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Results for 'economic evaluation'

Results 1 - 10 of 14

Quantifying the benefits of peer support for people with dementia: a social return on investment (SROI) study

WILLIS Elizabeth, SEMPLE Amy C., de WAAL Hugo
2018

Objective: Peer support for people with dementia and carers is routinely advocated in national strategies and policy as a post-diagnostic intervention. However there is limited evidence to demonstrate the value these groups offer. This study looked at three dementia peer support groups in South London to evaluate what outcomes they produce and how much social value they create in relation to the cost of investment. Methods: A Social Return on Investment (SROI) analysis was undertaken, which involves collecting data on the inputs, outputs and outcomes of an intervention, which are put into a formula, the end result being a SROI ratio showing how much social value is created per £1 of investment. Results: Findings showed the three groups created social value ranging from £1.17 to £5.18 for every pound (£) of investment, dependent on the design and structure of the group. Key outcomes for people with dementia were mental stimulation and a reduction in loneliness and isolation. Carers reported a reduction in stress and burden of care. Volunteers cited an increased knowledge of dementia. Conclusions: This study has shown that peer groups for people with dementia produce a social value greater than the cost of investment which provides encouraging evidence for those looking to commission, invest, set up or evaluate peer support groups for people with dementia and carers. Beyond the SROI ratio, this study has shown these groups create beneficial outcomes not only for the group members but also more widely for their carers and the group volunteers.

Making the case for investing in actions to prevent and/or tackle loneliness: a systematic review. A briefing paper

MCDAID David, BAUER Annette, PARK A-La
2017

Summarises findings from a systematic review on the available economic evidence on the cost effectiveness of loneliness interventions for older people. The review found mixed evidence for the cost effectiveness of befriending interventions and the benefits of participation in social activities, ranging from cost saving to cost ineffective interventions. Recent evidence identified suggests that signposting and navigation services have the potential to be cost effective, with a saving of up to £3 of health costs for every £1 invested. The paper also makes suggestions for strengthening the evidence based on the cost effectiveness of interventions to address loneliness.

The social and economic impact of the Rotherham Social Prescribing Pilot: main evaluation report

DAYSON Chris, BASHIR Nadia
2014

Provides a detailed assessment of the social and economic impact of the Rotherham Social Prescribing Pilot from the perspective of key stakeholders. Social prescribing provides a way of linking patients in primary care and their carers with nonmedical sources of support within the community. Over the course of the pilot: 24 voluntary and community organisations (VCOs) received grants with a total value of just over £600,000 to deliver a menu of 31 separate social prescribing services; 1,607 patients were referred to the service, of whom 1,118 were referred on to funded VCS services; the five most common types of funded services referred to were information and advice, community activity, physical activities, befriending and enabling. The evaluation looked at the impact on the demand for hospital care and the economic and social benefits. The findings demonstrate that economic and social outcomes have been created for three main stakeholder groups: patients with LTCs and their carers, who have experienced improved mental health and greater engagement with the community; the local public sector, in particular health bodies, which have benefited from the reduced use of hospital resources; and the local voluntary and community sector, which has benefited from a catalytic investment in community level service provision.

Prevention: a shared commitment: making the case for a Prevention Transformation Fund

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2015

This document identifies and collates key pieces of evidence about the cost effectiveness of prevention in order to make the case for greater investment in prevention interventions. The report recommends that the Government should introduce a Prevention Transformation Fund, worth at least £2 billion annually. This would enable some double running of new investment in preventative services alongside ‘business as usual’ in the current system, until savings can be realised and reinvested into the system – as part of wider local prevention strategies. Based on the analysis of an extensive range of intervention case studies that have provided a net cost benefit, the report suggests that investment in prevention could yield a net return of 90 per cent.

Building community capacity: the economic case in adult social care in England

PERSONAL SOCIAL SERVICES RESEARCH UNIT
2015

This briefing summarises the findings of a study to establish the costs, outputs and outcomes of a number of four best practice community capacity-building projects, especially in relation to their potential for alleviating pressures on adult social care budgets and in the context of current policy interests. All projects worked under financial uncertainties and these challenges highlighted a poor fit between third sector infrastructures and the public sector’s growing requirements for targeted, evidence-based investments. The four projects evaluated comprised support services for people with disabilities, a help-at-home scheme for older people, a training scheme to produce local health champions and a peer-support project for people with mental health issues. Such third sector approaches may postpone or replace formal social care, but projects found it difficult to meet demands for data, whether for making a business case or for the purposes of research. The study found that well-targeted schemes have the potential to produce both benefits to participants and substantial savings to public agencies. Yet the current commissioning context tends to encourage organisations to focus on established priorities rather than to develop innovative, community-based services.

Assessing social care market and provider sustainability: part A: a guide for local authorities

CORDIS BRIGHT
2015

The Care Act 2014 introduces a regime to oversee the financial stability of the hardest-to-replace care providers, and sets out measures to ensure people’s care is not interrupted if any social care or support providers fail. This guidance aims to help local authorities to fulfil their responsibilities in the event of provider failure by: helping them identify whether the failure of a provider will leave people at risk of being without a means of having their care and support needs met; where there is a risk, identifying those providers who are most important to meeting those needs, and; where the critical or hardest to replace providers are not within the Care Quality Commission Market Oversight Regime, assessing and taking action to reduce the risk of failure or the impact of a failure should one occur. The document begins looking at care markets and providers, introducing a suggested approach to categorising and segmenting care markets, as well as outlining the main reasons for provider failure. It then considers how to identify indicators of market sustainability and how to monitor hard-to-replace providers.

Assessing social care market and provider sustainability: part B: toolkit

CORDIS BRIGHT
2015

Provides a framework to help local authorities implement a test of care market sustainability, and offers insights about when a provider requires further monitoring. Many local authorities have developed highly effective systems for gathering local market intelligence in relation to the part of the market with which they contract for services. This intelligence may be gathered both formally and informally and involve a broad range of approaches. This toolkit is designed to complement such approaches by providing a clear structure for local authorities to consider the totality of the local market, only a proportion of which they will directly contract with. There are five phases to the application of the toolkit: determining local market segmentation; evaluation of external indicators; evaluation of sub market composition indicators; forming a judgement on sustainability and deciding which ‘hard to replace’ providers to monitor; and understanding and monitoring the sustainability of ’hard to replace’ providers.

Assessing social care market and provider sustainability: project report

CORDIS BRIGHT
2015

Summarises the methods and approach, discusses the learning and shares knowledge arising from the ‘Assessing social care market and provider sustainability’ project, which has developed guidance and a toolkit for the Department of Health, the Local Government Association, and the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services. These resources are designed to support implementation of the Care Act 2014 and help local authorities fulfil their responsibilities in the event of a care provider failure.

Making the case for public health interventions: public health spending and return on investment

KING'S FUND, LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2014

These infographics from the King's Fund and the Local Government Association set out key facts about the public health system and the return on investment for some public health interventions. They show the changing demographics with a growing ageing population and the impact of social and behavioural determinants on people’s health. The document also highlights the costs of key health and social services and estimates the potential returns on investment on preventative interventions. For instance, Birmingham’s Be Active programme of free use of leisure centres and other initiatives returned an estimated £23 in quality of life, reduced NHS use and other gains for every £1 spent. Every £1 spent on improving homes saves the NHS £70 over 10 years. Befriending services have been estimated to pay back around £3.75 in reduced mental health service spending and improvements in health for every £1 spent. Every £1 spent on drugs treatment saves society £2.50 in reduced NHS and social care costs and reduced crime.

An analysis of the economic impacts of the British Red Cross Support at home service

DIXON Josie, et al
2014

This independent economic evaluation of the British Red Cross Support at Home service focuses on four services which were found to improve outcomes in an earlier British Red Cross evaluation. The services all aim to help people to build their confidence and regain their independence during times of particular difficulty.Those evaluated were 'Next Steps', where volunteers provide home visits and monitor how people are coping following hospital discharge; 'Care in the Home' services delivered by staff and volunteers providing social visits, support and help with household tasks; and a Neighbourhood/Community service in Scotland which focused on linking people to existing services and volunteer-led services such as befriending. The final sample for this analysis consisted of a total of 52 people, the majority of who were over 65. Two outcomes were used in the economic analysis: an increased ability to manage daily activities and improved wellbeing. The evaluation identified cost savings that were related to a reduced need for formal/ informal care and general help around the home; a reduced risk of falls and malnutrition, particularly amongst those with unmet care needs; and, to a lesser degree, a reduced need for treatment of depressive symptoms. The total savings identified amounted to more than five times the cost of the service. The average cost of the intervention was £169 per person (based on the services and sample data in the Red Cross evaluation) and the identified savings came to £880 per person.

Results 1 - 10 of 14

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News

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project New practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia

My Guide: new case example

My Guide: new case example My Guide is a sighted guiding service, started by The Guide Dogs for the Blind Association (Guide Dogs), in which trained volunteers assist blind and partially sighted adults to get out and about, thus helping to prevent social isolation.
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