#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#

Find prevention records by subject or service provider/commissioner name

  • Key to icons

    • Journal Prevention service example
    • Book Book
    • Digital media Digital media
    • Journal Journal article
    • Free resource Free resource

Results for 'dementia'

Results 11 - 20 of 33

Cartwheel Arts- Art for Wellbeing

NHS Heywood, Middleton and Rochdale Clinical Commissioning Group

Cartwheel Art's 'Art for Wellbeing' is a three-year programme in Rochdale and Wigan that delivers courses, workshops and projects to improve mental health. Cartwheel’s mental health projects are run by professional artists, and work towards a tangible final outcome—an exhibition or publication. Each course has a dedicated Emotional Support Worker with a therapeutic background who works alongside the artist.

Peer support for people with dementia resource pack: promoting peer support opportunities for people with dementia

HEALTH INNOVATION NETWORK SOUTH LONDON
2015

Bringing together examples of good practice and evidence-based guidance, the pack aims to help groups and organisations better support people with dementia in their communities. The pack was developed in partnership with leading dementia and older people charities, with contributions from Innovations in Dementia, The Alzheimer’s Society, AGE UK and Mental Health Foundation. The Health Innovation Network dementia team worked with people with dementia across south London to provide case studies and contribute to the films within the pack. The guide includes: information about what peer support is and how different types of groups can support people with dementia; why peer support can help people with dementia stay connected with their communities; guidance and resources to help people who want to run groups for or including people with dementia; and some ideas for how to tell if the group is doing well.

Putting older people first: our vision for the next five years. A whole system approach to meeting housing, health and wellbeing outcomes for our older populations in South West England

OXFORD BROOKES UNIVERSITY. Institute of Public Care
2015

This document by the South West Housing LIN leadership sets out a vision for a whole system approach to meeting housing, health and wellbeing outcomes for the older population in South West England over the next 5 years. It highlights: the aims and objectives of the group; specific issues facing the sector in the region; and examples of innovative practice and the group’s priorities over the next 5 years. These include: supporting initiatives which contribute to more integrated approaches to service design and delivery; promoting the development of new models of care based in and around the housing services, taking the opportunities these present to develop community based, local services and highlight the benefits of taking co-productive and inclusive approaches to service design; building an evidence base which shows how housing and housing related services contribute to the wider health and social care agenda, through prevention, as well as supporting the management of long term conditions; raising awareness around dementia, including how housing organisations can enable people living with dementia, and their carers, to live independently within the community; and raising awareness about the potential that technologies offer in supporting older people to live independently, and seeking to address the barriers to wider adoption.

From evidence into action: opportunities to protect and improve the nation's health

PUBLIC HEALTH ENGLAND
2014

Strategic document setting out Public Health England's priorities for the next five years. The report provides a brief overview of the state of health in England today, the key health drivers, prevention plans, and future trends. It identifies and examines seven priorities for PHE working with local and central government, clinical commissioning groups and the wider NHS, universities, industry, employers, and the voluntary and community sector. These are: tackling obesity; reducing smoking; reducing harmful drinking; ensuring every child has the best start in life; reducing dementia risk; tackling antimicrobial resistance; and reducing tuberculosis.

Peer support for people with dementia: a social return on investment (SROI) study

SEMPLE Amy, WILLIS Elizabeth, de WAAL Hugo
2015

Reports on a study using Social Return on Investment (SROI) analysis to examine the impact and social value of peer support groups as an intervention for people with dementia. Three peer support groups in South London participated in the study. A separate SROI analysis was carried out for each individual group to find out what people valued about the groups and how they helped them. The report presents the outcomes for each group, the indicators for evidencing these outcomes and the quality and duration of outcomes experienced. It then provides detail on the methodology used to calculate the impact and the social return on investment. Overall, the study found that peer support groups provide positive outcomes for people with dementia, their carers and the volunteers who support the groups. The benefits of participating in peer support groups included: reduced isolation and loneliness; increased stimulation, including mental stimulation; and increased wellbeing. Carers experienced a reduction in carer stress, carer burden and reduction in the feeling of loneliness. Volunteers had an increased sense of wellbeing through their engagement with the group, improved knowledge of dementia and gained transferrable skills. Overall the study found that for every pound (£) of investment the social value created by the three groups evaluated ranged from £1.17 to £5.18.

The value of peer support on cognitive improvement amongst older people living with dementia

CHAKKALACKAL Lauren
2014

Peer support can play a critical role in improving the wellbeing, social support and practical coping strategies of older people living with dementia. This paper describes selected findings from the Mental Health Foundation’s evaluation of three peer support groups for people living with dementia in extra-care housing schemes. It highlights the groups as a promising approach for maintaining cognitive faculties, reducing social isolation, increasing social networks and improving overall wellbeing. A mixed-method study design examined the impact of the groups on participants’ wellbeing, managing memory, independent living skills and social support. Participants reported positive impact from taking part in the support groups for wellbeing, social support and practical coping strategies. Participants also reported positive benefits of the groups on communication abilities, managing memory and managing their lives. Peer support groups in extra-care housing schemes address the psychological, social and emotional needs of people with dementia. This evaluation adds to the literature on the effectiveness of these interventions for those with cognitive impairment.

Beyond fighting fires: the role of the fire and rescue service in improving the public's health

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2015

The case studies contained within this publication explore the activities of fire and rescue service to help the most vulnerable individuals and families in their communities. The trust placed in these services and the comprehensive access to the public that this provides means they have a unique ability to provide critical interventions, promote health messages and refer to appropriate services. These case studies include programmes spread across England, covering both rural and urban environments and with varying levels of deprivation and affluence. They show a range of ways in which the fire and rescue service supports prevention and contributes to tackling health inequalities by: supporting people with dementia; using firefighters to be ‘health champions’; tackling child obesity; reaching out to the most vulnerable; looking out for babies and toddlers; getting people active; working with others to save lives; and reducing falls in the home.

Ageing in the UK: trends and foresight: report 7

FLATTERS Paul, JOHNSON Tom, O'SHEA Ruairi
2015

Presents key information and data on the UK ageing population, including an analysis of current trends and the implications for the future. The report sets out the national picture, focusing on the demographic context, the state of income, pensions and retirement arrangements, and health issues. In addition, the report considers a range of aspects associated with old age, including: loneliness, dementia, older carers, volunteering, and digital inclusion. The report indicates that the population of the UK is set to increase significantly over the next decade, with much of this growth driven by an ageing population and sustained increases in the number of people over 65 years old. While the number of older people living in relative or absolute poverty has not increased since the start of the economic downturn, the minimum income standard for pensioners has risen and many of those on low incomes have trouble meeting everyday expenditure. The report suggests that higher dependency ratios will place huge demand on already strained public services, requiring greater support from the charitable sector. The impact of dementia will be a significant area of need in the future: even if incidence rates remain stable, the growth in the population of people over the age of 65 will see the number affected more than double from c.800,000 in 2012 to 2.2m in 2051. However, the report concludes that it is likely that incidence rates for dementia will increase as longevity continues to increase and diagnosis improves.

Dementia friendly communities: guidance for councils

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION, INNOVATIONS IN DEMENTIA
2015

This guidance looks at current best practice and learning in the creation of dementia friendly communities, how it fits within the broader policy landscape, and what actions councils can take, and are already taking in supporting people with dementia by creating local dementia friendly communities. It illustrates how simple changes to existing services, and awareness raising for those who come into day-to-day contact with people with dementia such as staff working in libraries or in leisure centres, can help people with dementia feel more confident and welcome in using council services. The guide looks at what a dementia friendly community is, why dementia is a key issue for councils and the role councils can play. It then presents a framework to help develop to plan, develop and assess the dementia friendliness of any community, organisation or process. The framework covers five domains: the voices of people with dementia and their supporters, the place, the people, resources, and networks. For each domain information is included on: the background to the issue, key actions that councils can take to make this happen, and examples or case studies of existing practice. The guide for those who have a role in leading, planning, commissioning and delivering public services; including health and wellbeing boards, and those responsible for health and social care services.

Co-producing approaches to the management of dementia through social prescribing

BAKER Keith, IRVING Adele
2016

A promising approach to the management of dementia is ‘social prescribing’. Social prescribing is a form of ‘co-production’ that involves linking patients with non-clinical activities, typically delivered by voluntary and community groups, in an effort to improve their sense of well-being. The success of social prescribing depends upon the ability of boundary-spanning individuals within service delivery organizations to develop referral pathways and collaborative relationships through ‘networks’. This article examines the operation of a pilot social prescribing programme in the North East of England, targeted at older people with early onset dementia and depression, at risk of social isolation. It is argued that the scheme was not sustained, in part, because the institutional logics that governed the actions of key boundary-spanning individuals militated against the collaboration necessary to support co-production.

Results 11 - 20 of 33

#EXCLUDE#
Ask about support on integration, STPs and transformation
ENQUIRE
Related SCIE content
Related NICE content
Related external content
Visit Social Care Online, the UK’s largest database of information and research on all aspects of social care and social work.
SEARCH NOW
Submit prevention service example
SUBMIT
What do you think about SCIE's work?
FEEDBACK
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#