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Results for 'early intervention'

Results 1 - 10 of 26

Interventions to promote early discharge and avoid inappropriate hospital (re)admission: a systematic review

COFFEY Alice, et al
2019

Increasing pressure on limited healthcare resources has necessitated the development of measures promoting early discharge and avoiding inappropriate hospital (re)admission. This systematic review examines the evidence for interventions in acute hospitals including (i) hospital-patient discharge to home, community services or other settings, (ii) hospital discharge to another care setting, and (iii) reduction or prevention of inappropriate hospital (re)admissions. Academic electronic databases were searched from 2005 to 2018. In total, ninety-four eligible papers were included. Interventions were categorized into: (1) pre-discharge exclusively delivered in the acute care hospital, (2) pre- and post-discharge delivered by acute care hospital, (3) post-discharge delivered at home and (4) delivered only in a post-acute facility. Mixed results were found regarding the effectiveness of many types of interventions. Interventions exclusively delivered in the acute hospital pre-discharge and those involving education were most common but their effectiveness was limited in avoiding (re)admission. Successful pre- and post-discharge interventions focused on multidisciplinary approaches. Post-discharge interventions exclusively delivered at home reduced hospital stay and contributed to patient satisfaction. Existing systematic reviews on tele-health and long-term care interventions suggest insufficient evidence for admission avoidance. The most effective interventions to avoid inappropriate re-admission to hospital and promote early discharge included integrated systems between hospital and the community care, multidisciplinary service provision, individualization of services, discharge planning initiated in hospital and specialist follow-up.

The swing to early intervention and prevention and its implications for social work

GRAY Mel
2014

Social investment does not yet appear to have entered the social work lexicon yet reflects a shift toward early intervention and prevention and policies relating to early childhood education and care across the world. Recently, the prime minister of Australia announced new measures relating to childcare to ease the burden on working families and ensure high-standard care for pre-school children. Also announced was a mental health check to be administered by general practitioners for children as young as three years old. This change in social policy follows closely on the heels of the backlash against ameliorative welfare and move toward the preventive end of the social care spectrum. This paper examines developments leading to the social investment approach. It begins by defining social investment and providing an overview of key theorists contributing to our understanding of what ‘social investment is investing in’ and ends with a discussion of its implications for social work.

A toolkit to support the commissioning of targeted preventative services: South West regional commissioning

SOUTH WEST JOINT IMPROVEMENT PARTNERSHIP
2010

This toolkit was developed by the Institute of Public Care to help commissioners of adult social care and health services in the South West of England target prevention and early intervention services more effectively, given the prospect of severely limited resources and a significant projected rise in the region’s population of older people. With reduced expenditure per head therefore available, the toolkit aims to help local authorities assess existing services, identify shortcomings, and contribute to the development of new, more effective preventative services. There is a particular focus on identifying individuals likely to come to rely on high-intensity, high-cost services while they are still divertible from that path. This toolkit includes a series of tools templates and performance information frameworks that will help local authorities in the South West and their partners to: develop a more refined framework for understanding the distribution of prevention, early intervention, intervention and substitute support services; analyse the distribution of current services for older people across levels of need and identify where greater targeting of those in need might be effective; and plan how to refocus where greater targeting of those in need might be most effective.

Local Area Coordination: summative evaluation

LUNT Neil, BAINBRIDGE Laura
2019

The results from the third phase of an evaluation of a Local Area Coordination approach developed in York, which involved the introduction of three Local Area Coordinators. The evaluation aimed to identify early outcomes at the level of individuals, families, community and system (including project objectives and cost effectiveness). It also aimed to identify emerging insights and potential future opportunities for data collection, and longitudinal approaches to Local Area Coordination outcomes over a longer timeframe. Methods used included analysis of performance data, review of documentation and interviews with Local Area Coordinators, Programme Managers and community organisations. The findings show that Local Area Coordination is operating as intended, and is providing support to people not previously known to services. People also welcome long-term focus of Local Area Coordinator work. It also identified examples of real changes as a consequence of Local Area Support, including preventative interventions and helping families navigate complex and challenging circumstances.

Reducing older people's need for care: exploring risk factors for loss of independence

WHYARD Julia
2019

An executive summary of a report commissioned by Nottinghamshire County Council to explore recent evidence and identify a set of risk factors to older people’s independence. It explores risk factors in three areas: Social and Psychosocial Domain; Long term or Personal Conditions Domain; and Life Events Domain. Risk factors are then further grouped into: modifiable risk factors such as depression or loneliness, where specific support or services can be offered to minimise their impact; and non-modifiable risk factors such as age or history of falls; which can help identify older people at greater risk and who may potentially benefit from some preventative services and support. The report identifies the following factors as being the most significant, primary risk factors to older people’s independence and institutionalisation: Dementia with co-morbidity; Co-morbidity; carer burden; falls; social isolation and loneliness; poor confidence and self-esteem; and poor perception of own health status. The report also highlights examples of preventative tools and interventions that could stop, delay or defer the need for long-term institutional care for older people. The findings will be used to inform Nottinghamshire County Council’s ongoing local development of an “early warning system”.

Londoners said: an analysis of the Thrive LDN community conversations

DAVIE E., et al
2018

This report presents feedback from 17 community workshops, delivered by Thrive LDN in partnership with the Mental Health Foundation, which asked Londoners how they could be better supported to be mentally healthy. The workshops were attended by over 1,000 Londoners including those who commission, provide and use services. In the workshops Londoners gave their views on how Thrive LDN's six aspirations to improve mental health could be delivered. The report includes quotations from attendees. The solutions shared common themes of spreading knowledge, skills and support so that people can better look after themselves and their neighbours. It shows that as well as wanting access to services, Londoners want to be able to help themselves. The report makes recommendations based on the discussions. These include: the development of a network of community champions to tackle isolation; using technological platforms to inform people about support and activities in their community; supporting the development of non-clinical crisis and other wellbeing centres; and providing support for parents through peer-parenting groups.

Improving outcomes for carers via GP surgeries: implications for commissioners

OXFORD BROOKES UNIVERSITY. Institute of Public Care, CARERS BUCKS
2017

Reports on a pilot project, funded by the Chiltern Clinical Commissioning Group, which sought to help GPs identify previously unknown carers and improve carer experience and wellbeing outcomes. The pilot offered carers a free health and wellbeing check with a carer support worker and a social prescription to access services provided by Carers Bucks where appropriate. The health and wellbeing check used the 'Carers Star' covering seven outcome areas: health, the caring role, managing at home, time for yourself, how you feel, finances, and work. A total of 203 carers attended the carer clinics. Approximately a quarter of carers were caring for someone with dementia and a quarter were caring for someone with a physical disability. Analysis of comments received by carers attending the clinic identified three key themes: carers appreciated the clinics because they felt it was rare for anyone to ‘care’ for them; carers felt listened to; and received useful information about support they did not know existed. The paper maps learning from the project against the Institute of Public Care commissioning cycle and makes recommendations for commissioners.

Evaluation of the Rotherham Carers Resilience Service: final report

DAYSON Chris, BENNETT Ellen
2016

An independent evaluation of the Rotherham Carers Resilience Service, which is delivered in partnership by Crossroads Care Rotherham, Rotherham and Doncaster Alzheimer's Society and Age UK Rotherham on behalf of NHS Rotherham Clinical Commissioning Group. The service provides information, advice and practical support to help carers of people living with dementia to care for the person with dementia at home for as long as possible. The evaluation looked at the impact of the service on carer health and well-being, the effect on patient and carer use of NHS care and resources, and views on the effectiveness of the service. It included interviews with stakeholders including five service staff, one GP, and one representative of the CCG; and questionnaires and interviews with carers using the service; and three in-depth client case studies. The evaluation reports that the service reached more than 330 carers during its first year, from February 2015 to March 2016. Successes of the service included linking carers in to other services from the statutory, voluntary and community sector; providing carers information about benefits entitlements; and access to home based support services. The service was highly valued by beneficiaries and there was evidence for improvement in key outcome measures. These included small numbers of carers reporting better general well-being, better health and improvements in their carer quality of life. There was insufficient evidence to confirm whether the service had reduced the demand for emergency care.

No one should have no one: working to end loneliness amongst older people

MORTIMER Jill
2016

This report aims to raise awareness about the importance of addressing chronic loneliness amongst older people. It looks at recent initiatives of Age UK and includes early findings from ‘Testing Promising Approaches to Reducing Loneliness’, an Age UK programme with eight local Age UKs developed to services to find and help older people experiencing loneliness. Taking a community-based approach to combatting widespread loneliness the programme been successfully reduced isolation among the majority of trial participants. The programme identified learning in a number of areas, including: the benefits of building, developing and joining up local services rather than introducing a range of new services; the need for training to carry out guided conversations to identify people’s needs; that phone calls play an important role as part of a range of services; that there are costs involved in supporting networks and volunteers; and measuring levels and changes in loneliness. The report also highlights the action local councillors and MPs can take to prevent and tackle loneliness.

Support from the start: commissioning early intervention services for mental ill health

NHS CLINICAL COMMISSIONERS
2016

Presents four case studies to show how Clinical Commissioning Groups and their partners are commissioning early intervention initiatives in mental health services. The case studies cover: Hounslow’s Friends for Life programme, which is helping to boost the resilience of young people; Salford’s early intervention in psychosis; Coventry and Warwickshire’s maternal mental health service; Kernow’s suicide liaison service. The case studies outline progress to date and highlight the value of the intervention. The paper also provides six top tips for commissioners early intervention services in mental health.

Results 1 - 10 of 26

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
View more: News
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