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Results for 'dementia'

Results 21 - 30 of 33

Sustainability, innovation and empowerment: a five year vision for the independent social care sector

CARE ENGLAND
2015

Sets out Care England’s vision for the next five years on how the organisation and the sector plan to deal with a number of issues facing the health and social care system. The report focuses on critical areas of the current social care landscape, including: integrated and person-centred care; falling fees and local authorities’ budgetary constraints; recruitment of nurses; recruitment, pay and training of the care workforce; raising awareness of the value of the sector; the Care Quality Commission and the need for further improvement of the regulation process; learning disabilities; and dementia. The report warns of the risk of a collapse in the system if providers and commissioners do not work together and more nurses are not recruited into the independent sector.

Living a normal life: supporting the development of dementia friendly communities

HENWOOD Melanie
2015

An evaluation of a Skills for Care funded a programme of 12 pilot projects, across 11 organisations, for 12 months in 2013/14 designed to support the development of dementia friendly communities (DFCs), by improving community understanding and awareness of dementia and supporting people living with dementia and their carers to participate in their communities. Section 1 of the report provides an introduction both to the underlying objectives of the programme, and to the participating pilot sites. Section 2 presents an overview of the cross-cutting themes and issues identified across the sites, including motivation and engagement, working with the wider community, intergenerational aspects, engaging with GPs and the NHS, and impact and outcomes. The methodology for the evaluation included analysis of written reports; and one to one semi-structured interviews with project leads. The report highlights the importance of motivation and personal engagement as driving forces while suggesting that most projects encountered difficulties – to a greater or lesser extent – in trying to work with the wider community in developing awareness and understanding of dementia. A few of the projects were addressing intergenerational dimensions of dementia awareness and were working with schools, or were planning to develop such work. In working with a range of local partners many projects were deliberately engaging with the NHS in general and with GPs in particular to increase diagnosis rates. The report concludes that equipping people with the skills and understanding to respond to the needs of people with dementia has great potential to bring about transformational change and to enable genuine social inclusion.

Research programme 2013-14: helping smaller housing associations become dementia friendly: their experience and the impacts on their policy and practice

RISEBOROUGH Moyra, JONES Adrian
2014

This report presents the main findings from a collaborative evaluation over a year with four small housing associations who decided in 2013 to work towards becoming dementia friendly organisations. The report illustrates the changes the associations made and gives their reasons for making those changes. It describes detailed experiences of the small housing associations, reflecting on their starting points and examining the methods they used to establish dementia friendly housing organisations. The report looks at the reasons why leaders and key staff decided to invest time and energy into becoming dementia friendly housing organisations. It also looks at the reasons why training was so important and at how the organisations started to change their practices, processes and policies. Drawing on a variety of measures to compare and contrast the work of the associations against, the report concludes with an overall evaluation, showing that through a mix of pragmatism and planning the housing associations were able to make deep changes.

Dementia Friendship Scheme

Age UK Coventry

Age UK Coventry runs a Dementia Friendship Scheme for older people with early stage dementia, which aims to support people who live alone to maintain a hobby, or activity within their local community.

Going outside is essential for health and well-being

POLLOCK Annie
2012

There is strong evidence that people with dementia in care homes and hospital wards do not go outside and that, if there is outdoor space, it is not usually dementia friendly. This article reviews the evidence which shows that being outside is essential for mental and physical health and well-being. Vitamin D deficiency is due mainly to a lack of exposure to sunshine, and has been shown to be associated with falls and with a low mood and cognitive impairment. Physical exercise is also important for health and can reduce the risk of falls. Going outside and keeping active have been shown to: improve general health; reduce risk of depression; reduce cognitive decline; provide older people with a sense of freedom; improve sleeping patterns; improve appetite; reduce incontinence; and reduce aggressive behaviour. The article argues that the benefits of being outside, of being exposed to light, and taking part in exercise can lead to a reduction in the use of drugs. Savings in the cost of care can be used in the creation of therapeutic outdoor spaces. A second article will cover the key design features that can enable the use of outside space.

Maximising the potential for the use of assistive technology: an information toolkit to support people with dementia, their carers and dementia services

ASSOCIATION OF DIRECTORS OF ADULT SOCIAL SERVICES, IMPROVEMENT AND EFFICIENCY WEST MIDLANDS, COMMUNITY GATEWAY CIC
2013

Assistive Technology is “any product or service designed to enable independence for disabled and older people, and their carers”, or “any device or system that allows individuals to perform tasks that they would otherwise be unable to do, or increases the ease and safety with which tasks can be performed”. This guide brings together references and guides, many of which support more accurate assessment of need and which explain how assistive technology can support either people with dementia or their families or indeed carers. An emphasis is placed on case studies as examples of the application of technology solutions designed around the person, so the examples are highly personalised and tailored to individual needs.

Assistive technology as a means of supporting people with dementia: a review

BONNER Steve, IDRIS Tahir
2012

Awareness of Assistive Technology (AT) products, devices and solutions available is still sketchy and variable around the UK. There is almost a ‘postcode lottery’ relating to the quality of AT solutions available to people with dementia due to the varying approaches taken around the country. This paper reviews the current policy and practice in relation to AT supporting people to live well with dementia, including different housing settings and rounding off with some good practice case studies which highlight the wide array of technology solutions available. Included in this review are: a brief summary of different types of AT; a review of policy initiatives, including legislation, which have attempted to encourage the greater use of AT; ethical considerations; current practice by major housing providers; good practice examples; and people with dementia’s experience.

Building dementia-friendly communities: a priority for everyone

GREEN Geraldine, LAKEY Louise, ALZHEIMER'S SOCIETY
2013

The National Dementia Declaration for England (2010) identified that people with dementia want to live in communities that give them choice and control over their lives, provide services and support designed around their needs, and to feel valued and understood, and part of family, community and civic life. This report provides evidence of dementia-friendly communities in England, Wales and Northern Ireland from the perspective of people affected by dementia. It uses the results of a survey of people with dementia (510 respondents) distributed by Alzheimer’s Society staff and other networks in Autumn 2012 (referred to as the DFCsurvey) to explore the barriers that people face in their community, how they would like to be engaged in their local area, and the support they need to enable them to do so. Overall, the report aims to provide guidance to areas that are looking to become dementia-friendly, and to provide extra evidence for those already committed to becoming dementia-friendly. Evidence from people with dementia and their carers is collated alongside examples of projects that are making a difference for people with dementia. This information is used both to provide a definition of a dementia-friendly community, and to suggest 10 key areas of focus for communities to consider in working to become dementia friendly. These 10 key areas are: challenge stigma and build understanding; accessible community activities; acknowledge potential; ensure an early diagnosis; practical support to enable engagement in community life; community-based solutions; consistent and reliable travel options; easy to navigate environments; and respectful and responsive businesses and services. While there are some excellent examples of communities that are adapting themselves to the needs required by dementia, many people with dementia do not feel supported and a part of their local area; and are not able to take part in activities that they enjoyed before they developed the condition. Loneliness, feeling isolated and lack of confidence were identified as major barriers.

Funny things happen at the Grange: introducing comedy activities in day services to older people with dementia: innovative practice

HAFFORD-LETCHFIELD Trish
2013

This paper shares outcomes from the evaluation of a community project where comedy activities were introduced into a day centre for older people with dementia as a result of a partnership between the day centre, a local university and a specialist comedy provider. Four workshops were provided using improvisatory activities and comedy, as a medium to engage older people in reflecting on aspects of their care environment. The main output resulted in a 30 minute ‘mockumentary’ of the ‘Her Majesty the Queen’ visiting the day centre, in the form of a digital reusable learning object to be used by social work and mental health professionals. The evaluation demonstrated some additional outcomes for those involved and highlighted the benefits of laughter and fun in promoting a positive climate.

Does physical activity reduce burden in carers of people with dementia? A literature review

ORGETA Vasiliki, MIRANDA-CASTILLO Claudia
2014

Objective: Physical exercise has been associated with a range of positive outcomes including improvements in psychological well-being. The aim of the present study was to review current evidence on the effects of physical activity interventions for carers of people with dementia. Methods: A systematic review using electronic databases and key articles of studies that evaluated the effectiveness of physical activity interventions in improving psychological well-being in carers of people with dementia. Relevant papers were scored according to established criteria set by the Cochrane Review Group. Selection criteria for studies were a randomized controlled trial (RCT) design, and comparing physical activity with a control group receiving no specific physical activity intervention. Two reviewers worked independently to select trials, extract data, and assess risk of bias. Results: A total of four RCTs met the inclusion criteria. Studies evaluated home-based supervised physical activity of low to moderate intensity, which included either aerobic exercise, or endurance training. Pooled data showed that physical activity reduced subjective caregiver burden in carers. Conclusions: There is evidence from two RCTs that physical activity reduces subjective caregiver burden for carers of people with dementia. Although statistically significant, the observed benefits should be interpreted with caution as the studies conducted so far have limitations. Further high-quality trials are needed for evaluating the effectiveness of physical activity in improving psychological well-being in carers of people with dementia

Results 21 - 30 of 33

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