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Results for 'extra care housing'

Results 1 - 10 of 13

Connections with nature for people living with dementia

EVANS Simon Chester, et al
2019

Purpose: The benefits of “green dementia care”, whereby people living with dementia are supported to connect with nature, are increasingly being recognised. Evidence suggests that these benefits span physical, emotional and social spheres and can make a significant contribution towards quality of life. However, care settings often present specific challenges to promoting such connections due to a range of factors including risk-averse cultures and environmental limitations. The purpose of this paper is to report on a project that aims to explore the opportunities, benefits, barriers and enablers to interaction with nature for people living with dementia in residential care and extra care housing schemes in the UK. Design/methodology/approach: Data were gathered from 144 responses to an online survey by managers/staff of extra care housing schemes and care homes in the UK. In depth-case studies were carried out at three care homes and three extra care housing schemes, involving interviews with residents, staff and family carers. Findings: A wide variety of nature-based activities were reported, both outdoor and indoor. Positive benefits reported included improved mood, higher levels of social interaction and increased motivation for residents, and greater job satisfaction for staff. The design and layout of indoor and outdoor spaces is key, in addition to staff who feel enabled to promote connections with nature. Research limitations/implications: This paper is based on a relatively small research project in which the participants were self-selecting and therefore not necessarily representative. Practical implications: The paper makes some key recommendations for good practice in green dementia care in extra care housing and care homes. Social implications: Outdoor activities can promote social interaction for people living with dementia in care settings. The authors’ findings are relevant to the recent policy focus on social prescribing. Originality/value: The paper makes some key recommendations for good practice in green dementia care in extra care housing and care homes.

Going the extra step: a compendium of best practice in dementia care. Preventing unwanted isolation and loneliness for people with dementia living in housing with care

TWYFORD Katey, WELLS Wendy
2019

A collection of examples of extra care schemes and other housing related community services that support people with dementia to develop meaningful relationships, helping to reduce social isolation and loneliness. They include examples of personalised support that can be arranged for residents; examples of groups and social activities; and different organisational and community-based approaches that have been adopted. The examples range from informal arrangements supported by staff or other residents to formal service provision.

Embedding community circles in support for older people living in residential care homes or extra care: a practical resource

ROUTLEDGE Martin, BARTON Cath, WILTON Sharon
2019

Based upon the first two years of experience developing Community Circles in Wigan, this resource shares learning and progress to date. It also outlines the key roles and activities to consider when setting up Community Circles in residential care homes and extra care housing. It will be useful for anyone wanting to include Community Circles as part of the offer of support for older people in residential care or extra care. It will also be of wider use to those looking to embed a range of person and community centred approaches in these types of support. Links to additional guides, reports, tools and materials are included throughout.

Pulling together

WORF Candy, GOODMAN Jolie, PLIMPTON Ben
2018

This practice handbook draws on the work of the Mental Health Foundation's Standing Together project, which facilitated 19 peer-support groups for older people living in extra care housing. The aim of the groups was to improve the emotional and social wellbeing of participants, and reduce loneliness and social isolation. The handbook pulls together learning from the project and provides inspiration to anyone wanting to set up a peer-support group with older people – whether they are tenants in housing schemes, staff or volunteers. It includes information on group activities used by the facilitators, including digital photography activities, memory boxes, collages and art sessions, and flower arranging workshops. It also provides advice on managing conflict between group members, information on how to support a community when a member dies, information for facilitators, and highlights the importance of listening to group members.

An evaluation of the Standing Together project

MENTAL HEALTH FOUNDATION
2018

An evaluation of the Standing Together project, which examines the impact of peer-support groups on the emotional and social wellbeing of people living in extra care housing. Specifically, it looks at whether participation in the Standing Together programme had an effect on the outcomes of loneliness and social isolation; emotional wellbeing; and meaningful activity and community engagement. The groups ran once a week for six months in 19 extra care housing schemes within Housing & Care 21 and Notting Hill Housing Trust. Each group was led by two trained facilitators. Facilitators sought to include all residents from the extra care housing group including individuals with mental health difficulties, dementia, learning disability and/or significant loneliness. Focus group findings, which consisted of 45 residents at baseline and 57 at follow-up, demonstrated that most residents felt that participating in the groups led to positive impacts in all the outcome areas. Residents also expressed a desire for the groups to continue. Staff involved in the programme also felt that the groups led to reduced feelings of isolation and loneliness, increased companionship, mental stimulation and social inclusion. The process evaluation also emphasised the value in having two skilled tactful facilitators in each group who are able to effectively manage a group of residents, some of whom may have dementia or cognitive impairments. The report includes recommendations for conducting evaluations of group work in later life.

Demonstrating the health and social cost-benefits of lifestyle housing for older people

HOUSING LEARNING AND IMPROVEMENT NETWORK
2017

This report, commissioned by Keepmoat Regeneration/ENGIE, sets out the evidence for the benefits of developing specialist retirement housing for people aged over 55, including cost savings. It focuses on the benefits of age restricted retirement housing or sheltered accommodation, care villages and specialist extra care housing with services and care on-site. Part one lists key facts and figures on the health and social care cost-benefits of lifestyle housing for older people. Part two provides more detailed findings of the potential benefits including the areas of: social connectedness and reducing loneliness; life expectancy, keeping couples together and supporting informal carers, financial savings in adult social care and the NHS, and preventing the need for institutional care. References and links are listed at the end of the document.

Home from hospital: how housing services are relieving pressures on the NHS

COPEMAN Ian, EDWARDS Margaret, PORTEUS Jeremy, HOUSING LEARNING AND IMPROVEMENT NETWORK
2017

This report shows how housing services are helping to relieve pressure on the NHS by reducing delays in discharging people from hospital and preventing unnecessary hospital admissions. It features 12 case studies to show the positive impact these services have on people’s lives and the cost benefit to the NHS. The case studies highlight services that will benefit people most at risk of delayed discharge, such as older people, people with mental health problems and people experiencing homelessness. The case studies also demonstrate a diversity of housing and health services including: 'step down' bed services for people coming out of hospital who cannot return to their own home immediately; hospital discharge support and housing adaptation services to enable timely and appropriate transfers out of hospital and back to patients' existing homes; providing a new home for people whose existing home or lack of housing mean that they have nowhere suitable to be discharged to; and Home from Hospital services to keeping people well at home who would otherwise be at risk of being admitted or readmitted to hospital. The report also considers the impact and additional savings that could be made by housing providers if this work were to be scaled up.

Housing our ageing population: learning from councils meeting the housing needs of ageing population

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2017

The suitability of the housing stock is of critical importance to the health of individuals and also impacts on public spending, particularly social care and the NHS. This report sets out what is required to meet the housing needs and aspirations of an ageing population, outlines the current policy context and presents detailed case studies of good practice to show how councils are innovating to support older people to live in their homes for longer and promote positive ageing. They include examples of integrated approaches to health, housing and care to support older people at home; care and repair schemes to provide support for older people in mainstream housing, long term housing planning; and developing appropriate new housing for older people. The case studies are from Birmingham City Council, Central Bedfordshire Council, Essex County Council, Mansfield District Council, Newcastle City Council, North Somerset, Bristol, Bath and North-East Somerset Councils, and Worcestershire County Council. The report highlights key lessons from the case studies: having a clear vision, promoting awareness and changing attitudes; housing planning, which meets local need and involves older people; delivering and enabling new housing for older people across the public and private sector; developing integrated approaches to housing, health and care; and sustaining older people in mainstream housing. It also outlines recommendations for Government, policy makers, councils, and providers.

The role of housing in effective hospital discharge

SKILLS FOR CARE, CHARTERED INSTITUTE OF HOUSING
2017

A collection of case studies from a wide range of housing providers, highlighting the role they can play in developing hospital discharge services. The case studies demonstrate the development of effective partnerships to meet hospital discharge needs, how these partnerships can help meet partners’ targets, and the workforce skills required to ensure effective services. Key learning points from the case studies include recognising and understanding different working cultures; building lasting relationships; effective and safe communication of information between agencies; developing sustainable and long term provision; and building a person centred solution. The publication will be particularly useful for social care and health commissioners, providers of housing and support and workforce development leads.

The value of peer support on cognitive improvement amongst older people living with dementia

CHAKKALACKAL Lauren
2014

Peer support can play a critical role in improving the wellbeing, social support and practical coping strategies of older people living with dementia. This paper describes selected findings from the Mental Health Foundation’s evaluation of three peer support groups for people living with dementia in extra-care housing schemes. It highlights the groups as a promising approach for maintaining cognitive faculties, reducing social isolation, increasing social networks and improving overall wellbeing. A mixed-method study design examined the impact of the groups on participants’ wellbeing, managing memory, independent living skills and social support. Participants reported positive impact from taking part in the support groups for wellbeing, social support and practical coping strategies. Participants also reported positive benefits of the groups on communication abilities, managing memory and managing their lives. Peer support groups in extra-care housing schemes address the psychological, social and emotional needs of people with dementia. This evaluation adds to the literature on the effectiveness of these interventions for those with cognitive impairment.

Results 1 - 10 of 13

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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