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Results for 'digital technology'

Results 1 - 10 of 20

Helping to tackle loneliness through open data on local services: research report

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2020

This document sets out the findings and emerging recommendations from a project to explore how better management of data can provide a more reliable, more trusted, more accessible and more extensive set of information about local activities, services and support to tackle loneliness. From June 2019 to March 2020, three pilot areas, Elmbridge District Council, Hull City Council and Blackburn with Darwen Council, have been investigating efficient ways of collecting information, exploring how a range of stakeholders can play a role in capturing data and helping keep it up to date and testing and refining underpinning data standards and taxonomies. Section two of this report sets out the issues that exist and the benefits that can be achieved through improving how information is managed locally. Section three introduces the pilots and then relays some of the related experiences and decisions in the course of their involvement. Section four provides summary learning through a maturity model and a broad range of issues, barriers and lessons learned. Section five sets out an outline plan and provides some understanding of the costs and resources that may need to be in place. Section six introduces the technical considerations. The report makes a number of recommendations, calling on place-based leaders to champion the importance and the value of accurate and reliable information about local services in supporting the success of critical initiatives such as social prescribing; and on local partners to work collaboratively and adopt the Open Referral UK standard that has been developed in partnership with the Open Data Community.

Tackling loneliness

BELLIS Alexander, LOFT Philip
2020

This briefing examines the Government loneliness strategy ‘A connected society: a strategy for tackling loneliness – laying the foundations for change’ and the steps taken so far by the Government. The strategy set out a wide variety of cross-departmental measures that the Government would take to provide 'national leadership' to tackle loneliness in England. The paper focuses in particular on progress made in relation to social prescribing; community infrastructure – housing, community spaces, transport, digital inclusion, arts, culture and leisure; and targeted support. The briefing also looks at research into the causes and impact of loneliness and possible interventions. The impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on loneliness is also considered, alongside the measures introduced by the Government in response. Finally, this paper briefly outlines the situation in Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland.

Promising approaches revisited: supplementary case studies

JOPLING Kate
2020

This supplement is a companion piece to the report Promising Approaches Revisited: Effective action on loneliness in later life. That report sets out the different elements needed for effective action to reduce loneliness. These case studies show the framework in action, illustrating how each element may work in practice. They cover: connectors services, including social prescribing; direct solution including group-based interventions and one-to-one approaches; gateway infrastructure such as digital technology and the built environment; and neighbourhood approaches.

Rapid review of reviews: what remotely delivered interventions can reduce social isolation and loneliness among older adults? Executive summary

BOULTON Elisabeth R., et al
2020

Background: During the 2020 coronavirus (COVID-19) crisis, millions of older adults (70+) across the UK (and elsewhere) are being advised to be particularly stringent about social distancing, and to avoid contact with those outside their household. Social distancing places them at even higher risk than normal of social isolation and loneliness, which can adversely affect quality of life, wellbeing and mental health, and are associated with physical ill health and mortality. Methodology: the researchers followed a ‘review of reviews’ methodology to synthesise evidence from related (but differing) remote interventions for social isolation and loneliness, to help inform decisions about different approaches. Findings: the review reports on the following interventions: supported video-communication interventions; telephone befriending; online discussion groups and forums; social networking sites and multi-tool interventions (PC, training, messaging, chat groups). Interventions vary greatly, making it difficult to isolate the effective elements. Concepts of loneliness and social isolation vary, making comparisons and conclusions challenging. Conclusion: the findings from this review do not lead to recommending particular modes of delivering befriending, social support, or low intensity psychological interventions (e.g. videoconferencing, telephone calls, chat rooms or forums), but they do suggest that the characteristics identified through the detailed analysis of components should be incorporated into the delivery of an intervention.

Video calls for reducing social isolation and loneliness in older people: a rapid review (Review)

NOONE Chris, et al
2020

A rapid review to assess the effectiveness of video calls for reducing social isolation and loneliness in older adults. The review also sought to address the effectiveness of video calls on reducing symptoms of depression and improving quality of life. Selection criteria: Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi‐RCTs (including cluster designs) were eligible for inclusion. Main results: Three cluster quasi-randomised trials, which together included 201 participants were included in this review. The included studies compared video call interventions to usual care in nursing homes. None of these studies were conducted during the COVID-19 pandemic. Each study measured loneliness using the UCLA Loneliness Scale. The evidence was very uncertain and suggests that video calls may result in little to no difference in scores on the Geriatric Depression Scale compared to usual care at three months' follow-up. Conclusion: Based on this review there is currently very uncertain evidence on the effectiveness of video call interventions to reduce loneliness in older adults. The review did not include any studies that reported evidence of the effectiveness of video call interventions to address social isolation in older adults. The evidence regarding the effectiveness of video calls for outcomes of symptoms of depression was very uncertain. Future research in this area needs to use more rigorous methods and more diverse and representative participants.

Ageing Better in Camden: interim evaluation report

REMBISZEWSKI Perla, BIDEY Tim, VANSON Tim
2018

The first of two interim evaluation reports to explore the outcomes projects commissioned by Ageing Better in Camden (ABC), a six-year programme to address social isolation and loneliness in older people living in Camden. This report focuses on the progress of 8 projects, which include a Digital Inclusion project; North London Cares Intergenerational and Men’s Action projects; Community Action Projects, and LGBT+ Connect providing opportunities for older Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Trans people in Camden to socialise. Each project focused chapter includes details of participants, evidence of impact and individual case studies. The evaluation draws on qualitative data from conversations with project participants and project leads, as well as quantitative data from demographic surveys. Early findings suggest that the projects are achieving the anticipated positive impacts for older people. Positive impacts include: improved mental and physical well-being; new friendships and connections; improved confidence and independence; relationship building across communities and generations. The evaluation found that frontline staff played a key role in enabling participants to achieve positive impacts.

Designing digital skills interventions for older people

PIERCY Laurence
2019

The internet and digital technologies can play a valuable role in supporting older and disabled people to improve health and wellbeing and gain easier access to health and care services. This report brings together recommendations for designing digital skills interventions for older people with care and support needs. It draws on insights from pathfinders in Sunderland and Thanet, which were funded by NHS Digital and supported by Good Things Foundation as part of the Widening Digital Participation programme. The pathfinders generated insights on small system-level changes that can embed digital inclusion in social care support and factors influencing digital inclusion within social housing schemes. The pilots also highlight the importance of engaging people at the right time when they can find relevance and value in technology. A list of useful resources are also included.

Combatting social isolation and increasing social participation of older adults through the use of technology: a systematic review of existing evidence

BAKER Steven, et al
2018

Objectives: There are growing concerns that social isolation presents risks to older people's health and well‐being. Thus, the objective of the review was to explore how technology is currently being utilised to combat social isolation and increase social participation, hence improving social outcomes for older people. Methods: A systematic review of the literature was conducted across the social science and human‐computer interaction databases. Results: A total of 36 papers met the inclusion criteria and were analysed using a four‐step process. Findings were threefold, suggesting that: (i) technologies principally utilised social network services and touch‐screen technologies; (ii) social outcomes are often ill‐defined or not defined at all; and (iii) methodologies used to evaluate interventions were often limited and small‐scale. Conclusion: Results suggest a need for studies that examine new and innovative forms of technology, evaluated with rigorous methodologies, and drawing on clear definitions about how these technologies address social isolation/participation. Policy Impact: This systematic review explores how technology is currently being utilised to combat social isolation and increase social participation for older people. A unique aspect of this review is that it incorporates smaller design studies and prototypes. These insights will benefit those considering the potential for information and communication technologies to contribute to older adults’ health and well‐being. Practice Impact: This systematic review explores how technology is currently being utilised to combat social isolation and increase social participation for older people. Insights from the review will benefit practitioners seeking to understand the broad range of technologies that are being applied to these issues, and the common benefits and challenges associated with each approach.

An evidence summary of health inequalities in older populations in coastal and rural areas: full report

PUBLIC HEALTH ENGLAND
2019

A rapid evidence review on the health inequalities experienced by older people in coastal and rural areas, supplemented with case studies. The review aimed to identify key determinants of health inequalities experienced by older populations in coastal and rural areas; looks at the strengths and assets of ageing populations in these areas; reviews the effectiveness health and social care system interventions and whole system approaches; and assess the opportunities for using digital technology. In addition to a rapid review of the national literature (covering the UK and Ireland), a search of international literature focusing on interventions to reduce health inequalities was also carried out. It is intended for local authorities, clinical commissioning groups and other health and care organisations to inform strategic planning, service design and commissioning, as well as the development of local community infrastructure. It also provides summary of key considerations in taking an asset-based approach in reducing inequalities and promoting productive healthy ageing in these areas. Two accompanying reports have also been published, an executive summary with main messages and an annex of included studies.

User requirements for technology to assist aging in place: qualitative study of older people and their informal support networks

ELERS Phoebe, et al
2018

BACKGROUND:Informal support is essential for enabling many older people to age in place. However, there is limited research examining the information needs of older adults' informal support networks and how these could be met through home monitoring and information and communication technologies. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to investigate how technologies that connect older adults to their informal and formal support networks could assist ageing in place and enhance older adults' health and well-being. METHODS: Semistructured interviews were conducted with 10 older adults and a total of 31 members of their self-identified informal support networks. They were asked questions about their information needs and how technology could support the older adults to age in place. The interviews were transcribed and thematically analysed. RESULTS: The analysis identified three overarching themes: (1) the social enablers theme, which outlined how timing, informal support networks, and safety concerns assist the older adults' uptake of technology, (2) the technology concerns theme, which outlined concerns about cost, usability, information security and privacy, and technology superseding face-to-face contact, and (3) the information desired theme, which outlined what information should be collected and transferred and who should make decisions about this. CONCLUSIONS: Older adults and their informal support networks may be receptive to technology that monitors older adults within the home if it enables ageing in place for longer. However, cost, privacy, security, and usability barriers would need to be considered and the system should be individualizable to older adults' changing needs. The user requirements identified from this study and described in this paper have informed the development of a technology that is currently being prototyped.

Results 1 - 10 of 20

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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