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Results for 'employment'

Results 1 - 10 of 11

Living well for longer: the economic argument for investing in the health and wellbeing of older people in Wales

EDWARDS Rhiannon Tudor, et al
2018

This report, commissioned by Public Health Wales, explores the economic case for investing in older people in Wales to support people to live longer in good health in older age. It looks at investing in older people as assets, highlighting the importance of their contribution to the economy in Wales and the importance of housing and enabling independence in later life. It then draws on the results of rapid reviews of international and UK evidence to show the relative cost-effectiveness and return on investment on preventing loneliness and social isolation; caring for older carers; and preventing falls. It concludes that enabling people to work for longer, facilitating volunteering and supporting working parents through care of grandchildren brings many economic returns in terms of improving wellbeing; reducing loneliness, and supporting formal and wider community services. In addition co-production enables older people to remain active in the community and provides intergenerational benefits within the community and public sector services. The report concludes that Wales should focus investment on: fully integrated health and care services; maintaining physical and mental well being in older age, with a focus on reducing social isolation and loneliness; maintaining services to promote prevention (particularly falls prevention), rehabilitation and reablement; investment in sustainable homes, transport and communities; and support for informal carers.

Community development in health: a literature review


2016

This literature review offers a brief background to the current state of play in the NHS and statutory services, and ideas that services more flexible, place-based services are likely to offer more effective and efficient outcomes. It then provides an overview of the nature of community development, its relationship to community health and to enhancing the responsiveness of commissioning of services. It brings together evidence which shows how communities can be supported to develop their own strengths and their own trajectories of development. It also examines the health benefits of community engagement, and identifies the limitations of some studies and where evidence that suggests poor outcomes or risks. It looks developing a business case, and what is already known of costs and benefits of community development. It finds that although it is difficult to express costs and benefits of community development in monetary terms, some effective techniques do exist. The evidence shows that community development helps to strengthen and increase social networks and therefore build up social capital. Evidence shows that they to contribute significantly to individual and to community health and resilience. Existing data also suggests that community development in health is cost-effective and provides good value for money. The review includes definitions of community development and key related concepts, including as asset-based approaches, co-production, social networks, social capital, and community capital.

Social prescribing: a pathway to work?

STEADMAN Karen, THOMAS Rosemary, DONNALOJA Victoria
2017

This paper considers the social prescribing model through an employment lens. An initial review of the grey and academic literature uncovered little reference to the role of work in this context. This has not been a key feature of previous large-scale studies on social prescribing, which is itself a relatively new area of research and practice. The study took a two stage exploratory approach, comprising: a short survey with members of the UK Social Prescribing Network to better understand their experience of social prescribing, and where work fits in their views; and four case studies of social prescribing services, to explore how each service works, is delivered and experienced by clients in order to learn how social prescribing is, in practice, achieving a wide range of health and social outcomes, potentially including work. The aim of social prescribing is to help individuals find non-clinical solutions which will improve their health and wellbeing. Though it is unlikely that people will access or be referred to social prescribing services for the primary purpose of achieving work the paper argues that there are benefits in making work a more central part of the services, given that work is an important determinant of health and wellbeing. The paper identifies a number of elements that are critical to ensuring social prescribing can contribute positively to improving work-related outcomes for clients. These are: an engaged link worker; a patient-centred approach; strong links with a wide range of good quality community support; the ability to fill gaps in existing community support; and strong links (preferably co-location) with GPs. The paper also considers a number of barriers to improving work outcomes through social prescribing, which are: limited focus on health and wellbeing and health service use; lack of expertise around work and related challenges (e.g. welfare system); short-termism in service provision; low availability and quality of local service provision; and poor awareness of work as a health outcome.

Sixteen (16)

Mutually Inclusive Partnerships

‘16’ is a service that blends tried and tested supported employment approaches with person-centred methods. The goal is to enable service users to achieve their personal employment related outcomes. The service supports a range of groups.

Jobs Friends Houses

Jobs Friends Houses

Founded by Sgt Steve Hodgkins, Jobs, Friends and Houses offers volunteering, training and employment opportunities to marginalised adults, mainly ex offenders and/or those with mental health issues or in abstinence. The project is built on the belief that people will make make stable and sustainable changes when they have: "• a safe place to live that is free from threat • a social network that is supportive of their attempts at recovery • meaningful activities, particularly those that confer self-worth and that offer a positive future"

Social prescribing for mental health: a guide to commissioning and delivery

FRIEDLI Lynne
2008

This guidance describes the use of non-medical interventions, sometimes called ‘social prescribing’ or ‘community referral’, to improve mental health and wellbeing. Social prescribing supports improved access both to psychological treatments and to interventions addressing the wider determinants of mental health. It can contribute to greater awareness of the relative contribution to mental wellbeing of individual psychological skills and attributes (e.g. autonomy, positive affect and self-efficacy) and the circumstances of people’s lives: housing, employment, income and status. The guide: examines the benefits of social prescribing; outlines the policy context and evidence base for social prescribing; gives guidance on commissioning social prescribing; provides information on interventions and how to deliver social prescribing; and describes the findings of a social prescribing development project commissioned by Care Services Improvement Partnership (CSIP) North West. Overall, the guidance aims to support localities in developing, implementing and evaluating social prescribing schemes, with a special focus on mental health and wellbeing. The report recommends that social prescribing is made available as part of prevention and early intervention within primary care, and also to support recovery from severe mental distress.

Shared-life communities for people with a learning disability: a review of evidence

CUMELLA Stuart
2015

A review of the evidence from research about shared-life communities for people with a learning disability, summarising the results from the small number of academic studies which have attempted to measure the quality of life of people with a learning disability living in such communities. This study shows how shared-life communities facilitate a high quality of life for their residents with a learning disability and in particular: high levels of meaningful employment - residents are able to work full time in a range of unskilled and skilled work essential to the daily life and economy of the community, while also exercising choice over where they are able to work; opportunities for friendship - a shared-life communities provide a large clustering of potential friends with the opportunity to meet in workplace and informal settings, while ease of communication enables friendships to be sustained; and long-term relationships - living in extended families in a long-term social relationship with co-workers/assistants enables both groups to become familiar with each other’s pattern of communication.

Accession

Accession Social Enterprise

Accession is a social enterprise which supports adults with a range of learning and physical disabilities and long term mental health problems to find a route into employment. It runs 7 businesses across 5 sites in the borough of Ealing and offers training, voluntary positions and paid work, reinvesting income into creating more of these opportunities.

Our support, our lives: joining up the public services used by disabled people

DAVIES Alissa
2015

Examines how health and social care integration can work better for working-age disabled people in the care system and applies key lessons and themes from integrated care and disabled people’s definitions of independent living to a wider range of public services. The report draws on desktop analysis of the impact of current integrated care initiatives on working-age disabled people, findings from interviews and focus groups with disabled adults, and Scope’s Better Care Project research. It argues that while the drivers behind integration have mostly been considered in the context of the ageing population the evidence strongly indicates that disabled adults should become a priority group for integrated care, alongside older people. It suggests that existing integrated care initiatives are not going far enough and considers how the Better Care Fund, Integrated Care Pioneers and Integrated Personal Commissioning can do more to improve outcomes for disabled adults. To help ensure the full potential of integrated care is full realised, the report identifies key action points on the following three fronts: incentives and rewards for independent living; a longer-term approach to risks and benefits; and making it clearer whether schemes apply to disabled adults. The report concludes that future plans for joined up support should apply the lessons from existing integrated care initiatives to the wider integrated support agenda, addressing all the barriers to independent living and encompassing education, work, volunteering, welfare and housing.

Promising returns: a commissioners guide to investing in mentoring and befriending programmes

MENTORING AND BEFRIENDING FOUNDATION
2012

This guide aims to give an overview of the range, diversity and positive impact of mentoring and befriending activity. Using case studies and programme examples, it outlines a range of mentoring and befriending approaches and identifies the key potential outcomes, including reduced offending, improved community cohesion, improved access to employment, reduced social isolation, higher aspirations and increased independence. The document also explains how the Mentoring and Befriending Foundation can support commissioners identify effective programmes.

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