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Results for 'dementia'

Results 31 - 40 of 56

Review of the grey literature: music, singing and wellbeing

DAYKIN Norma, et al
2016

This report reviews evidence from the grey literature on wellbeing outcomes for music and singing for adults. The evidence was received through a call for evidence placed on the What Works Wellbeing website in 2016. A total of 51 reports were received, of which 32 met the inclusion criteria. These included: 12 reports on music and singing interventions with healthy adults; 12 reports on participants with a range of diagnosed conditions including COPD, Parkinson’s, stroke and mental health conditions; and eight reports on participants living with dementia. An additional five unpublished PhDs were also identified. The report summarises the evaluation methods used in the projects; quantitative and qualitative wellbeing outcomes identified; and process evaluations carried out. The review found evidence of improved mental wellbeing in evaluations of two singing interventions for people in the community experiencing, or at risk of, mental health problems. Two studies of music interventions for older participants in hospital also reported improvements in observed wellbeing. Qualitative findings also suggest that participants involved in singing and music projects report positive outcomes such as improved mood, purpose and social interaction. Adults with dementia also experienced increased engagement, relaxation, and better connection with others. Key issues reported from process evaluations included: barriers to activity, such as lack of accessible transport; institutional barriers, particularly in care home settings where projects rely on the support of care staff and managers. Limitations of the evidence are also briefly discussed.

Evaluation of Music in Mind: findings to date

NEW ECONOMY
2014

This report details the interim findings of the evaluation of the third phase of the Music in Mind (MiM) project. MiM is a music therapy group run by Manchester Camerata that offers free music therapy sessions for people with dementia (PWD) and their carers. The sessions aim to improve the quality of life and wellbeing of the attendees through music making. The report provides a brief introduction to the MiM project and summarises the findings of a literature review. It then presents the participants’ views of the MiM, as recorded in their diaries or communicated through interviews, and discusses key findings. The key themes that emerge from the evaluation are linked to the mood of the service users: feeling calmer, happier, energised and/or relaxed. Improvements were also noted in PWD’s memory and recollection, confidence levels and relationships with carers. However the extent of other benefits appears to vary greatly depending on the type of dementia the service users’ are living with and the severity of their symptoms. The findings of this evaluation seem to be in line with the literature, suggesting that MIM appears to promote general wellbeing amongst participants and have a positive impact on relationships.

Delivering a healthier future: how CCGs are leading the way on prevention and early diagnosis

NHS CLINICAL COMMISSIONERS
2016

Focusing on prevention and early diagnosis, the case studies in this publication demonstrate the impact clinical commissioning groups are making in a wide range of areas including mental health care, early diagnosis of cancer and stroke prevention. They show how CCGs are taking the lead in preventing illness and the causes of ill health – and working to keep people out of hospital where possible; how they are helping to ensure that people are diagnosed earlier and given the support that they need; and they are working across boundaries to build on what people want and need to help them lead longer, healthier lives. More specifically the case studies provide examples of: working proactively with older people living with frailty; addressing preventable early deaths; supporting people to prevent and manage diabetes; reducing hospital admissions in people with COPD; managing c. difficile infections in the community; improving access to health services for homeless people; taking a strategic approach to stroke prevention; addressing early diagnosis of cancer; earlier diagnosis and prevention of HIV; improving early diagnosis and treatment of people with atrial fibrillation; working with the voluntary sector; impact of Living Well; and social prescribing to improve outcomes.

Cartwheel Arts- Art for Wellbeing

NHS Heywood, Middleton and Rochdale Clinical Commissioning Group

Cartwheel Art's 'Art for Wellbeing' is a three-year programme in Rochdale and Wigan that delivers courses, workshops and projects to improve mental health. Cartwheel’s mental health projects are run by professional artists, and work towards a tangible final outcome—an exhibition or publication. Each course has a dedicated Emotional Support Worker with a therapeutic background who works alongside the artist.

Peer support for people with dementia resource pack: promoting peer support opportunities for people with dementia

HEALTH INNOVATION NETWORK SOUTH LONDON
2015

Bringing together examples of good practice and evidence-based guidance, the pack aims to help groups and organisations better support people with dementia in their communities. The pack was developed in partnership with leading dementia and older people charities, with contributions from Innovations in Dementia, The Alzheimer’s Society, AGE UK and Mental Health Foundation. The Health Innovation Network dementia team worked with people with dementia across south London to provide case studies and contribute to the films within the pack. The guide includes: information about what peer support is and how different types of groups can support people with dementia; why peer support can help people with dementia stay connected with their communities; guidance and resources to help people who want to run groups for or including people with dementia; and some ideas for how to tell if the group is doing well.

Putting older people first: our vision for the next five years. A whole system approach to meeting housing, health and wellbeing outcomes for our older populations in South West England

OXFORD BROOKES UNIVERSITY. Institute of Public Care
2015

This document by the South West Housing LIN leadership sets out a vision for a whole system approach to meeting housing, health and wellbeing outcomes for the older population in South West England over the next 5 years. It highlights: the aims and objectives of the group; specific issues facing the sector in the region; and examples of innovative practice and the group’s priorities over the next 5 years. These include: supporting initiatives which contribute to more integrated approaches to service design and delivery; promoting the development of new models of care based in and around the housing services, taking the opportunities these present to develop community based, local services and highlight the benefits of taking co-productive and inclusive approaches to service design; building an evidence base which shows how housing and housing related services contribute to the wider health and social care agenda, through prevention, as well as supporting the management of long term conditions; raising awareness around dementia, including how housing organisations can enable people living with dementia, and their carers, to live independently within the community; and raising awareness about the potential that technologies offer in supporting older people to live independently, and seeking to address the barriers to wider adoption.

From evidence into action: opportunities to protect and improve the nation's health

PUBLIC HEALTH ENGLAND
2014

Strategic document setting out Public Health England's priorities for the next five years. The report provides a brief overview of the state of health in England today, the key health drivers, prevention plans, and future trends. It identifies and examines seven priorities for PHE working with local and central government, clinical commissioning groups and the wider NHS, universities, industry, employers, and the voluntary and community sector. These are: tackling obesity; reducing smoking; reducing harmful drinking; ensuring every child has the best start in life; reducing dementia risk; tackling antimicrobial resistance; and reducing tuberculosis.

Peer support for people with dementia: a social return on investment (SROI) study

SEMPLE Amy, WILLIS Elizabeth, de WAAL Hugo
2015

Reports on a study using Social Return on Investment (SROI) analysis to examine the impact and social value of peer support groups as an intervention for people with dementia. Three peer support groups in South London participated in the study. A separate SROI analysis was carried out for each individual group to find out what people valued about the groups and how they helped them. The report presents the outcomes for each group, the indicators for evidencing these outcomes and the quality and duration of outcomes experienced. It then provides detail on the methodology used to calculate the impact and the social return on investment. Overall, the study found that peer support groups provide positive outcomes for people with dementia, their carers and the volunteers who support the groups. The benefits of participating in peer support groups included: reduced isolation and loneliness; increased stimulation, including mental stimulation; and increased wellbeing. Carers experienced a reduction in carer stress, carer burden and reduction in the feeling of loneliness. Volunteers had an increased sense of wellbeing through their engagement with the group, improved knowledge of dementia and gained transferrable skills. Overall the study found that for every pound (£) of investment the social value created by the three groups evaluated ranged from £1.17 to £5.18.

The value of peer support on cognitive improvement amongst older people living with dementia

CHAKKALACKAL Lauren
2014

Peer support can play a critical role in improving the wellbeing, social support and practical coping strategies of older people living with dementia. This paper describes selected findings from the Mental Health Foundation’s evaluation of three peer support groups for people living with dementia in extra-care housing schemes. It highlights the groups as a promising approach for maintaining cognitive faculties, reducing social isolation, increasing social networks and improving overall wellbeing. A mixed-method study design examined the impact of the groups on participants’ wellbeing, managing memory, independent living skills and social support. Participants reported positive impact from taking part in the support groups for wellbeing, social support and practical coping strategies. Participants also reported positive benefits of the groups on communication abilities, managing memory and managing their lives. Peer support groups in extra-care housing schemes address the psychological, social and emotional needs of people with dementia. This evaluation adds to the literature on the effectiveness of these interventions for those with cognitive impairment.

Beyond fighting fires: the role of the fire and rescue service in improving the public's health

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2015

The case studies contained within this publication explore the activities of fire and rescue service to help the most vulnerable individuals and families in their communities. The trust placed in these services and the comprehensive access to the public that this provides means they have a unique ability to provide critical interventions, promote health messages and refer to appropriate services. These case studies include programmes spread across England, covering both rural and urban environments and with varying levels of deprivation and affluence. They show a range of ways in which the fire and rescue service supports prevention and contributes to tackling health inequalities by: supporting people with dementia; using firefighters to be ‘health champions’; tackling child obesity; reaching out to the most vulnerable; looking out for babies and toddlers; getting people active; working with others to save lives; and reducing falls in the home.

Results 31 - 40 of 56

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