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Results for 'evaluation'

Results 1 - 10 of 86

Evaluation of the H4All Wellbeing Service pilot: April 1st 2016 - January 31st 2017

JAMMU Dalvinder, BOND Andy
2017

An evaluation of the first 10 months of the Hillingdon H4All Wellbeing Service pilot, commissioned by Hillingdon CCG in April 2016. The service is a collaboration between 5 local third sector charities and provides older patients in Hillingdon with a range of services, including: information and advice, practical support, goal setting and ongoing support to manage LTCs, befriending and mentoring, and signposting and referral to voluntary and statutory services. During the evaluation period the H4All service supported 1,099 patients with 2,729 enquiries resulting in 11,675 contacts with/for patients. Analysis of completed Patient Activation Measure (PAM) outcome questionnaires found that most people accessing the service increased their PAM score, with an average movement of 8 points per patient in their individual scores. A total of 44 of the Hillingdon GP practices referred to the Wellbeing Service during the evaluation period in the first ten months and gave very positive feedback. The appendices include individual patient case studies highlight how they have benefitted from the service.

Arts on prescription for community‐dwelling older people with a range of health and wellness needs

POULOS Roslyn G., et al
2019

Published evidence for the role of participatory art in supporting health and well‐being is growing. The Arts on Prescription model is one vehicle by which participatory art can be delivered. Much of the focus of Arts on Prescription has been on the provision of creative activities for people with mental health needs. This Arts on Prescription program, however, targeted community‐dwelling older people with a wide range of health and wellness needs. Older people were referred to the program by their healthcare practitioner. Professional artists led courses in visual arts, photography, dance and movement, drama, singing, or music. Classes were held weekly for 8–10 weeks, with six to eight participants per class, and culminated with a showing of work or a performance. Program evaluation involved pre‐ and postcourse questionnaires, and focus groups and individual interviews. Evaluation data on 127 participants aged 65 years and older were available for analysis. This study found that Arts on Prescription had a positive impact on participants. Quantitative findings revealed a statistically significant improvement in the Warwick–Edinburgh Mental Well‐being Scale (WEMWBS) as well as a statistically significant increase in the level of self‐reported creativity and frequency of creative activities. Qualitative findings indicated that the program provided challenging artistic activities which created a sense of purpose and direction, enabled personal growth and achievement, and empowered participants, in a setting which fostered the development of meaningful relationships with others. This evaluation adds to the evidence base in support of Arts on Prescription by expanding the application of the model to older people with a diverse range of health and wellness needs.

Age UK Rotherham hospital aftercare service: evaluation of the pilot extension into UECC and AMU at TRFT

DAYSON Chris, BASHIR Nadia, LEATHER David
2018

An independent evaluation of the pilot extension of the Age UK Rotherham (AUKR) Hospital Aftercare Service (HAS, into the Emergency Department and Assessment Medical Unit of The Rotherham Foundation Trust Hospital. The pilot, funded by the Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG), ran from 1st October 2017 to 30th September 2018. The evaluation looks at outcomes, focussing on the impact of the service on avoidable hospital admissions, patient experience and independence. It reports that the pilot service provided support to 239 older people who would otherwise have been admitted, offering transport to return home where safe to do so, help and support to settle back in at home and support to access other forms of community based support to enable them to continue to live independently. The findings of the evaluation were overwhelmingly positive. Outcomes achieved include: the prevention of 20 in-patient admissions resulting in the avoidance of £32,180 (estimated) in NHS costs; the provision of additional support in their home to 55 HAS patients and access additional benefits entitlements with a total value of £22,243.55; and reduced waiting times for patient prior to discharge and an improved flow through UECC. Both patients and staff were very positive about the service. The evaluation estimates that overall the pilot led to total benefits (to health services and to patients) of £65,704, a return on investment of 73 pence (£0.73) for each pound (£) invested by the CCG.

Precious memories: a randomized controlled trial on the effects of an autobiographical memory intervention delivered by trained volunteers in residential care homes

WESTERHO Gerben J., et al
2018

Objectives: This study assesses the effects of an autobiographical memory intervention on the prevention and reduction of depressive symptoms in older persons in residential care. Trained volunteers delivered the intervention. Methods: A randomized controlled trial was carried out with depressive symptoms as the primary outcome. The experimental condition received the intervention Precious Memories one-on-one, whereas the control condition had individual unstructured contacts with a volunteer. Participants were 86 older persons living in residential care. There were three measurements: pre-intervention, post-intervention (2 months after the first measurement), and follow-up (8 months after the first measurement). Besides depressive symptoms, the retrieval of specific positive memories was measured as a process variable. Anxiety, loneliness, well-being, and mastery were assessed as secondary outcomes. Results: Depressive symptoms improved equally in the intervention and the control condition at post-measurement. Participants with clinically relevant depressive symptoms also maintained the effects at follow-up in both conditions. The retrieval of specific positive memories improved more in the autobiographical memory intervention, although this was not maintained at follow-up. Anxiety and loneliness improved equally well in both conditions, but no effects were found for well-being or mastery. Conclusion: It is concluded that volunteers can deliver the intervention and contribute to the mental health of this highly vulnerable group of older adults.

Age Friendly Island: local evaluation. Annual evaluation report 17/18

NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT TEAM FOR INCLUSION
2018

Age Friendly Island (AFI) is one of 14 partnership programmes funded through Big Lottery Fulfilling Lives: Ageing Better Programme, to pilot new or joined up ways of working to reduce social isolation in older people. This report presents the findings of an evaluation undertaken in the Isle of Wight in 2017-18, the third year of the Programme. The Programme consists of 12 projects, including Community and Care Navigators, Alzheimers Cafe, Care for Carers, Men in Sheds and Mental Health Peer Support. It finds that the Programme has continued to make progress made towards achieving the four main Programme outcomes. It reports that the Programme has continued to opportunities for older people to increase their social connections and has led to decreased social isolation for people involved across the projects; older people are increasingly co-producing and shaping their own individual support and the services; and significant progress towards the Isle of Wight becoming an Age friendly Island, with an increase in inter-generational activities. Although quantitative health and well-being measures have demonstrated either no progress or minimal changes to levels of health and wellbeing, interviews with participants have shown that participation in the Programme has had a positive impact on the physical and mental health, wellbeing and /or quality of life of those involved. The report includes recommendations for the Ageing Better Programme team and for the projects in the Programme.

A pilot programme evaluation of social farming horticultural and occupational activities for older people in Italy

GAGLIARDI Cristina, et al
2019

The aim of this study was to evaluate a 1‐year social farming programme conducted between 2014 and 2015, including horticultural and occupational activities on six agricultural farms for older people in good general health. Social farming is a practice that uses agricultural resources to provide health, social or educational services to vulnerable groups of people. Activity participation, social relationships, physical activity, and the quality of life of the participants were assessed using a pretest, posttest design. A total of 112 subjects were interviewed at baseline, though only 73 participants were retained through the end of the follow‐up, resulting in a dropout rate of 34%. Data analysis revealed significant improvements in both social relationships and overall occupational engagement at the end of the programme, with significant increases in the frequency of contact with friends or relatives as well as the number of activities performed by the participants. This work adds to the literature on the effects of social farming and indicates that farming may provide opportunities for older people to engage in activities that stimulate social behaviours.

Creativity in care: evaluation report

CITY ARTS
2014

An evaluation of Creativity in Care, a programme commissioned by Nottinghamshire County Council which explored creative approaches to promoting well-being for older people in care and ways of overcoming the barriers that face staff, carers and homes in trying to provide creative and imaginative environments for older people. This report reviews the outcomes of three aspects of the programme: the artist residency, creative mentoring and training. It also sets out recommendations based on the findings. The evaluation identifies the main learning outcomes of the programme as: learning – new approaches were developed by staff resulting in improved motivation and engagement of residents; social skills – positive interaction between residents increased, with one to one work supporting social engagement for the more isolated residents; and value – an improved sense of wellbeing was gained through participation in the arts, with improved levels of confidence and increased decision making; Legacy - the programme led to improved communication, networking and sharing between care homes. Training was also accessed by residential care staff to put into practice beyond the life of the programme.

Understanding the effectiveness and mechanisms of a social prescribing service: a mixed method analysis

WOODALL James, et al
2018

Background: Evidence of the effectiveness of social prescribing is inconclusive causing commissioning challenges. This research focusses on a social prescribing scheme in Northern England which deploys ‘Wellbeing Coordinators’ who offer support to individuals, providing advice on local groups and services in their community. The research sought to understand the outcomes of the service and, in addition, the processes which supported delivery. Methods: Quantitative data was gathered from service users at the point they entered the service and also at the point they exited. Qualitative interviews were also undertaken with service users to gather further understanding of the service and any positive or negative outcomes achieved. In addition, a focus group discussion was also conducted with members of social prescribing staff to ascertain their perspectives of the service both from an operational and strategic perspective. Results: In total, 342 participants provided complete wellbeing data at baseline and post stage and 26 semi-structured qualitative interviews were carried out. Improvements in participants’ well-being, and perceived levels of health and social connectedness as well as reductions in anxiety was demonstrated. In many cases, the social prescribing service had enabled individuals to have a more positive and optimistic view of their life often through offering opportunities to engage in a range of hobbies and activities in the local community. The data on reductions in future access to primary care was inconclusive. Some evidence was found to show that men may have greater benefit from social prescribing than women. Some of the processes which increased the likelihood of success on the social prescribing scheme included the sustained and flexible relationship between the service user and the Wellbeing Coordinator and a strong and vibrant voluntary and community sector. Conclusions: Social prescribing has the potential to address the health and social needs of individuals and communities. This research has shown a range of positive outcomes as a result of service users engaging with the service. Social prescribing should be conceptualised as one way to support primary care and tackle unmet needs.

A mixed methods case study exploring the impact of membership of a multi-activity, multicentre community group on social wellbeing of older adults

LINDSAY-SMITH Gabrielle, et al
2018

Background: Social wellbeing factors such as loneliness and social support have a major impact on the health of older adults and can contribute to physical and mental wellbeing. However, with increasing age, social contacts and social support typically decrease and levels of loneliness increase. Group social engagement appears to have additional benefits for the health of older adults compared to socialising individually with friends and family, but further research is required to confirm whether group activities can be beneficial for the social wellbeing of older adults. Methods: This one-year longitudinal mixed methods study investigated the effect of joining a community group, offering a range of social and physical activities, on social wellbeing of adults with a mean age of 70. The study combined a quantitative survey assessing loneliness and social support (n = 28; three time-points, analysed using linear mixed models) and a qualitative focus group study (n = 11, analysed using thematic analysis) of members from Life Activities Clubs Victoria, Australia. Results: There was a significant reduction in loneliness (p = 0.023) and a trend toward an increase in social support (p = 0.056) in the first year after joining. The focus group confirmed these observations and suggested that social support may take longer than 1 year to develop. Focus groups also identified that group membership provided important opportunities for developing new and diverse social connections through shared interest and experience. These connections were key in improving the social wellbeing of members, especially in their sense of feeling supported or connected and less lonely. Participants agreed that increasing connections was especially beneficial following significant life events such as retirement, moving to a new house or partners becoming unwell. Conclusions: Becoming a member of a community group offering social and physical activities may improve social wellbeing in older adults, especially following significant life events such as retirement or moving-house, where social network changes. These results indicate that ageing policy and strategies would benefit from encouraging long-term participation in social groups to assist in adapting to changes that occur in later life and optimise healthy ageing.

Evaluating the Side by Side peer support programme

BILLSBOROUGH Julie, et al
2017

An evaluation of the Side by Side programme, which aimed to increase the availability and quality of community based peer support for people experiencing mental health problems across England. The programme was led by the mental health charity Mind, in collaboration with Depression Alliance and Bipolar UK. The evaluation covered four areas: developing and testing a set of values and principles for peer support; examining the effectiveness of peer support, including changes in wellbeing; building capacity for peer support; and commissioning peer support. It also explored how peer support took place within Side by Side projects specifically aimed at peers from a Black and Minority Ethnic background. The evaluation found that peer support was valued and helpful to people involved. It also identified six core values that appeared to underpin all forms of peer support - experience in common, safety, choice and control, two way interactions, human connection, and freedom to be oneself. The findings suggest that peer support enabled people to recover a sense of personal agency and usefulness, which was beneficial to their wellbeing. The evaluation also suggests that peer support works best where commissioners, provider organisations and communities work together to develop a range of approaches to peer support and where people are enabled to take control of how and when they engage with the peer support. The evaluation team was a partnership that included a mental health research team from St George’s, University of London, the McPin Foundation.

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