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Results for 'disabilities'

Results 1 - 10 of 14

Intermediate Care in Cookson's Nursing Home

Somerset Care and Yeovil District Hospital

Cookson’s Court nursing home was opened by Somerset Care in September 2015 with one floor of the new facility reserved solely for the use of the company’s new intermediate care/reablement service, delivered in collaboration with Yeovil District Hospital. “There are no words to express my gratitude, thank you with all my heart. I’ve been born again.” (Service user feedback). In part a response to poor delayed discharge performance in the Somerset area, the collaboration aims to: improve patient flow at Yeovil District Hospital and reduce lengths of stay; provide a reablement focused environment; and improve clinical outcomes and reduce costs.

The state of Shared Lives in England: report 2017

SHARED LIVES PLUS
2017

This report draws a survey of Shared Lives schemes in England to provide an analysis of services across England for the period 2015/16. The report provides figures on the numbers of people who use Shared Lives services, the type of arrangements they live in (live-in, short break and day support), the regional breakdown of services, the number and characteristics of carers, and staffing levels. The report finds that the Shared Lives sector has grown by 5 per cent over the past year, with approximately 11880 people being supported in Shared Lives arrangements. People with learning disabilities remained the primary users of the service, making up 71 percent of all users. This is despite a small reduction in the number of people with learning disabilities accessing the service in the previous year. The next largest group getting help from Shared Lives were people with mental health problems, who made up 8 per cent of users. Short case studies are included to illustrate the benefits of Shared Lives schemes. It ends with key learning from the past year and identifies some of the key factors and barriers to the successful expansion of Shared Lives.

The state of Shared Lives in England: report 2016

SHARED LIVES PLUS
2016

This report draws on a survey of Shared Lives Plus members across the country to provide an analysis of services across England, covering the period 2014/15. The report includes figures on numbers of people using Shared Lives services, the number of carers, staff turnover and motivation, types of arrangement (live in, short breaks and day support) and numbers of users by region. The results show that the number of people using Shared Lives support is continuing to rise. In 2014/15 11,570 people were getting help from Shared Lives compared to 10,440 in 2013/14. People with learning disabilities remain the primary users of Shared Lives support, accounting for 76% of all users. The next largest group getting help via Shared Lives were people with mental health problems who made up 7% of users. The survey also reports a rise in both the number of older people and people with dementia using Shared Lives. There has also been an increase of over 50% in use of Shared Lives as day support. Projected cost savings are provided to show the total savings that could be made if Shared Lives reached its full potential. Short case studies are also included to illustrate the benefits of Shared Lives schemes.

Report on the DFG summit: hosted by the College of Occupational Therapists and Foundations in December 2015

ASTRAL PUBLIC SERVICES
2016

A summary of the main points raised at the Disabled Facilities Grant summit together with some apposite case studies showing what works well now. Disabled facilities grants are a national housing grant available to adults and children with a disability to facilitate access to and within the property. The grant is available to all owner occupiers, private and housing association tenants subject to a statutory means test. The meeting discussed five key questions about DFGs and their context within the wider theme of people remaining independent in the community, regardless of their means. The questions are: what works well in current practice; how to improve customer service; how to support self-funders; how to collaborate better with other services; and how to redesign services for the future. The document closes with major themes that emerged from the day together with some key recommendations of what can be changed nationally and locally to advance collaborative systems, prevention and DFG regulations.

Prevention: a shared commitment: making the case for a Prevention Transformation Fund

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2015

This document identifies and collates key pieces of evidence about the cost effectiveness of prevention in order to make the case for greater investment in prevention interventions. The report recommends that the Government should introduce a Prevention Transformation Fund, worth at least £2 billion annually. This would enable some double running of new investment in preventative services alongside ‘business as usual’ in the current system, until savings can be realised and reinvested into the system – as part of wider local prevention strategies. Based on the analysis of an extensive range of intervention case studies that have provided a net cost benefit, the report suggests that investment in prevention could yield a net return of 90 per cent.

Building community capacity: the economic case in adult social care in England

PERSONAL SOCIAL SERVICES RESEARCH UNIT
2015

This briefing summarises the findings of a study to establish the costs, outputs and outcomes of a number of four best practice community capacity-building projects, especially in relation to their potential for alleviating pressures on adult social care budgets and in the context of current policy interests. All projects worked under financial uncertainties and these challenges highlighted a poor fit between third sector infrastructures and the public sector’s growing requirements for targeted, evidence-based investments. The four projects evaluated comprised support services for people with disabilities, a help-at-home scheme for older people, a training scheme to produce local health champions and a peer-support project for people with mental health issues. Such third sector approaches may postpone or replace formal social care, but projects found it difficult to meet demands for data, whether for making a business case or for the purposes of research. The study found that well-targeted schemes have the potential to produce both benefits to participants and substantial savings to public agencies. Yet the current commissioning context tends to encourage organisations to focus on established priorities rather than to develop innovative, community-based services.

Taking on and taking over: choice and control for physically disabled young adults

MITCHELL Wendy, et al
2015

Summarises the findings of a study on approaches to supporting physically disabled young adults to achieve their preferred levels of control over care and support arrangements. The study took place between July 2012 and January 2014 and involved semi-structured interviews with young adults, parents and social care professionals. It examined physically disabled young adults experiences of managing their care and support arrangements and explored how they can be better supported. Key findings and practice implications are included. While welcoming the opportunities afforded by personalised approaches within adult social care, almost all the young adults described feeling daunted by the associated responsibilities, with managing personal assistants/carers consistently identified as the most difficult aspect of having a Direct Payment. Young adults found information from statutory services was typically targeted at other audiences, for example, older people and only a minority believed transition planning/support services had played a significant role in preparing them for taking on a Personal Budget. Social workers with more experience of working with young adults identified specific issues that need to be accommodated including: young adults’ relative lack of life skills and experience; young adults’ preferences regarding parental involvement; and addressing parents’ support needs.

Improving later life: vulnerability and resilience in older people

AGE UK
2015

A summary of the available evidence regarding the maintenance of resilience in older people, examining some of the factors and experiences that make older people more susceptible to the risk of adverse outcomes and exploring strategies to help build resilience in later life. The key topics covered are: social engagement; resources, including financial resources, housing and age-friendly neighbourhoods; health and disability; cognitive and mental health; and carers. The paper makes a number of recommendations, including: adopt a holistic view of all kinds of vulnerability in later life as the main focus rather concentrating on parts of the problem or parts of the body; make better use of the research evidence to identify problems earlier and to target resources; concentrate more on combating the effects of neighbourhood deprivation; work towards providing an age-friendly environment; facilitate home adaptations, aids and a better range of housing options; and root out ageism among professionals and society in general.

Our support, our lives: joining up the public services used by disabled people

DAVIES Alissa
2015

Examines how health and social care integration can work better for working-age disabled people in the care system and applies key lessons and themes from integrated care and disabled people’s definitions of independent living to a wider range of public services. The report draws on desktop analysis of the impact of current integrated care initiatives on working-age disabled people, findings from interviews and focus groups with disabled adults, and Scope’s Better Care Project research. It argues that while the drivers behind integration have mostly been considered in the context of the ageing population the evidence strongly indicates that disabled adults should become a priority group for integrated care, alongside older people. It suggests that existing integrated care initiatives are not going far enough and considers how the Better Care Fund, Integrated Care Pioneers and Integrated Personal Commissioning can do more to improve outcomes for disabled adults. To help ensure the full potential of integrated care is full realised, the report identifies key action points on the following three fronts: incentives and rewards for independent living; a longer-term approach to risks and benefits; and making it clearer whether schemes apply to disabled adults. The report concludes that future plans for joined up support should apply the lessons from existing integrated care initiatives to the wider integrated support agenda, addressing all the barriers to independent living and encompassing education, work, volunteering, welfare and housing.

The bigger picture: understanding disability and care in England’s older population

LLOYD James, ROSS Andy
2014

Explores disability and care at a national, regional and local authority level in England. The report brings together data from Census 2011, DWP and HSCIC ‘administrative data’, as well as from Wave 6 of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing, to look at the prevalence of disability, need and care of different types, and to paint a picture of the lives of different groups. In particular, Chapter 3 provides a snapshot of disability and care in the older population in England, identifying key results. Chapter 4 looks in detail at the lives of older people with limited day-to-day activities, from their health characteristics to their living situation. Chapter 5 explores the characteristics of older people receiving unpaid and paid care including the overall adequacy of their care, as well as older people with substantial levels of disability who experience difficulty undertaking three or more ‘activities of daily living’. Chapter 6 explores the interaction of older people experiencing limited day-to-day activities with public support, i.e. disability benefits and the local authority care and support system. Chapter 7 examines the prevalence of unpaid older carers and the outcomes they experience, as well as the extent of local authority support for them. The report shows that around half of the 65+ population in England reported their day-to-day activities were limited. Of the 6.7 per cent of the older population living at home in England who reported difficulty undertaking three or more activities of daily living, around 70,000 did not receive any care, and could therefore be classed as experiencing substantial unmet need. Around 20 per cent of older carers experienced self-care (ADL) difficulties themselves.

Results 1 - 10 of 14

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