty; addressing preventable early deaths; supporting people to prevent and manage diabetes; reducing hospital admissions in people with COPD; managing c. difficile infections in the community; improving access to health services for homeless people; taking a strategic approach to stroke prevention; addressing early diagnosis of cancer; earlier diagnosis and prevention of HIV; improving early diagnosis and treatment of people with atrial fibrillation; working with the voluntary sector; impact of Living Well; and social prescribing to improve outcomes.

Results 1 - 10 of 33

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