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Results for 'disabilities'

Results 1 - 10 of 17

Disabled Facilities Grant (DFG) and other adaptations: external review

MACKINTOSH Shelia, et al
2018

This review, commissioned by the Department of Health and Social Care, looks at how the Disabled Facilities Grant (DFG) currently operates and makes evidence based recommendations for how it should change in the future. It review aims to develop more effective ways of supporting more people to live in suitable housing so they can stay independent for longer and makes the case for more joint working across housing, health and social care. The focus of the review is on how the disabled or older person can be put at the centre of service provision and what would make it easier for them to access services. It also looks at the role of DFG in prevention and how it can deliver this more effectively. It draws on a range of evidence, including: analysis of data from LOGASnet returns; consultation events attended by local authorities and home improvement agencies; interviews with staff from selected local authorities; and a short review of the academic, policy and practice literature. The conclusions and recommendations include: renaming the grant to reflect that it is part of a broader set interventions to help people remain independent; improved integration of services; better partnership working between health and care and different professions; raising the upper limit of the grant; and changes to the current formula for allocating funding; and updating of the existing means testing regulations. The review also identifies additional research to be carried out.

Gig buddies: project report: January 2013 - December 2014

STAY UP LATE
2015

This evaluation report looks at how the Gig Buddies scheme has developed, the lessons learned, and the way support is offered to people to be less socially isolated while new types of volunteers are created in the process. Gig Buddies is a project that pairs up people with and without learning disabilities in Sussex to be friends and to go to events together. This report also looks at the plans to replicate Gig Buddies as a social franchise (‘Gig Buddies in a box’) by sharing experience and creating a model that enables replication, whilst also protecting the integrity of the project. The report argues that the pilot project demonstrates that Gig Buddies has the potential to transform communities, enabling many more people with learning disabilities and autism to be less socially isolated and unleashing the capacity of communities to become more involved in voluntary work.

Housing adaptations

AUDITOR GENERAL FOR WALES
2018

This report assesses whether organisations with responsibilities for delivering housing adaptations in Wales - which include local authorities, housing associations and Care and Repair agencies - have an effective approach that delivers value for money. It finds that the current system needs to change in order to meet the needs of older and disabled people. The review involved fieldwork at five local authorities and four housing associations, a survey of people who had received adaptations; and an analysis of data and expenditure on current services. It reports that although users express high levels of satisfaction with housing adaptations, the system is complex, reactive and results in people with similar needs often receiving different standards of service because of where they live and who is providing the service. Although public bodies are aware of the benefits of adaptations in supporting independence, ineffective partnership working results in missed opportunities to address needs and avoid and reduce demand and costs in health and social care services. The report makes nine recommendations for improvement, including: for the Welsh Government to set a minimum standard for adaptation work, so people can receive the same standard wherever they live; for local authorities to work more closely with partner agencies who deliver adaptations and streamline the application and delivery processes; and the provision of more accessible versions of information to the public.

Intermediate Care in Cookson's Nursing Home

Somerset Care and Yeovil District Hospital

Cookson’s Court nursing home was opened by Somerset Care in September 2015 with one floor of the new facility reserved solely for the use of the company’s new intermediate care/reablement service, delivered in collaboration with Yeovil District Hospital. “There are no words to express my gratitude, thank you with all my heart. I’ve been born again.” (Service user feedback). In part a response to poor delayed discharge performance in the Somerset area, the collaboration aims to: improve patient flow at Yeovil District Hospital and reduce lengths of stay; provide a reablement focused environment; and improve clinical outcomes and reduce costs.

The state of Shared Lives in England: report 2017

SHARED LIVES PLUS
2017

This report draws a survey of Shared Lives schemes in England to provide an analysis of services across England for the period 2015/16. The report provides figures on the numbers of people who use Shared Lives services, the type of arrangements they live in (live-in, short break and day support), the regional breakdown of services, the number and characteristics of carers, and staffing levels. The report finds that the Shared Lives sector has grown by 5 per cent over the past year, with approximately 11880 people being supported in Shared Lives arrangements. People with learning disabilities remained the primary users of the service, making up 71 percent of all users. This is despite a small reduction in the number of people with learning disabilities accessing the service in the previous year. The next largest group getting help from Shared Lives were people with mental health problems, who made up 8 per cent of users. Short case studies are included to illustrate the benefits of Shared Lives schemes. It ends with key learning from the past year and identifies some of the key factors and barriers to the successful expansion of Shared Lives.

The state of Shared Lives in England: report 2016

SHARED LIVES PLUS
2016

This report draws on a survey of Shared Lives Plus members across the country to provide an analysis of services across England, covering the period 2014/15. The report includes figures on numbers of people using Shared Lives services, the number of carers, staff turnover and motivation, types of arrangement (live in, short breaks and day support) and numbers of users by region. The results show that the number of people using Shared Lives support is continuing to rise. In 2014/15 11,570 people were getting help from Shared Lives compared to 10,440 in 2013/14. People with learning disabilities remain the primary users of Shared Lives support, accounting for 76% of all users. The next largest group getting help via Shared Lives were people with mental health problems who made up 7% of users. The survey also reports a rise in both the number of older people and people with dementia using Shared Lives. There has also been an increase of over 50% in use of Shared Lives as day support. Projected cost savings are provided to show the total savings that could be made if Shared Lives reached its full potential. Short case studies are also included to illustrate the benefits of Shared Lives schemes.

Report on the DFG summit: hosted by the College of Occupational Therapists and Foundations in December 2015

ASTRAL PUBLIC SERVICES
2016

A summary of the main points raised at the Disabled Facilities Grant summit together with some apposite case studies showing what works well now. Disabled facilities grants are a national housing grant available to adults and children with a disability to facilitate access to and within the property. The grant is available to all owner occupiers, private and housing association tenants subject to a statutory means test. The meeting discussed five key questions about DFGs and their context within the wider theme of people remaining independent in the community, regardless of their means. The questions are: what works well in current practice; how to improve customer service; how to support self-funders; how to collaborate better with other services; and how to redesign services for the future. The document closes with major themes that emerged from the day together with some key recommendations of what can be changed nationally and locally to advance collaborative systems, prevention and DFG regulations.

Prevention: a shared commitment: making the case for a Prevention Transformation Fund

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2015

This document identifies and collates key pieces of evidence about the cost effectiveness of prevention in order to make the case for greater investment in prevention interventions. The report recommends that the Government should introduce a Prevention Transformation Fund, worth at least £2 billion annually. This would enable some double running of new investment in preventative services alongside ‘business as usual’ in the current system, until savings can be realised and reinvested into the system – as part of wider local prevention strategies. Based on the analysis of an extensive range of intervention case studies that have provided a net cost benefit, the report suggests that investment in prevention could yield a net return of 90 per cent.

Building community capacity: the economic case in adult social care in England

PERSONAL SOCIAL SERVICES RESEARCH UNIT
2015

This briefing summarises the findings of a study to establish the costs, outputs and outcomes of a number of four best practice community capacity-building projects, especially in relation to their potential for alleviating pressures on adult social care budgets and in the context of current policy interests. All projects worked under financial uncertainties and these challenges highlighted a poor fit between third sector infrastructures and the public sector’s growing requirements for targeted, evidence-based investments. The four projects evaluated comprised support services for people with disabilities, a help-at-home scheme for older people, a training scheme to produce local health champions and a peer-support project for people with mental health issues. Such third sector approaches may postpone or replace formal social care, but projects found it difficult to meet demands for data, whether for making a business case or for the purposes of research. The study found that well-targeted schemes have the potential to produce both benefits to participants and substantial savings to public agencies. Yet the current commissioning context tends to encourage organisations to focus on established priorities rather than to develop innovative, community-based services.

Taking on and taking over: choice and control for physically disabled young adults

MITCHELL Wendy, et al
2015

Summarises the findings of a study on approaches to supporting physically disabled young adults to achieve their preferred levels of control over care and support arrangements. The study took place between July 2012 and January 2014 and involved semi-structured interviews with young adults, parents and social care professionals. It examined physically disabled young adults experiences of managing their care and support arrangements and explored how they can be better supported. Key findings and practice implications are included. While welcoming the opportunities afforded by personalised approaches within adult social care, almost all the young adults described feeling daunted by the associated responsibilities, with managing personal assistants/carers consistently identified as the most difficult aspect of having a Direct Payment. Young adults found information from statutory services was typically targeted at other audiences, for example, older people and only a minority believed transition planning/support services had played a significant role in preparing them for taking on a Personal Budget. Social workers with more experience of working with young adults identified specific issues that need to be accommodated including: young adults’ relative lack of life skills and experience; young adults’ preferences regarding parental involvement; and addressing parents’ support needs.

Results 1 - 10 of 17

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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