Coronavirus guidance for social care and social work

#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#

Find prevention records by subject or service provider/commissioner name

  • Key to icons

    • Journal Prevention service example
    • Book Book
    • Digital media Digital media
    • Journal Journal article
    • Free resource Free resource

Results for 'dementia'

Results 1 - 10 of 86

All those who wander are not lost: walking with purpose in extra care, retirement and domestic housing

BARRETT Julie, EVANS Simon, PRITCHARD-WILKES Vanessa
2020

Sets out the findings from a mixed methods study exploring walking with purpose in extra care, retirement and domestic housing settings, along with the perceptions and responses of staff and family carers. The term ‘wandering’ has become a label with negative overtones in the context of dementia care and suggests aimlessness, whereas in fact there is often a purpose or aim behind this activity. In recognition of this, the term ‘walking with purpose’ is used in this study while also acknowledging that this includes ‘wandering’ as a normal and valuable human activity. The study indicates that, although residents who walk with purpose constitute a minority of people living in retirement and extra care housing schemes, managing walking with purpose can be a challenge for management and staff and can occupy a disproportionate amount of their time. The findings emphasise the importance of: getting to know the resident, finding out their motivations and reasons for walking and trying to accommodate their wishes; ensuring staff receive appropriate training in understanding and addressing walking with purpose; ensuring the design of the physical environment supports the way-finding abilities of people living with dementia. Example design recommendations that emerged from this study include: gardens and outdoor spaces must be secure and enclosed; provide safe indoor and outdoor walking routes with frequent places to rest and interesting things to see and do along the way; design features to assist with way-finding. The paper also supports the use of assistive technology devices such as contact ID wrist bands, door sensors, speaking door sensors, GPS trackers and alarm mats.

Reducing falls among people living with dementia: a systematic review

PEEK Kerry, et al
2020

People diagnosed with dementia are at greater risk of falls. Given the increasing incidence of dementia globally, high quality and methodologically rigorous research is needed to inform evidence-based practice initiatives. Aims: To describe the published literature related to describing, reducing or preventing fall incidences for people living with dementia including: (1) trends in the total number of intervention and non-intervention studies between 1997 and 2016; (2) the methodological quality of identified intervention studies; and (3) the effectiveness of interventions designed to reduce the incidence of falls among people living with dementia.Methods: A systematic review of five databases was conducted to identify studies reporting any aspect of falls incidence for people with a diagnosis of dementia. Studies meeting the eligibility criteria were coded as intervention or non-intervention studies. Intervention studies were assessed using Cochrane’s Effective Practice and Organisation of Care tool. Data about the effectiveness of interventions meeting Effective Practice and Organisation of Care criteria were extracted. Results: Seventy-two eligible studies were identified; 57 were non-intervention studies, and 15 were intervention studies. The number of published studies increased between 1997 and 2016, peaking in 2013 (n = 10). Of the 15 intervention studies, seven studies met Effective Practice and Organisation of Care design criteria with one study rated low risk on all eight Effective Practice and Organisation of Care risk of bias domains. One high-risk exercise-based intervention study demonstrated a significant reduction in falls among people living with dementia. Conclusions: There is currently insufficient evidence to endorse any intervention to reduce falls for people living with dementia in any setting. More high-quality intervention studies are needed. Keywords

Efficacy and generalizability of falls prevention interventions in nursing homes: a systematic review and meta-analysis

GULKA Heidi J, et al
2020

Objectives: To determine the efficacy of fall intervention programs in nursing homes (NHs) and the generalizability of these interventions to people living with cognitive impairment and dementia. Design: Systematic review and meta-analysis. Setting and Participants: NH residents (n = 30,057) living in NHs defined as residential facilities that provide 24-hours-a-day surveillance, personal care, and some clinical care for persons who are typically aged ≥65 years with multiple complex chronic health conditions. Methods: Meta-analysis of falls prevention interventions on number of falls, fallers, and recurrent fallers. Results: Thirty-six studies met inclusion criteria for the systematic review. Overall, fall prevention interventions reduced the number of falls [risk ratio (RR) = 0.73, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.60-0.88], fallers (RR = 0.80, 95% CI = 0.72-0.89), and recurrent fallers (RR = 0.70, 95% CI = 0.60-0.81). Subanalyses revealed that single interventions have a significant effect on reducing fallers (RR = 0.78, 95% CI = 0.69-0.89) and recurrent fallers (RR = 0.60, 95% CI = 0.52-0.70), whereas multiple interventions reduce fallers (RR = 0.69, 95% CI = 0.39-0.97) and multifactorial interventions reduce number of falls (RR = 0.65, 95% CI = 0.45-0.94). Conclusions and Implications: Exercise as a single intervention reduced the number of fallers and recurrent fallers by 36% and 41%, respectively, in people living in NHs. Other effective interventions included staff education and multiple and multifactorial interventions. However, more research on exercise including people with cognitive impairment and dementia is needed to improve the generalizability of these interventions to the typical NH resident.

Hear and now: the impact of an intergenerational arts and health project on participant wellbeing

JENKINS Lindsay, FARRER Rachel, AUJLA Imogen
2020

This research explores the impact that an intergenerational arts and health project can have upon wellbeing, with a particular focus on the benefits that intergenerational practice can provide in relation to quality of life, affect, and social inclusion. It is based on Hear and Now, an award-winning, intergenerational community arts project developed by the Philharmonia Orchestra and Orchestras Live in Bedford, which brought together older adults living with dementia and young people. The study looked at the impact on the participant end users, and also the experiences of their carers and the artists and support staff who facilitated the project. Data were collected through observations of the workshops and focus groups. Researchers used the PERMA model of wellbeing to reflect on the impact of the project. The results found that participants reported: many positive emotions; a high level of engagement; the creation of positive relationships and new connections; that the project had meaning and that they felt of value; and an overall sense of achievement and accomplishment. The findings highlight the holistic impact of intergenerational arts and its ability to create a sense of belonging and purpose that unites different sectors of the community. The report also highlights key learning for future projects.

Engaging with the arts to improve health and wellbeing in social care settings

WELSH NHS CONFEDERATION
2020

This briefing, prepared for the Cross-Party Group on Arts and Health, provides innovative examples of arts-based activities which are being delivered in social care settings across Wales to improve people’s physical and mental wellbeing. They include Live Music Now which supports professional musicians to deliver evidence-based music workshops in care homes; cARTrefu, a project from Age Cymru to improve access to quality arts experiences for older people in residential care homes project; and Bangor University's Dementia and Imagination.

Nostalgia as a psychological resource for people with dementia: a systematic review and meta-analysis of evidence of effectiveness from experimental studies

ISMAIL Sanda Umar, et al
2020

Objective: This review systematically examines evidence relating to the effect of nostalgia on psychological well-being through a meta-analysis of measures of social connectedness, self-esteem, meaning in life, self-continuity, optimism and positive and negative affect. Rationale: If nostalgia is to be used as a clinical intervention to boost well-being in dementia by reducing threat, then it is important to assess its therapeutic potential. Results: Searches carried out in July 2014 and updated in February 2018 identified 47 eligible experimental studies comparing nostalgic reminiscence and non-nostalgic reminiscence to be included in the meta-analysis. Nostalgic reminiscence had moderate effects on positive affect (0.51 (0.37, 0.65), p= 0.001), social connectedness (0.72 (0.57, 0.87), p= 0.001), self-esteem (0.50 (0.30, 0.70), p= 0.001), meaning in life (0.77 (0.47, 1.08), p= 0.001) and optimism (0.38 (0.28, 0.47), p= 0.001) and a large effect on self-continuity (0.81 (0.55, 1.07), p= 0.001). There was, however, no difference between the effect of nostalgic reminiscence and non-nostalgic reminiscence for negative affect (−0.06 (−0.20, 0.09), p= 0.443). Conclusion: This systematic review and meta-analysis provides an overview of the evidence base for nostalgia. This is an important stage in developing nostalgia as a clinical intervention for people with dementia which might be achieved, for instance, by adapting current reminiscence and life review techniques. This meta-analysis will therefore also serve as a valuable reference point for the continued exploration of nostalgia as an intervention.

Living well with dementia through music: a resource book for activities providers and care staff


2020

A guide to music activities for people with dementia for use by activity leaders, care staff and therapists, drawing on the expertise of people regularly using music in their work. The ideas show the varied ways that music can enhance the daily lives from the early to late stage of dementia. It includes chapters on the creative uses of technology, such as tablets and personal playlists. It also covers general considerations for using music with people living with dementia in institutional settings, including evaluating and recording outcomes.

The effect of music on wellbeing - case studies

CONROY Jill, FAULKNER Sue
2020

This article reports on a small scale study of the impact of personalised music on residents living with dementia in a care home. Three care homes (Fremantle Trust's Lent Rise House, Lewin House and Meadowside care homes) and nine people living with dementia took part in the two week study. Care staff and activity organisers selected times of day (and night) to play music or a radio station with the resident. The researchers collaborated with Unforgettable (now part of Live Better with Dementia), a company allied to the non-profit organisation Music and Memory which donates iPods to people living in care homes to deliver the intervention. Findings:Qualitative statements from the care homes were invariably positive. Personalised music was found to reduce agitation and improve mood. None of the people living with dementia were able to initiate music themselves, so it required either staff or visitors to play it. Conclusion: the findings suggest that, when compiled in a person-centred way, music can be a source of comfort and calm. It can counter distressing events, alleviate anxiety, and increase sociability. The paper also includes some implications for practice or tips on how to provide personalised music in care homes.

Day centres for older people: a systematically conducted scoping review of literature about their benefits, purposes and how they are perceived

ORELLANA Katharine, MANTHORPE Jill, TINKER Anthea
2020

With a policy shift towards personalisation of adult social care in England, much attention has focused on individualised support for older people with care needs. This article reports the findings of a scoping review of United Kingdom (UK) and non-UK literature, published in English from 2005 to 2017, about day centres for older people without dementia and highlights the gaps in evidence. This review, undertaken to inform new empirical research, covered the perceptions, benefits and purposes of day centres. Searches, undertaken in October/November 2014 and updated in August 2017, of electronic databases, libraries, websites, research repositories and journals, identified 77 relevant papers, mostly non-UK. Day centres were found to play a variety of roles for individuals and in care systems. The largest body of evidence concerned social and preventive outcomes. Centre attendance and participation in interventions within them impacted positively on older people's mental health, social contacts, physical function and quality of life. Evidence about outcomes is mainly non-UK. Day centres for older people without dementia are under-researched generally, particularly in the UK. In addition to not being studied as whole services, there are considerable evidence gaps about how day centres are perceived, their outcomes, what they offer, to whom and their wider stakeholders, including family carers, volunteers, staff and professionals who are funding, recommending or referring older people to them.

Animal-assisted therapy for dementia (Review)

LAI NM, et al
2019

Background: A range of new therapeutic strategies has been evaluated in research, and the use of trained animals in therapy sessions, termed animal‐assisted therapy (AAT), is receiving increasing attention. Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of animal‐assisted therapy for people with dementia. Search methods: Medical databases were searched for this review to September 2019. Key characteristics of included studies: This study included nine randomised controlled trials (clinical studies where people are randomly put into one of two or more treatment groups), involving 305 people with dementia, which compared AAT to a control treatment (either usual care or an alternative treatment). All studies took place in Europe or the US. Seven studies compared AAT to usual care or to another activity which had nothing to do with animals. Two studies compared AAT (using live animals) to the use of robotic animals. One study compared AAT to the use of a soft toy cat. Key findings: this study found evidence from two studies with 83 participants that people with dementia who had AAT were possibly slightly less depressed at the end of treatment than people who had standard care or other interventions not related to animals. The study also found evidence from three studies with 164 participants that people who received AAT had no clear difference in their quality of life compared to those who did not. However, the study found no evidence of an effect on social functioning (interactions with their environment and families), behaviour, agitation, activities of daily living, self‐care ability or balance. There were no clear differences when AAT was compared with the use of a robotic animal in two studies, or with the use of a soft toy cat in one study. Conclusions: AAT may slightly reduce depressive symptoms. Otherwise, no conclusions can yet be drawn on whether AAT is beneficial or safe for people with dementia. The small size of the included studies, and the diversity of outcomes and outcome measures, were major issues. The researchers recommend further well‐conducted studies with the inclusion of important outcomes such as emotional and social well‐being, quality of life, side effects, and effects on the animals.

Results 1 - 10 of 86

#EXCLUDE#
News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
View more: News
Related SCIE content
Related external content
Visit Social Care Online, the UK’s largest database of information and research on all aspects of social care and social work.
SEARCH NOW
Submit prevention service example
SUBMIT
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#